Author Archives: Anthony

2021 January: Dead fish, yabbies, aquatic life (Cohuna, Vic). Pesticide: Acrolein

Fish, yabbies and aquatic life dead after ‘toxic’ herbicide treatment in irrigation channel

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-01-23/dead-fish-after-herbicide-acrolein-used-in-irrigation-channel/13084030

Mal Johnson isn’t happy. The Cohuna farmer has spent the past few days cleaning up dead fish and plants from an irrigation channel on his property near Cohuna in northern Victoria.

“I walked up onto the channel bank, looked into the water and there was just a foot-wide stream of fish, all dead,” Mr Johnson said.

The Torrumbarry Irrigation Channel was injected this week with the toxic herbicide Acrolein to get rid of weeds that are blocking up the system that provides water to more than 100 farming properties in the region.

“I’ve walked up here several times in the last few days, and I go home and say why? Why does this keep on happening to our environment? It’s just not fair,” Mr Johnson said.

Murray Goulburn Water (MGW) notified irrigators about the herbicide treatment and told them not to use water from the channels for 72 hours afterwards.

Water full of dead fish is meant to be safe

But three days later, Mr Johnson is still removing dead fish from the water.

“This channel is meant to be safe to use today,” he said.

But he’s concerned that the dead fish and plants in the water may cause botulism in cattle.

GMW assistant manager Tim Nitschke said the water was safe for use.

“I’m extremely confident that it is safe,” he said.

“There have been many, many studies done on this product. We’ve also done multiple and extensive water quality testing programs to demonstrate that,” he said.

Mr Nitschke said fish kills were to be expected during the herbicide treatment, but there was no alternative.

Outdated herbicide kills endangered species, ecologist says

“Acroelin is our last resort,” he said.

“We don’t use it as our ‘go-to’ product, but it’s something we use when we have no other options.”

But ecologist Damien Cook said Acrolein is an outdated herbicide from the 1960s and is killing endangered species like the growling grass frog.

“It was once described as the most common species of frog — now there’s only one population that we know of in the area,” Mr Cook said.

“One of the reasons it’s declined is herbicide use, and chemicals in the environment.

“The frog has gone from being one of the most common species to now being endangered.”

Mr Cook said although the Torrumbarry Channel was an artificially constructed irrigation network, the channels remained an important habitat for aquatic life along the Murray-Darling Basin.

Weeds blocking irrigation channel

But Kerang farmer Geoff Kendell said the weeds are causing headaches along the channels and need to be removed.

“Goulburn Murray Water will ring us up and say ‘What’s wrong? You’re supposed to be having 20 megalitres coming out of the channel, and you’re only getting three out,'” he said.

“It’s the weed that’s causing the problem.”

But Mr Kendell said Goulburn Murray Water should have taken a proactive approach, rather than a reactive one.

“They should have dried the channels and the creeks out in winter and allowed the frost to kill most of the weeds,” he said.

Mr Nitschke said that idea was under consideration.

“GMW is definitely looking at de-watering our network more regularly,” he said.

“There are losses associated with that, but we’re trying to find that right balance — making sure we still provide irrigation water to our farmers so that they can produce food and fibre.”

2020 September: Bird Deaths Hampden Road Reserve, Lakemba (NSW)

EPA seeking information after deliberate bird baiting

https://www.epa.nsw.gov.au/news/media-releases/2020/epamedia200911-epa-seeking-information-after-deliberate-bird-baiting

The NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA) is appealing for information about the apparent poisoning of a large number of birds at a suburban Sydney park.

The EPA received reports of 24 and possibly more deceased and sick birds at Hampden Road Reserve, Lakemba, with 10 found in a single day on Saturday 29 August.

The affected species include native Corellas, Ibis, Cockatoos and pigeons. A Sydney Wildlife volunteer came across suspected poison rodenticide scattered with rice on the ground in the Reserve.

EPA Director Regulatory Operations Giselle Howard said the killing of birds, whether through intentional or reckless misuse of pesticide, was a serious offence.

“On the evidence we’ve received, this is deplorable behaviour. The EPA will certainly take legal action against anyone found guilty of unlawfully using pesticides to poison native animals.

“Under the Pesticides Act it is illegal to use pesticides to kill or harm non-target animals such as native birds.

“No suspects have been identified, but the EPA would be happy to receive any information from the public about who may have baited these birds,” Ms Howard.

Canterbury-Bankstown Council are conducting daily inspections of the reserve and clearing any suspected baits. Council officers have been asked to report any suspicious behaviour to the EPA.

Along with Council, the EPA is also working in collaboration with WIRES, Sydney Wildlife and Taronga Zoo to find those responsible for the apparent bird baiting. Each of these organisations has a vital role in protecting wildlife from harm.

2019 July: Rosebank (NSW). Spray Drift Fine

Spray drift complaint might have been avoided if wind speed records were kept

1 July 2019

https://www.theland.com.au/story/6249880/epa-fines-highlight-importance-of-on-farm-data/

A Northern Rivers macadamia farm and its contractor were punished by the Environment Protection Authority last week over a case involving a neighbour’s complaint about chemical drift.

No one could actually verify the fact that a contractor on a Rosebank farm near Lismore had sprayed pesticide while it was blowing a gale – up to 52 kilometres an hour as was claimed – exceeding chemical manufacturers’ guidelines.

Bureau of Meteorology wind data for the district comes either from Cape Byron, 23 metres above the ocean, or Lismore airport, which at 11m and on the Wilsons River floodplain typically receives less than half that breeze.

While there was no evidence to suggest the claim was true or not, there should have been, and that’s why the EPA slapped Seabreeze Macadamias with a $1000 fine for incomplete records of farm activity on the day.

“We recommend producers buy an anemometer and log wind speed during spraying activities,” said Australian Macadamia Society chief executive officer Jolyon Burnett.

“It is important to log data. The only reason this grower was fined was because of incomplete records.”

The EPA issued an official caution to the spray contractor for not holding a licence to undertake ground applicator work, a requirement now one year old. The contractor said he didn’t know that.

Neither did the AMS, which was unable to inform its member growers. However, everyone is now being made aware of the need for contractor licencing at grower meetings taking place this week.

Beyond compliance Mr Burnett said the logging of on-farm data was the hallmark of modern best practice, but to get all growers on board required a big cultural shift.

“Best standard business practice should be about measuring pesticide rates and fertiliser applications and we will see an increase in the area,” he said.

As well, the AMA welcomed new initiatives like the $500,000 now available to rehabilitate priority coastal catchments through Local Land Services and Queensland’s brand new reef protection legislation which will help guide farmers when it comes to best practice.

Meanwhile, the production of macadamias globally continues to grow at about seven per cent with demand exceeding that and leading to stable prices above $5/kg for nut in shell at 10 per cent moisture.

Dry summer conditions will lower forecasted harvest tonnage by 5500 tonnes to 48,000t. Last year’s record production was 52,000t.

Queensland now supplies 53 per cent of product with Bundaberg district contributing 40pc and the Northern Rivers 35pc. South-east Queensland and isolated plantations on the mid North Coast make up the remainder.

2019 February: Jerilderie (NSW). Spray Drift

EPA investigating possible spray drift near Jerilderie

The NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA) is investigating an alleged incident of potential spray drift that impacted a local cotton crop at Jerilderie in the state’s Riverina region.

 EPA Manager Regional Operations Riverina Far West Craig Bretherton said an investigation commenced after a complaint was made to the EPA’s Environment Line in December.

“Disappointingly, this is the second consecutive year this has occurred to summer crops in the area,” Mr Bretherton said.

The EPA has taken samples from the farm and these are currently being tested as part of the investigation.

Mr Bretherton said this is a timely reminder to landholders and contractors to use herbicides responsibly this summer to avoid spray drift that may impact surrounding areas.

2019/20: Dookie (Victoria) – Atrazine

2019/20: Dookie (Victoria) – Atrazine detected

p35 “All the pesticides tested in the source water were reported by the NATA laboratory at values below the level of reporting with the exception of a single detection of Atrazine at Euroa and Dookie, both at 10ug/L and in the raw water, well under the health limit of 20ug/L.”

Goulburn Valley Water – Water Quality Annual Report 2019-20

2019-20: Euroa (Victoria) – Atrazine

2019/20: Euroa (Victoria) – Atrazine detected

p35 “All the pesticides tested in the source water were reported by the NATA laboratory at values below the level of reporting with the exception of a single detection of Atrazine at Euroa and Dookie, both at 10ug/L and in the raw water, well under the health limit of 20ug/L.”

Goulburn Valley Water – Water Quality Annual Report 2019-20

2020 October: Contaminated Gibberellic Acid – Sunraysia Region (Victoria) – Clopyralid

The Weekly Times October 14 2020

P1 Killer Chemicals Table-grape producers to sue Chinese company over contaminated spray.

A group of Australian table grape growers are preparing to go up against a Chinese state-owned chemical giant in a legal battle for millions of dollars in compensation after a contaminated chemical destroyed their vines.

And The Weekly Times can reveal it took chemical company ADAMA more than three months to recall the product after being alerted to issues associated with it – a decision the industry fears could have jeopardised Australian access to lucrative export markets, worth hundreds of millions of dollars.

An investigation by The Weekly Times can also reveal:

As LEAST 11 growers are seeking more than $7 million in compensation from ADAMA after its Gibberellic Acid, used to promote fruit growth, was found to contain Clopyralid, a weed killer toxic to table grapes and not registered for use on fruit.

Damage from the contaminated Gibberellic Acid was brought to ADAMA’s attention in October 2018. However, the company did not recall the product until February 13, 2019 – about two weeks after growers started harvesting their table grapes.

The Federal Government body responsible for policing chemical companies, Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority, which is funded by the companies it regulates, is yet to complete its investigation into the incident, more than 20 months after the recall.

New table-grape varieties that were grown as part of a trial by Australia’s leading science agency, CSIRO, were damaged by the contaminated chemical, but it is understood CSIRO is not taking legal action.

One table grape grower, who did not want to be named, said the contaminated Gibberellic Acid had “crippled” his family’s business…

Most of the 11 growers who sprayed the contaminated chemical have or are in the process of pulling out their vines because they were so badly damaged.

Eight growers, mostly located in the Sunraysia district where most of the country’s table grapes are grown, have begun legal action in the Victorian County Court against ADAMA and the retailer they bought the Gibberellic Acid from National Agricultural Services.

Court documents show these growers were seeking about $3.8 million in loss and damages but it is now understood ongoing losses now mean they are now seeking more than $7 million.

Solicitor Tyler Wolff, who is representing most of the growers, said they had lost three to four years worth of income.

It has hit the smaller growers really hard and put emotional strain on their business and family life. Some have had to sell permanent water while they wait for money to come in,” he said. “It has hit the bigger growers hard as they haven’t been able to pursue opportunities such as expanding their operations….

Victorian Farmers Federation vice-president Emma Germano said there should not be a “culture of secrecy” and there were “clearly deficiencies in the system” around recalling contaminated chemicals that needed to be addressed for the sake of Australia’s “clean green image.”…

Ms Germano raised concerns about the agriculture chemical industry’s regulator APVMA, being majority funded by the companies it regulates.

“Is it truly an independent regulator? If it’s not we have to ask the Government to resource this differently. Clearly we need something that is a bit more rigorous,” she said.

ADAMA which is owned by ADAMA Agricultural Solutions, a subsidiary of the Chinese state-owned ChemChina, did not answer questions from The Weekly Times.

Neither did National Agricultural Services.

At the time of the recall, ADAMA claimed a labelling issue occurred to the tail end of the batch of Gibberellic Acid, during the manufacturing process conducted by a third party.

The Weekly Times understands the third party was Autopak, an agriculture chemical manufacturer in NSW. Autopak did not respond to questions.

The APVMA said it was unable to comment “on matters currently under investigation”.

In 2019-20 the APVMA received 280 allegations against the companies it regulates and from these referred two for prosecution and provided nine with formal warnings.

2020 August: Geraldton (Western Australia). Pesticide: Ratsak/Brodifacoum

Native owls, lizards dying after eating mice and rats poisoned with Ratsak

26/8/20

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-08-26/wildlife-carers-say-owls-lizards-are-dying-eating-poisoned-mice/

A Western Australian wildlife carer is urging people to stop using a well-known brand of rodenticide because it is killing native owls and lizards who eat poisoned mice and rats.

Michelle Jones of GG Wildlife Rescue in Geraldton takes in sick and injured native animals to recover and then release back to the wild.

In the past month, she has seen five native owl species that were poisoned by Ratsak and only one survived.

“The ones that come in are the lucky ones,” she said.

The one that survived is still in care and when it has returned to a healthy weight it will be released in the same location it was found.

Alternatives to poison

Ms Jones said at this time of the year it can be common to see more vermin, meaning an increase in the use of poisonings.

Not only can rodenticides be fatal to native owls, but also to native lizard species.

“I don’t think they realise that the second degree poison is actually killing and making a lot of native species really sick,” she said.

Ms Jones said there are other options that can be used to get rid of mice and rats, like traps, or simply ensuring that you clean up anything that could be a food supply like bird seed.

Nature’s pest control

Some of the most common species Ms Jones has seen poisoned have been the southern boobook owl, the barn owl and black-shouldered kites.

Ms Jones said the best way to get rid of mice and rats is to look after their predators.

“What we are killing, if you’ve got them on your property … these guys are natural predators for rats and mice,” she said.

“You’re really doing something that inadvertently is going to affect the ecology and the ecosystem on your property for future generations.”

2020 June: Canola Crop Damage. Glenorchy (Victoria). Pesticide: Triasulfuron?

Suspicious canola crop damage under investigation

Aug 19 2020

https://www.northqueenslandregister.com.au/story/6886786/suspicious-canola-crop-damage-under-investigation/?cs=4751

POLICE are investigating a failed crop in Victoria’s southern Wimmera region to see whether it has been deliberately poisoned.

A canola crop in the Glenorchy district has been killed by herbicide and Ararat Police’s criminal investigation unit is investigating the cause.

“Potential deliberate damage is one of the avenues we are examining,” said senior constable Jackson Seres.

While spray drift is responsible for significant crop damage across the country at this stage it is not believed it is the culprit in this instance.

S/C Seres said all avenues, such as potential accidental contamination of spray equipment were also being looked at but added the farmer did not believe there had been a spraying error to cause the damage.

He said that the poisoning angle did not centre around someone taking a boom spray and applying chemical directly to the paddock, but rather contaminating a water tank used to prepare tank mixes for spraying.

The farmer with the poisoned crop may not have even been the target of the alleged contamination as the water tank is shared by several neighbours.

Police have been given an estimated loss from the damage of $100,000.

Laboratory investigations are ongoing as to what the active ingredient that caused the damage was, with triasulfuron, widely used in common herbicides, nominated as one potential culprit given the way the damage presented.

It is believed the herbicide was applied to the crop at a post-emergent stage, likely to be some time in June.

Grains industry leaders were scratching their heads to think of a precedent.

While spray drift and accidental application of the wrong chemical by the farmer has torched crops in the past, no one could remember an example in broadacre cropping where spray equipment had been deliberately tampered with in order to sabotage a crop.

The story Suspicious canola crop damage under investigation first appeared on Farm Online.

 

2020: Gwydir Wetlands (New South Wales). Spray Drift

Spray operators urged to apply pesticides carefully to prevent spray drift

https://www.miragenews.com/spray-operators-urged-to-apply-pesticides-carefully-to-prevent-spray-drift/

13 August 2020

The NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA) is reminding spray operators to follow safety protocols and use herbicides and pesticides responsibly to avoid impacting non-target crops and the environment.

The reminder comes after separate incidents in February this year where wetlands and trees in Moree were allegedly damaged by aerial spraying and trees allegedly damaged at Deepwater 40 km north of Glen Innes.

The EPA was alerted to the alleged aerial overspray at Moree by a resident who reported dead and dying leaves on his trees, on roadside trees and trees along the nearby travelling stock route.

Several trees two kilometres away in the Gwydir Wetlands were also found to have recent pesticide spray damage, with foliage dead or burnt off, along with patches of burnt grass.

The company has been fined $1,500 by the EPA for misuse of pesticides.

A Northern Tablelands landowner was also fined $1,500 and received an official caution for allegedly damaging a neighbour’s trees and using a pesticide contrary to an approved label.

EPA Director Regulatory Operations Gary Whytcross said it was positive that both parties had since undertaken to introduce measures to improve spray drift risk assessment and management.

“The proper use of pesticides is critical to ensure the operators are safe when applying pesticides and so is the community and the environment,” Mr Whytcross said.

“Pesticides can harm the environment so all care must be taken to ensure pesticides are not used in unsuitable weather conditions that can result in the pesticides leaving the intended application site.

“Safe pesticide use relies on users following the label, applying pesticides during the appropriate weather conditions and notifying neighbours of the spraying.”

The EPA regulates the use of herbicides and pesticides in NSW, including those used in agriculture and on public land, through the Pesticides Act 1999.

The community plays an important role in helping to monitor pesticide activities. Anyone with concern or knowledge of a spray drift incident or pesticide misuse in their local area should contact the EPA’s Environment Line on 131 555.

2020: Deepwater (New South Wales). Spraydrift

Spray operators urged to apply pesticides carefully to prevent spray drift

https://www.miragenews.com/spray-operators-urged-to-apply-pesticides-carefully-to-prevent-spray-drift/

13 August 2020

The NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA) is reminding spray operators to follow safety protocols and use herbicides and pesticides responsibly to avoid impacting non-target crops and the environment.

The reminder comes after separate incidents in February this year where wetlands and trees in Moree were allegedly damaged by aerial spraying and trees allegedly damaged at Deepwater 40 km north of Glen Innes.

The EPA was alerted to the alleged aerial overspray at Moree by a resident who reported dead and dying leaves on his trees, on roadside trees and trees along the nearby travelling stock route.

Several trees two kilometres away in the Gwydir Wetlands were also found to have recent pesticide spray damage, with foliage dead or burnt off, along with patches of burnt grass.

The company has been fined $1,500 by the EPA for misuse of pesticides.

A Northern Tablelands landowner was also fined $1,500 and received an official caution for allegedly damaging a neighbour’s trees and using a pesticide contrary to an approved label.

EPA Director Regulatory Operations Gary Whytcross said it was positive that both parties had since undertaken to introduce measures to improve spray drift risk assessment and management.

“The proper use of pesticides is critical to ensure the operators are safe when applying pesticides and so is the community and the environment,” Mr Whytcross said.

“Pesticides can harm the environment so all care must be taken to ensure pesticides are not used in unsuitable weather conditions that can result in the pesticides leaving the intended application site.

“Safe pesticide use relies on users following the label, applying pesticides during the appropriate weather conditions and notifying neighbours of the spraying.”

The EPA regulates the use of herbicides and pesticides in NSW, including those used in agriculture and on public land, through the Pesticides Act 1999.

The community plays an important role in helping to monitor pesticide activities. Anyone with concern or knowledge of a spray drift incident or pesticide misuse in their local area should contact the EPA’s Environment Line on 131 555.

2017/18? Southern Boobok Deaths – Perth environs (Western Australia). Pesticides: Warfarin, Difenacoum, Brodifacoum, Bromadiolone, Difethialone, Flocoumafen

Anticoagulant rodenticide exposure in an Australian predatory bird increases with proximity to developed habitat
Michael T. Lohr
Science of the Total Environment 643 (2018) 134–144

Anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) are commonly used worldwide to control commensal rodents. Second generation anticoagulant rodenticides (SGARs) are highly persistent and have the potential to cause secondary poisoning in wildlife. To date no comprehensive assessment has been conducted on AR residues in Australian wildlife.
My aim was to measure AR exposure in a common widespread owl species, the Southern Boobook (Ninox boobook) using boobooks found dead or moribund in order to assess the spatial distribution of this potential threat. A high percentage of boobooks were exposed (72.6%) and many showed potentially dangerous levels of AR residue (N0.1 mg/kg) in liver tissue (50.7%). Multiple rodenticides were detected in the livers of 38.4% of boobooks tested. Total liver concentration of ARs correlated positively with the proportions of developed areas
around points where dead boobooks were recovered and negatively with proportions of agricultural and native land covers. Total AR concentration in livers correlated more closely with land use type at the spatial scale of a boobook’s home range than at smaller or larger spatial scales. Two rodenticides not used by the public (difethialone and flocoumafen) were detected in boobooks indicating that professional use of ARs contributed to secondary exposure. Multiple ARs were also detected in recent fledglings, indicating probable exposure prior to fledging. Taken together, these results suggest that AR exposure poses a serious threat to native predators in Australia, particularly in species using urban and peri-urban areas and species with large home ranges.

2020 August: Boobook Owl Poisoning – Melbourne (Victoria). Pesticide: Brodifacoum

Walking time bombs’: bird lovers call for ban on poisons

https://www.theage.com.au/environment/conservation/walking-time-bombs-bird-lovers-call-for-ban-on-poisons-20200812-p55kyl.html

August 12 2020

When word got around the office a boobook owl had been spotted in a nearby inner-city street, everyone in the BirdLife office grabbed their binoculars and headed for the door.

Unsurprisingly, when staff at Australia’s largest bird conservation organisation hear an unusual bird has visited Melbourne’s CBD, they rush to see it (and have binoculars at work).

But there was something wrong with this owl. It sat perched only three metres off the ground, on a tree with no foliage.

“It was completely exposed and close to the ground – you wouldn’t usually see a nocturnal bird displaying that kind of behaviour,” says Birdlife campaigns advisor Andrew Hunter.

Later that day a passerby found it dead under a tree in a nearby park. Hunter, who is also a wildlife rescuer, wanted to get the owl’s body checked for poisoning from anticoagulant rodenticides, or rodent poisons.

So he took it back to the office freezer – used for keeping bird carcasses that will be taxidermied for educational purposes – and arranged for veterinary students at Melbourne University to do a pro bono dissection.

This found large haemorrhages under the skin and in the muscle of the owl’s keel, extending down the length of the left wing and around the carpus (wrist) of the right wing.

The tissues also had very high levels of of the anti-coagulant brodifacoum, enough to cause toxicity and account for the haemorrhages, the dissection report showed.

For Hunter and the other Birdlife staff, it was a first-hand experience of an issue their organisation has been campaigning on for years: the lethal effect of anticoagulant rodenticides, also called second-generation rat poisons, on birds like owls, kites and other birds of prey.

The Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority is currently examining these rodenticides on the basis of concerns for worker exposure, public health and environmental safety.

Birds like boobook owls and black-winged kites can devour multiple rats and mice that have taken bait, says BirdLife Australia’s Sean Dooley. And because the poison takes some time to work, the poisoned rats are like “walking time-bombs”.

It’s a long and painful death for the birds, Dooley says. “These second-generation poisons don’t break down quickly – some can stay in tissues and organs for months, even years.” They can also cause birds to become disorientated, meaning they are more likely to crash into structures and vehicles.

These household products have been banned in some jurisdictions in the US and Europe, but are available from Australian supermarkets and hardware stores. They work by inhibiting Vitamin K in the body and disrupting the normal coagulation process. Poisoned animals suffer from uncontrolled hemorrhaging.

Professional pesticide users would prefer anticoagulant rodenticides were taken off retail shelves and made less accessible to the public, says Eris Hess, associate director of the Australian Environmental Pest Managers Association.

“The real question is why the bird is able to access the rodent. The general public is buying off supermarket shelves and using it incorrectly,” Mr Hess said. Professional users know they should collect the carcasses afterwards, he said.

The association would like a licence required for use, perhaps the safe chemical users licence, which most farmers already have.

All second-generation rodenticides should also be used in bait boxes to contain pests that have ingested poison, so they are not a risk to other animals or children, Mr Hess said.

2003: Patawalonga Weir Sediment (South Australia). Pesticides: Aldrin, Chlordane, DDD, DDE, Total DDT, Chlorpyrifos

2003: Patawalonga Weir (South Australia) Sediment

Aldrin 5.5μg/kg, Chlordane 4.6μg/kg, DDD 16.6μg/kg, DDE 4.6μg/kg, Total DDT 27.6μg/kg, Chlorpyrifos 61μg/kg

EPA South Australia. A snapshot of pesticides in South Australian aquatic sediments. Clive Jenkins March 2013. https://www.epa.sa.gov.au/files/8537_aquatic_pesticides.pdf

2003/09: Cox Creek Sediment (South Australia). Pesticides: Chlordane, DDE, Dieldrin, Simazine, DDD, DDT

2003/09: Cox Creek (South Australia) Sediment

2003: Chlordane 2.8μg/kg, DDE 35μg/kg, Dieldrin 4.1μg/kg, Simazine 40μg/kg

2009: DDD 6.8μg/kg, DDE 61μg/kg, DDT 15 μg/kg

EPA South Australia. A snapshot of pesticides in South Australian aquatic sediments. Clive Jenkins March 2013. https://www.epa.sa.gov.au/files/8537_aquatic_pesticides.pdf

2000-2003 Merah North Farm Soil (New South Wales). Pesticides: Endrin, DDE, Endosulfan, Endosulfan Sulphate

2000-2003 Merah North – Soils

Pesticides detected in soil to a depth of 1.2m: Endrin, DDE, Endosulfan, Endosulfan Sulfate

Organochlorine pesticides in soil under irrigated cotton farming systems in Vertisols of the Namoi Valley, north-western New South Wales,Australia

Author: Weaver, Timothy B, Ghadiri, Hossein, Hulugalle, Nilantha R, Harden, Stephen

https://research-repository.griffith.edu.au/bitstream/handle/10072/48782/82240_1.pdf?sequence=1

2000-2003 Wee Waa Farm (New South Wales). Pesticides: Endrin, DDT, DDE, DDD, Endosulfan, Endosulfan Sulfate

2000-2003 Wee Waa – Soils

Pesticides detected in soil to a depth of 1.2m: Endrin, DDT, DDE, DDD, Endosulfan, Endosulfan Sulfate

Organochlorine pesticides in soil under irrigated cotton farming systems in Vertisols of the Namoi Valley, north-western New South Wales,Australia

Author: Weaver, Timothy B, Ghadiri, Hossein, Hulugalle, Nilantha R, Harden, Stephen

https://research-repository.griffith.edu.au/bitstream/handle/10072/48782/82240_1.pdf?sequence=1

2000-03: Australian Cotton Research Institute Soils (NSW). Pesticides: Endrin, DDT, DDE, DDD, Endosulfan, Endosulfan Sulfate

2000-2003 Australian Cotton Research Institute – Soils

Pesticides detected in soil to a depth of 1.2m: Endrin, DDT, DDE, DDD, Endosulfan, Endosulfan Sulfate

Organochlorine pesticides in soil under irrigated cotton farming systems in Vertisols of the Namoi Valley, north-western New South Wales,Australia

Author: Weaver, Timothy B, Ghadiri, Hossein, Hulugalle, Nilantha R, Harden, Stephen

https://research-repository.griffith.edu.au/bitstream/handle/10072/48782/82240_1.pdf?sequence=1

2002: Namoi Valley (NSW) DDE residues remaining in Soil

2002 – Namoi Valley (NSW) Levels of DDE remaining in soil

Fig. 1.  GIS distribution of DDE residues in Namoi Valley topsoil (0.10 cm). Reproduced with permission from the American Chemical Society (Shivaramaiah et al. 2002). Unwanted legacies such as this justified the transition to chemicals with shorter half-lives, including endosulfan.

https://www.publish.csiro.au/CP/fulltext/CP13091

1997: Wagga Wagga (NSW). Shearers Awarded $613,000 Exposure to OP Pesticide Applied to Sheep

1997 Wagga Wagga (NSW) Health impacts of OP Pesticide on Sheep

p41 “…Statistics for pesticide poisonings do not represent a large percentage of the overall number of injuries that occur in the agricultural industry; however, the cost of some of these claims can be significant. For example, three shearers in Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, were awarded $613,144.00 in October 1997 for health effects associated with exposure to OP pesticide applied to sheep (Dips, 2000). There are also growing health and safety concerns, in the industry and the general community regarding the use of pesticides.

Source: https://eprints.qut.edu.au/16345/1/Kelly_Johnstone_Thesis.pdf

Organophosphate Exposure in Australian Agricultural Workers: Human Exposure and Risk Assessment. Kelly Johnstone Bachelor of Applied Science (Occupational Health and Safety) Bachelor of Health Sciences (Honours)

2020 July: Darlington Point (NSW) Spray Drift

Chemicals the most likely cause of mystery leaf loss in cotton towns, secret report finds

July 28 2020

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/chemicals-the-most-likely-cause-of-mystery-leaf-loss-in-cotton-towns-secret-report-finds-20200726-p55fjk.html

Chemicals used in cotton farming are the most likely cause of trees losing their leaves in parts of central western NSW and may pose a threat to human health, according to a government report that has been blocked from the public since it was circulated internally two years ago.

The report by a technical specialist within the NSW Department of Industry is the first official analysis of a phenomenon that has mystified and troubled graziers around Narromine, Trangie and Warren, as far south as Darlington Point near Hay and as far north as Bourke.

The peppercorn, which is an exotic evergreen, and certain species of eucalyptus drop their leaves annually at a time that coincides with cotton farmers using aerial spray to defoliate their crop, raising concerns about other potential harms caused by exposure to the chemicals.

But the notion that spray drift might be responsible for denuding the trees is contentious in the state’s cotton belt. Narromine mayor Craig Davies, a former spray contractor, says leaf drop is caused by the drought.

The NSW Environment Protection Agency has repeatedly told complainants that the only way to prove spray drift is the cause of non-target species losing their leaves is to conduct tests within two days of the spray activity, which may be before the symptoms have appeared.

However, the NSW Department of Industry report, obtained by the Herald under freedom of information laws, concluded in May 2018 that the leaf loss was “definitely not a result of environmental conditions such as prolonged dry weather”.

“It was most likely the result of a large area spraying with temperature inversions moving fine particles of chemicals further than would be expected … Symptoms of peppercorn trees were not apparent in other non-cotton growing areas.”

The risks of spray drift included: conflict between farmer groups, the prospect of legal action, the potential for people to be selling produce with trace residue, and human health impacts as there were “unknown effects of chemical especially with low dose longer time exposures”. The report recommended a community mediation chaired by an independent person to minimise community unrest and reduce spray drift the next season.

But Bruce Maynard, a spokesman for the Lower Macquarie Overspray Group, said this had not occurred.

“The peppercorn trees are showing clear evidence that we’re being exposed to something on an annual basis and it’s across all our areas and towns,” Mr Maynard said. “In the long run, this is about two things: health and also our businesses, because we are at risk for things outside our control.”

The report did not name the chemicals that might have drifted off target. Cotton defoliants include the chemicals Thidiazuron, Dimethipin and Diuron, which has been linked to damage in the Great Barrier Reef and is proposed to be deregistered in the European Union from September.

Grazier Colin Hamilton said the leaf drop put beef producers in a difficult position when they had to declare their pasture free from contaminants because there was no confirmation that chemicals were present but the evidence suggested otherwise.

“But closer to home, the majority of people in our area drink the rainwater that runs off their roof,” Mr Hamilton said. “There’s the potential for human health impacts.”

However, Cotton Australia chief executive Adam Kay said there was “zero evidence” that agricultural chemicals were responsible for the leaf drop. Preventing off-target spray drift was a priority across agriculture to ensure the safety of communities and environments.

“The use of biotechnology and integrated pest management in cotton has reduced pesticide use by 95 per cent since 1993,” Mr Kay said.

The mayor’s contention that the drought was more likely to blame was also supported by Leslie Weston, a professor of plant biology at Charles Sturt University. Some of the affected trees were 10 kilometres from the nearest cotton farm.

“I don’t personally think that this particular herbicide would be killing trees unless they bordered the field and off-site spray was occurring, allowing root uptake or translocation from shoots,” Professor Weston said. “If herbicide damage was prevalent, one would typically also see damage on citrus or other perennials growing nearby.”

The NSW Environment Protection Agency said it had conducted three vegetation and water tests in the Narromine and Trangie areas in the past two years and no pesticides had been detected, but it was important for overspray complaints to be made within two days because the residue dissipated quickly.

“The EPA has committed to undertake pre- and post-spray inspections coming into the next spray season, to check the condition of vegetation and to collect vegetation samples for testing immediately after spraying,” an EPA spokesman said.

The chemical report Cotton Australia will not release

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/the-chemical-report-cotton-australia-will-not-release-20200728-p55gak.html

July 29 2020

The peak cotton industry body is refusing to release a report into the cause of trees losing their leaves in the central west of NSW, despite saying there was no evidence chemical sprays were to blame.

Graziers around the towns of Trangie, Warren and Narromine are concerned that some of the chemicals used in cotton farming are drifting off target, affecting other plant species and potentially compromising their health in an area reliant on rainwater for drinking.

A technical specialist from the NSW Department of Industry inspected the area in May 2018 and noted moderate to major leaf drop among peppercorn trees and lesser damage to cadaghi and lemon-scented eucalyptus, which was “most likely a result of large area spraying”.

The report was kept secret until obtained by the Herald under freedom of information laws. Cotton Australia chief executive Adam Kay said it contained “zero evidence” that agricultural chemicals were involved.

Cotton Australia did its own investigations around the same time in response to community concerns, commissioning a researcher from the University of New England to inspect.

But it has declined to release the report, despite numerous requests from the Lower Macquarie Overspray Group, which represents concerned locals.

Mr Kay said the inspection was not a formal investigation.

“We were provided some advice, but no samples were taken for chemical testing because it was too far after the alleged event and this is the job of the NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA),” he said.

“This work by the researcher was in no means a formal report.”

However, a farmer whose property the researcher visited said samples were taken from his premises and several others.

“[The researcher] took three samples from my property and I phoned three times but the report has never seen the light of day,” said the farmer, who asked not to be named because he feared retribution in the close-knit cotton community. “We’ve got to get to the bottom of these reports.”

National Toxics Network co-ordinator Jo Immig said spray could drift up to 20 kilometres in inversion levels. The EPA should have obtained spray application records to find out what chemicals were being applied, she said.

“The idea that pesticides can be applied safely to paddocks and not move ‘off target’ is perhaps one of the greatest cons perpetrated by the chemical industry and regulators on the Australian public and environment,” Ms Immig said. “All ecological systems are inter-connected via the atmosphere, water and soil.”

 

2020 July: Bourke (NSW). Spray Drift

Chemicals the most likely cause of mystery leaf loss in cotton towns, secret report finds

July 28 2020

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/chemicals-the-most-likely-cause-of-mystery-leaf-loss-in-cotton-towns-secret-report-finds-20200726-p55fjk.html

Chemicals used in cotton farming are the most likely cause of trees losing their leaves in parts of central western NSW and may pose a threat to human health, according to a government report that has been blocked from the public since it was circulated internally two years ago.

The report by a technical specialist within the NSW Department of Industry is the first official analysis of a phenomenon that has mystified and troubled graziers around Narromine, Trangie and Warren, as far south as Darlington Point near Hay and as far north as Bourke.

The peppercorn, which is an exotic evergreen, and certain species of eucalyptus drop their leaves annually at a time that coincides with cotton farmers using aerial spray to defoliate their crop, raising concerns about other potential harms caused by exposure to the chemicals.

But the notion that spray drift might be responsible for denuding the trees is contentious in the state’s cotton belt. Narromine mayor Craig Davies, a former spray contractor, says leaf drop is caused by the drought.

The NSW Environment Protection Agency has repeatedly told complainants that the only way to prove spray drift is the cause of non-target species losing their leaves is to conduct tests within two days of the spray activity, which may be before the symptoms have appeared.

However, the NSW Department of Industry report, obtained by the Herald under freedom of information laws, concluded in May 2018 that the leaf loss was “definitely not a result of environmental conditions such as prolonged dry weather”.

“It was most likely the result of a large area spraying with temperature inversions moving fine particles of chemicals further than would be expected … Symptoms of peppercorn trees were not apparent in other non-cotton growing areas.”

The risks of spray drift included: conflict between farmer groups, the prospect of legal action, the potential for people to be selling produce with trace residue, and human health impacts as there were “unknown effects of chemical especially with low dose longer time exposures”. The report recommended a community mediation chaired by an independent person to minimise community unrest and reduce spray drift the next season.

But Bruce Maynard, a spokesman for the Lower Macquarie Overspray Group, said this had not occurred.

“The peppercorn trees are showing clear evidence that we’re being exposed to something on an annual basis and it’s across all our areas and towns,” Mr Maynard said. “In the long run, this is about two things: health and also our businesses, because we are at risk for things outside our control.”

The report did not name the chemicals that might have drifted off target. Cotton defoliants include the chemicals Thidiazuron, Dimethipin and Diuron, which has been linked to damage in the Great Barrier Reef and is proposed to be deregistered in the European Union from September.

Grazier Colin Hamilton said the leaf drop put beef producers in a difficult position when they had to declare their pasture free from contaminants because there was no confirmation that chemicals were present but the evidence suggested otherwise.

“But closer to home, the majority of people in our area drink the rainwater that runs off their roof,” Mr Hamilton said. “There’s the potential for human health impacts.”

However, Cotton Australia chief executive Adam Kay said there was “zero evidence” that agricultural chemicals were responsible for the leaf drop. Preventing off-target spray drift was a priority across agriculture to ensure the safety of communities and environments.

“The use of biotechnology and integrated pest management in cotton has reduced pesticide use by 95 per cent since 1993,” Mr Kay said.

The mayor’s contention that the drought was more likely to blame was also supported by Leslie Weston, a professor of plant biology at Charles Sturt University. Some of the affected trees were 10 kilometres from the nearest cotton farm.

“I don’t personally think that this particular herbicide would be killing trees unless they bordered the field and off-site spray was occurring, allowing root uptake or translocation from shoots,” Professor Weston said. “If herbicide damage was prevalent, one would typically also see damage on citrus or other perennials growing nearby.”

The NSW Environment Protection Agency said it had conducted three vegetation and water tests in the Narromine and Trangie areas in the past two years and no pesticides had been detected, but it was important for overspray complaints to be made within two days because the residue dissipated quickly.

“The EPA has committed to undertake pre- and post-spray inspections coming into the next spray season, to check the condition of vegetation and to collect vegetation samples for testing immediately after spraying,” an EPA spokesman said.

The chemical report Cotton Australia will not release

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/the-chemical-report-cotton-australia-will-not-release-20200728-p55gak.html

July 29 2020

The peak cotton industry body is refusing to release a report into the cause of trees losing their leaves in the central west of NSW, despite saying there was no evidence chemical sprays were to blame.

Graziers around the towns of Trangie, Warren and Narromine are concerned that some of the chemicals used in cotton farming are drifting off target, affecting other plant species and potentially compromising their health in an area reliant on rainwater for drinking.

A technical specialist from the NSW Department of Industry inspected the area in May 2018 and noted moderate to major leaf drop among peppercorn trees and lesser damage to cadaghi and lemon-scented eucalyptus, which was “most likely a result of large area spraying”.

The report was kept secret until obtained by the Herald under freedom of information laws. Cotton Australia chief executive Adam Kay said it contained “zero evidence” that agricultural chemicals were involved.

Cotton Australia did its own investigations around the same time in response to community concerns, commissioning a researcher from the University of New England to inspect.

But it has declined to release the report, despite numerous requests from the Lower Macquarie Overspray Group, which represents concerned locals.

Mr Kay said the inspection was not a formal investigation.

“We were provided some advice, but no samples were taken for chemical testing because it was too far after the alleged event and this is the job of the NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA),” he said.

“This work by the researcher was in no means a formal report.”

However, a farmer whose property the researcher visited said samples were taken from his premises and several others.

“[The researcher] took three samples from my property and I phoned three times but the report has never seen the light of day,” said the farmer, who asked not to be named because he feared retribution in the close-knit cotton community. “We’ve got to get to the bottom of these reports.”

National Toxics Network co-ordinator Jo Immig said spray could drift up to 20 kilometres in inversion levels. The EPA should have obtained spray application records to find out what chemicals were being applied, she said.

“The idea that pesticides can be applied safely to paddocks and not move ‘off target’ is perhaps one of the greatest cons perpetrated by the chemical industry and regulators on the Australian public and environment,” Ms Immig said. “All ecological systems are inter-connected via the atmosphere, water and soil.”

 

2020 July: Narrowmine (NSW). Spray Drift Impacting Peppercorns

Chemicals the most likely cause of mystery leaf loss in cotton towns, secret report finds

July 28 2020

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/chemicals-the-most-likely-cause-of-mystery-leaf-loss-in-cotton-towns-secret-report-finds-20200726-p55fjk.html

Chemicals used in cotton farming are the most likely cause of trees losing their leaves in parts of central western NSW and may pose a threat to human health, according to a government report that has been blocked from the public since it was circulated internally two years ago.

The report by a technical specialist within the NSW Department of Industry is the first official analysis of a phenomenon that has mystified and troubled graziers around Narromine, Trangie and Warren, as far south as Darlington Point near Hay and as far north as Bourke.

The peppercorn, which is an exotic evergreen, and certain species of eucalyptus drop their leaves annually at a time that coincides with cotton farmers using aerial spray to defoliate their crop, raising concerns about other potential harms caused by exposure to the chemicals.

But the notion that spray drift might be responsible for denuding the trees is contentious in the state’s cotton belt. Narromine mayor Craig Davies, a former spray contractor, says leaf drop is caused by the drought.

The NSW Environment Protection Agency has repeatedly told complainants that the only way to prove spray drift is the cause of non-target species losing their leaves is to conduct tests within two days of the spray activity, which may be before the symptoms have appeared.

However, the NSW Department of Industry report, obtained by the Herald under freedom of information laws, concluded in May 2018 that the leaf loss was “definitely not a result of environmental conditions such as prolonged dry weather”.

“It was most likely the result of a large area spraying with temperature inversions moving fine particles of chemicals further than would be expected … Symptoms of peppercorn trees were not apparent in other non-cotton growing areas.”

The risks of spray drift included: conflict between farmer groups, the prospect of legal action, the potential for people to be selling produce with trace residue, and human health impacts as there were “unknown effects of chemical especially with low dose longer time exposures”. The report recommended a community mediation chaired by an independent person to minimise community unrest and reduce spray drift the next season.

But Bruce Maynard, a spokesman for the Lower Macquarie Overspray Group, said this had not occurred.

“The peppercorn trees are showing clear evidence that we’re being exposed to something on an annual basis and it’s across all our areas and towns,” Mr Maynard said. “In the long run, this is about two things: health and also our businesses, because we are at risk for things outside our control.”

The report did not name the chemicals that might have drifted off target. Cotton defoliants include the chemicals Thidiazuron, Dimethipin and Diuron, which has been linked to damage in the Great Barrier Reef and is proposed to be deregistered in the European Union from September.

Grazier Colin Hamilton said the leaf drop put beef producers in a difficult position when they had to declare their pasture free from contaminants because there was no confirmation that chemicals were present but the evidence suggested otherwise.

“But closer to home, the majority of people in our area drink the rainwater that runs off their roof,” Mr Hamilton said. “There’s the potential for human health impacts.”

However, Cotton Australia chief executive Adam Kay said there was “zero evidence” that agricultural chemicals were responsible for the leaf drop. Preventing off-target spray drift was a priority across agriculture to ensure the safety of communities and environments.

“The use of biotechnology and integrated pest management in cotton has reduced pesticide use by 95 per cent since 1993,” Mr Kay said.

The mayor’s contention that the drought was more likely to blame was also supported by Leslie Weston, a professor of plant biology at Charles Sturt University. Some of the affected trees were 10 kilometres from the nearest cotton farm.

“I don’t personally think that this particular herbicide would be killing trees unless they bordered the field and off-site spray was occurring, allowing root uptake or translocation from shoots,” Professor Weston said. “If herbicide damage was prevalent, one would typically also see damage on citrus or other perennials growing nearby.”

The NSW Environment Protection Agency said it had conducted three vegetation and water tests in the Narromine and Trangie areas in the past two years and no pesticides had been detected, but it was important for overspray complaints to be made within two days because the residue dissipated quickly.

“The EPA has committed to undertake pre- and post-spray inspections coming into the next spray season, to check the condition of vegetation and to collect vegetation samples for testing immediately after spraying,” an EPA spokesman said.

The chemical report Cotton Australia will not release

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/the-chemical-report-cotton-australia-will-not-release-20200728-p55gak.html

July 29 2020

The peak cotton industry body is refusing to release a report into the cause of trees losing their leaves in the central west of NSW, despite saying there was no evidence chemical sprays were to blame.

Graziers around the towns of Trangie, Warren and Narromine are concerned that some of the chemicals used in cotton farming are drifting off target, affecting other plant species and potentially compromising their health in an area reliant on rainwater for drinking.

A technical specialist from the NSW Department of Industry inspected the area in May 2018 and noted moderate to major leaf drop among peppercorn trees and lesser damage to cadaghi and lemon-scented eucalyptus, which was “most likely a result of large area spraying”.

The report was kept secret until obtained by the Herald under freedom of information laws. Cotton Australia chief executive Adam Kay said it contained “zero evidence” that agricultural chemicals were involved.

Cotton Australia did its own investigations around the same time in response to community concerns, commissioning a researcher from the University of New England to inspect.

But it has declined to release the report, despite numerous requests from the Lower Macquarie Overspray Group, which represents concerned locals.

Mr Kay said the inspection was not a formal investigation.

“We were provided some advice, but no samples were taken for chemical testing because it was too far after the alleged event and this is the job of the NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA),” he said.

“This work by the researcher was in no means a formal report.”

However, a farmer whose property the researcher visited said samples were taken from his premises and several others.

“[The researcher] took three samples from my property and I phoned three times but the report has never seen the light of day,” said the farmer, who asked not to be named because he feared retribution in the close-knit cotton community. “We’ve got to get to the bottom of these reports.”

National Toxics Network co-ordinator Jo Immig said spray could drift up to 20 kilometres in inversion levels. The EPA should have obtained spray application records to find out what chemicals were being applied, she said.

“The idea that pesticides can be applied safely to paddocks and not move ‘off target’ is perhaps one of the greatest cons perpetrated by the chemical industry and regulators on the Australian public and environment,” Ms Immig said. “All ecological systems are inter-connected via the atmosphere, water and soil.”

 

2020 July: Warren (NSW). Spray Drift Impacting Peppercorns

Chemicals the most likely cause of mystery leaf loss in cotton towns, secret report finds

July 28 2020

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/chemicals-the-most-likely-cause-of-mystery-leaf-loss-in-cotton-towns-secret-report-finds-20200726-p55fjk.html

Chemicals used in cotton farming are the most likely cause of trees losing their leaves in parts of central western NSW and may pose a threat to human health, according to a government report that has been blocked from the public since it was circulated internally two years ago.

The report by a technical specialist within the NSW Department of Industry is the first official analysis of a phenomenon that has mystified and troubled graziers around Narromine, Trangie and Warren, as far south as Darlington Point near Hay and as far north as Bourke.

The peppercorn, which is an exotic evergreen, and certain species of eucalyptus drop their leaves annually at a time that coincides with cotton farmers using aerial spray to defoliate their crop, raising concerns about other potential harms caused by exposure to the chemicals.

But the notion that spray drift might be responsible for denuding the trees is contentious in the state’s cotton belt. Narromine mayor Craig Davies, a former spray contractor, says leaf drop is caused by the drought.

The NSW Environment Protection Agency has repeatedly told complainants that the only way to prove spray drift is the cause of non-target species losing their leaves is to conduct tests within two days of the spray activity, which may be before the symptoms have appeared.

However, the NSW Department of Industry report, obtained by the Herald under freedom of information laws, concluded in May 2018 that the leaf loss was “definitely not a result of environmental conditions such as prolonged dry weather”.

“It was most likely the result of a large area spraying with temperature inversions moving fine particles of chemicals further than would be expected … Symptoms of peppercorn trees were not apparent in other non-cotton growing areas.”

The risks of spray drift included: conflict between farmer groups, the prospect of legal action, the potential for people to be selling produce with trace residue, and human health impacts as there were “unknown effects of chemical especially with low dose longer time exposures”. The report recommended a community mediation chaired by an independent person to minimise community unrest and reduce spray drift the next season.

But Bruce Maynard, a spokesman for the Lower Macquarie Overspray Group, said this had not occurred.

“The peppercorn trees are showing clear evidence that we’re being exposed to something on an annual basis and it’s across all our areas and towns,” Mr Maynard said. “In the long run, this is about two things: health and also our businesses, because we are at risk for things outside our control.”

The report did not name the chemicals that might have drifted off target. Cotton defoliants include the chemicals Thidiazuron, Dimethipin and Diuron, which has been linked to damage in the Great Barrier Reef and is proposed to be deregistered in the European Union from September.

Grazier Colin Hamilton said the leaf drop put beef producers in a difficult position when they had to declare their pasture free from contaminants because there was no confirmation that chemicals were present but the evidence suggested otherwise.

“But closer to home, the majority of people in our area drink the rainwater that runs off their roof,” Mr Hamilton said. “There’s the potential for human health impacts.”

However, Cotton Australia chief executive Adam Kay said there was “zero evidence” that agricultural chemicals were responsible for the leaf drop. Preventing off-target spray drift was a priority across agriculture to ensure the safety of communities and environments.

“The use of biotechnology and integrated pest management in cotton has reduced pesticide use by 95 per cent since 1993,” Mr Kay said.

The mayor’s contention that the drought was more likely to blame was also supported by Leslie Weston, a professor of plant biology at Charles Sturt University. Some of the affected trees were 10 kilometres from the nearest cotton farm.

“I don’t personally think that this particular herbicide would be killing trees unless they bordered the field and off-site spray was occurring, allowing root uptake or translocation from shoots,” Professor Weston said. “If herbicide damage was prevalent, one would typically also see damage on citrus or other perennials growing nearby.”

The NSW Environment Protection Agency said it had conducted three vegetation and water tests in the Narromine and Trangie areas in the past two years and no pesticides had been detected, but it was important for overspray complaints to be made within two days because the residue dissipated quickly.

“The EPA has committed to undertake pre- and post-spray inspections coming into the next spray season, to check the condition of vegetation and to collect vegetation samples for testing immediately after spraying,” an EPA spokesman said.

The chemical report Cotton Australia will not release

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/the-chemical-report-cotton-australia-will-not-release-20200728-p55gak.html

July 29 2020

The peak cotton industry body is refusing to release a report into the cause of trees losing their leaves in the central west of NSW, despite saying there was no evidence chemical sprays were to blame.

Graziers around the towns of Trangie, Warren and Narromine are concerned that some of the chemicals used in cotton farming are drifting off target, affecting other plant species and potentially compromising their health in an area reliant on rainwater for drinking.

A technical specialist from the NSW Department of Industry inspected the area in May 2018 and noted moderate to major leaf drop among peppercorn trees and lesser damage to cadaghi and lemon-scented eucalyptus, which was “most likely a result of large area spraying”.

The report was kept secret until obtained by the Herald under freedom of information laws. Cotton Australia chief executive Adam Kay said it contained “zero evidence” that agricultural chemicals were involved.

Cotton Australia did its own investigations around the same time in response to community concerns, commissioning a researcher from the University of New England to inspect.

But it has declined to release the report, despite numerous requests from the Lower Macquarie Overspray Group, which represents concerned locals.

Mr Kay said the inspection was not a formal investigation.

“We were provided some advice, but no samples were taken for chemical testing because it was too far after the alleged event and this is the job of the NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA),” he said.

“This work by the researcher was in no means a formal report.”

However, a farmer whose property the researcher visited said samples were taken from his premises and several others.

“[The researcher] took three samples from my property and I phoned three times but the report has never seen the light of day,” said the farmer, who asked not to be named because he feared retribution in the close-knit cotton community. “We’ve got to get to the bottom of these reports.”

National Toxics Network co-ordinator Jo Immig said spray could drift up to 20 kilometres in inversion levels. The EPA should have obtained spray application records to find out what chemicals were being applied, she said.

“The idea that pesticides can be applied safely to paddocks and not move ‘off target’ is perhaps one of the greatest cons perpetrated by the chemical industry and regulators on the Australian public and environment,” Ms Immig said. “All ecological systems are inter-connected via the atmosphere, water and soil.”

 

2020 July: Trangie (NSW). Spray Drift Impacting Peppercorns

Chemicals the most likely cause of mystery leaf loss in cotton towns, secret report finds

July 28 2020

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/chemicals-the-most-likely-cause-of-mystery-leaf-loss-in-cotton-towns-secret-report-finds-20200726-p55fjk.html

Chemicals used in cotton farming are the most likely cause of trees losing their leaves in parts of central western NSW and may pose a threat to human health, according to a government report that has been blocked from the public since it was circulated internally two years ago.

The report by a technical specialist within the NSW Department of Industry is the first official analysis of a phenomenon that has mystified and troubled graziers around Narromine, Trangie and Warren, as far south as Darlington Point near Hay and as far north as Bourke.

The peppercorn, which is an exotic evergreen, and certain species of eucalyptus drop their leaves annually at a time that coincides with cotton farmers using aerial spray to defoliate their crop, raising concerns about other potential harms caused by exposure to the chemicals.

But the notion that spray drift might be responsible for denuding the trees is contentious in the state’s cotton belt. Narromine mayor Craig Davies, a former spray contractor, says leaf drop is caused by the drought.

The NSW Environment Protection Agency has repeatedly told complainants that the only way to prove spray drift is the cause of non-target species losing their leaves is to conduct tests within two days of the spray activity, which may be before the symptoms have appeared.

However, the NSW Department of Industry report, obtained by the Herald under freedom of information laws, concluded in May 2018 that the leaf loss was “definitely not a result of environmental conditions such as prolonged dry weather”.

“It was most likely the result of a large area spraying with temperature inversions moving fine particles of chemicals further than would be expected … Symptoms of peppercorn trees were not apparent in other non-cotton growing areas.”

The risks of spray drift included: conflict between farmer groups, the prospect of legal action, the potential for people to be selling produce with trace residue, and human health impacts as there were “unknown effects of chemical especially with low dose longer time exposures”. The report recommended a community mediation chaired by an independent person to minimise community unrest and reduce spray drift the next season.

But Bruce Maynard, a spokesman for the Lower Macquarie Overspray Group, said this had not occurred.

“The peppercorn trees are showing clear evidence that we’re being exposed to something on an annual basis and it’s across all our areas and towns,” Mr Maynard said. “In the long run, this is about two things: health and also our businesses, because we are at risk for things outside our control.”

The report did not name the chemicals that might have drifted off target. Cotton defoliants include the chemicals Thidiazuron, Dimethipin and Diuron, which has been linked to damage in the Great Barrier Reef and is proposed to be deregistered in the European Union from September.

Grazier Colin Hamilton said the leaf drop put beef producers in a difficult position when they had to declare their pasture free from contaminants because there was no confirmation that chemicals were present but the evidence suggested otherwise.

“But closer to home, the majority of people in our area drink the rainwater that runs off their roof,” Mr Hamilton said. “There’s the potential for human health impacts.”

However, Cotton Australia chief executive Adam Kay said there was “zero evidence” that agricultural chemicals were responsible for the leaf drop. Preventing off-target spray drift was a priority across agriculture to ensure the safety of communities and environments.

“The use of biotechnology and integrated pest management in cotton has reduced pesticide use by 95 per cent since 1993,” Mr Kay said.

The mayor’s contention that the drought was more likely to blame was also supported by Leslie Weston, a professor of plant biology at Charles Sturt University. Some of the affected trees were 10 kilometres from the nearest cotton farm.

“I don’t personally think that this particular herbicide would be killing trees unless they bordered the field and off-site spray was occurring, allowing root uptake or translocation from shoots,” Professor Weston said. “If herbicide damage was prevalent, one would typically also see damage on citrus or other perennials growing nearby.”

The NSW Environment Protection Agency said it had conducted three vegetation and water tests in the Narromine and Trangie areas in the past two years and no pesticides had been detected, but it was important for overspray complaints to be made within two days because the residue dissipated quickly.

“The EPA has committed to undertake pre- and post-spray inspections coming into the next spray season, to check the condition of vegetation and to collect vegetation samples for testing immediately after spraying,” an EPA spokesman said.

The chemical report Cotton Australia will not release

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/the-chemical-report-cotton-australia-will-not-release-20200728-p55gak.html

July 29 2020

The peak cotton industry body is refusing to release a report into the cause of trees losing their leaves in the central west of NSW, despite saying there was no evidence chemical sprays were to blame.

Graziers around the towns of Trangie, Warren and Narromine are concerned that some of the chemicals used in cotton farming are drifting off target, affecting other plant species and potentially compromising their health in an area reliant on rainwater for drinking.

A technical specialist from the NSW Department of Industry inspected the area in May 2018 and noted moderate to major leaf drop among peppercorn trees and lesser damage to cadaghi and lemon-scented eucalyptus, which was “most likely a result of large area spraying”.

The report was kept secret until obtained by the Herald under freedom of information laws. Cotton Australia chief executive Adam Kay said it contained “zero evidence” that agricultural chemicals were involved.

Cotton Australia did its own investigations around the same time in response to community concerns, commissioning a researcher from the University of New England to inspect.

But it has declined to release the report, despite numerous requests from the Lower Macquarie Overspray Group, which represents concerned locals.

Mr Kay said the inspection was not a formal investigation.

“We were provided some advice, but no samples were taken for chemical testing because it was too far after the alleged event and this is the job of the NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA),” he said.

“This work by the researcher was in no means a formal report.”

However, a farmer whose property the researcher visited said samples were taken from his premises and several others.

“[The researcher] took three samples from my property and I phoned three times but the report has never seen the light of day,” said the farmer, who asked not to be named because he feared retribution in the close-knit cotton community. “We’ve got to get to the bottom of these reports.”

National Toxics Network co-ordinator Jo Immig said spray could drift up to 20 kilometres in inversion levels. The EPA should have obtained spray application records to find out what chemicals were being applied, she said.

“The idea that pesticides can be applied safely to paddocks and not move ‘off target’ is perhaps one of the greatest cons perpetrated by the chemical industry and regulators on the Australian public and environment,” Ms Immig said. “All ecological systems are inter-connected via the atmosphere, water and soil.”

 

2020 June: Holey Plains State Park Spray Drift from Pine Plantation. Pesticides: Glyphosate?, Metsulfuron Methyl?

Thousands of Trees in Reserve Threatened by Herbicide Spray Drift

https://www.foe.org.au/thousands_of_trees_in_reserve_threatened_by_herbicide_spray_drift

Friends of the Earth has uncovered a disturbing incident in the Holey Plains State Reserve, in Central Gippsland, Victoria. FoE has found an area of several hundred hectares, in the Reserve which appears to have been impacted by spray drift from an adjacent pine plantation which was recently aerially sprayed. Thousands of trees appear to have been impacted. The trees were slowly recovering after being severely burnt by bushfires which ravaged Holey Plains in early 2019.

The area was recently being visited by Friends of the Earth during koala surveys. The impact of the sprays can be seen mainly on a 2km front on the eastern side of the plantation indicating that herbicides are likely to have wafted in when a 500ha pine plantation, managed by Hancock Victorian Plantations was recently sprayed. This plantation is certified by Forest Stewardship Council.

Pine plantations of this size are usually aerially sprayed with herbicides including Glyphosate, Metsulfuron Methyl and Clopyralid. Another herbicide Glufosinate Ammonium is also sometimes used. After the pines have been established for a year or two, aerial application of pellitised Hexazinone then occurs. Hexazinone will then leach into the soil for a many months.

Friends of the Earth believes that the likely culprit of the spray drift is Glyphosate. A similar incident occurred in the King Lake National Park about 10 years ago. It was determined that coppicing eucalypts are highly susceptible to minute levels of Glyphosate. It is unclear whether the trees impacted at Holey Plains will survive the incident.

The incident also raises concerns about the use of herbicides near recently burnt areas along the eastern seaboard of the Australian continent after the massive bushfire disaster which occurred in late 2019/2020. FoE believes that there should be label changes made to the herbicide Glyphosate listing concerns about its use in areas where Eucalypts are recovering from fire.

Chemical Standards Officers from Biosecurity and Agricultural Services (Victorian State Government) are now investigating the incident.

2018: Tully River (Queensland). Pesticide Shirtan (contains Mercury)

2018 Tully River Queensland. Mercury from use of Shirtan Fungicide

Evaluation of mercury in a freshwater environment impacted by an organomercury fungicide using diffusive gradient in thin films

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2017.10.081

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0048969717327845

“…Mercury was surveyed in soils close to the Tully River at 3 different depths (100, 200 and 300 mm). Additionally, total Hg (THg) and the labile fraction of Hg in water (measured by the diffusive gradient in thin film technique) were determined in the Tully River. A pristine site, the Tully Gorge National Park upstream of sugarcane fields, was selected for background Hg concentration estimation. In soils, Hg levels ranged from 18 to 264 μg kg− 1, with one of the soil samples being almost 10 times higher than at other sites at the surface level (199 μg kg− 1). Total and labile concentrations of Hg in water increased from the Hg-elevated soil sampling sites (0.085 μg L− 1 and 0.061 μg L− 1) to downstream sites (0.082 μg L− 1 and 0.066 μg L− 1), which is likely due to agricultural runoff. Indeed, except for the upstream control site, the THg concentration in water is over the limit permitted by the Australian freshwater quality guideline for protection of 99% species (0.06 μg L− 1). These findings point to the need to perform further research to reveal the mechanisms for release of Hg from soil and whether this might be causing important adverse effects to the Great Barrier Reef located in front of this river catchment…”

 

 

June 6 2020: TasNetworks (Hydro Electric Commission) Pay Pesticide Compensation. Pesticide: 2,4,5-T

TasNetworks to pay compensation over use of cancer-linked herbicide

June 6 2020

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-06-05/tasnetworks-hydro-worker-payout-herbicide-cancer/12324788

A man in his 60s and the family of another who died in the 1980s will receive compensation over historical exposure to a herbicide contaminant while they were employees of Tasmania’s Hydro Electric Commission (HEC).

The two men worked for the HEC, now TasNetworks, on vegetation teams using the herbicide 2,4,5-Trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) in the 1970s and 80s.

The dioxin TCDD, which is found in some batches of 2,4,5-T, has been linked to Hodgkin’s lymphoma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and soft-cell sarcoma, TasNetworks said in a statement.

TasNetworks said the man aged in his 60s was a current employee, while the other man had already left the HEC before his death.

Both men had contracted one of the linked illnesses, the statement said.

“We deeply regret that a current and former employee contracted a cancer linked to this herbicide,” TasNetworks CEO Lance Balcombe said.

“Our current team member affected will be compensated, and TasNetworks will take a strong, supportive role in his ongoing treatment,” he said, adding the employee would keep working at the company

The State Government last year confirmed WorkSafe Tasmania was working with TasNetworks to examine the claims of multiple former Hydro workers who said chemical exposure had left them with chronic illnesses.

TasNetworks on Friday said it had completed a “comprehensive search and screening process over 18 month, supported by independent toxicology and medical advice”.

Mr Balcombe said that of 400 past and present employees contacted, 70 had chosen to be tested and that all but the one current employee was clear of the three conditions.

“We’re confident we’ve reached the vast majority of people who could’ve been affected,” he said.

TasNetworks said compensation would be determined by a legal framework and would remain confidential.

Former boss told employees ‘you can drink it’

David Vince was one of hundreds of government workers who used the herbicide while working for Hydro Electric Commission’s vegetation teams — without wearing any protective gear.

“None whatsoever,” he said. “We just used to go out, mix it down at the depot, and what run on the ground went down the drains.

“We were breathing it in eight hours a day plus we were taking our clothes home and washing them in our machines … it was with us 24/7 really.”

He said workers raised concerns with management but they were laughed off.

“One of the bosses, he said: ‘No, there’s nothing wrong with that, you can drink it!’

“One said to us: ‘Oh well, if you don’t like it you haven’t got a job’.”

Mr Vince said he believed his kidney problems were linked to using the herbicide.

“What I’d like to have seen is medical bills paid,” he said.

“I go to the specialist every couple of months … if they covered medical expenses, that would be good.”

In a statement, TasNetworks said: “[We] recognises that some people involved in the screening process are suffering from other medical conditions not linked to historical TCDD exposure.

“These are still our people, valued employees past and present. We intend to keep in contact, and explore other options for supporting those people into the future.

“The options we’re considering include funded health checks every two years, a 1300 phone number to a dedicated support officer, and making pro-active contact about any fresh medical or scientific information on TCDD and associated illnesses.”

Former hydro workers in Tasmania to launch compensation claims over chemical exposure

May 17 2020

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-05-17/hydro-workers-claim-chemical-damages/11123070

At least 19 former hydro workers in Tasmania are seeking compensation, saying they were exposed to dangerous chemicals which has left them with chronic health conditions.

The workers were all employed by the Hydro Electric Commission (HEC), known today as TasNetworks.

The chemicals were sprayed by workers in groups of three or four to cut undergrowth and trees underneath transmission lines.

The spraying occurred primarily between the 1950s and the 1970s, but in some cases up until the 1990s.

The State Government has confirmed WorkSafe Tasmania was working with TasNetworks to examine the claims.

Geoff Pratt, who lives in Latrobe on Tasmania’s north-west coast, is one of the workers affected.

He suffers from severe asthma, which he believes is linked to chemical exposure during work at the Hydro in the 1960s, 70s and 80s.

“I was a young, fit healthy man, played footy, but my life has been shattered,” he said.

Dave Vince, another former worker who believes chemical exposure has led to his ill health, said his kidneys now work at 38 per cent.

“I remember just being covered in the chemical spray after working with the Hydro in the 1960s,” Mr Vince said.

“The worst part was you weren’t given any protective equipment and the chemicals would just flow down your back after spilling over the lip of the container.”

He and others want an apology.

“A lot of them have lost their husbands or partner a lot earlier than they probably should have done,” he said.

Graham Smith sprayed the chemicals from the start of the 1960s until 1974.

“It was hard, heavy work,” he said.

“We would work at least eight hours a day and would be just covered in the spray. It would make you feel dizzy.

“You would just be covered in the stuff, it would be flowing down your back.”

Mr Smith, Mr Vince and Mr Pratt are all taking TasNetworks to court over their exposure to the chemicals and have engaged a lawyer.

TasNetworks confirmed it was in discussions with 12 employees and seven former HEC workers about the chemical exposure.

But the Communications, Electrical and Plumbing Union (CEPU) of Australia said more than 40 former workers could be affected.

The union confirmed some of the former workers would be meeting TasNetworks toxicologist next week for tests.

1987-1998: King Lake (Victoria). Depletion of Dieldrin and DDT in soils

The depletion of dieldrin and DDT concentrations in Kinglake soils

H. J. Grainger, G. Roberts and L. Callinan

Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture 40(1) 53 – 56
Published: 2000

Abstract

Twenty-two sites on 14 former potato growing properties at Kinglake, Victoria, with similar soil type, topography and history of chemical use, were soil tested for organochlorine chemicals during 1987–88 and again during 1997–98. The 95% confidence limits for the decline in concentrations of dieldrin and DDT in the soil were 5.5–41.5% and 29.1–48.5%, respectively. There were no significant differences between farms in the rate of depletion of either organochlorine. Reductions in both to 1997–98 were not significantly associated with the concentration in 1987–88.

https://doi.org/10.1071/EA99034

1/5/20: Senate Inquiry Cancer Cluster Bellarine Peninsula. Pesticide: Dieldrin?

Senate inquiry investigates possible cancer cluster on Victoria’s Bellarine Peninsula

1 May 2020

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-05-01/senate-inquiry-into-possible-cancer-cluster-bellarine-peninsula/12202094

A Drysdale secondary school likely had “harmful levels” of insecticides in the soil when it first opened in 1997, a Senate inquiry into a possible cancer cluster on Victoria’s Bellarine Peninsula has heard.

Gordon Legal senior partner Peter Gordon told the inquiry he was acting for the spouses of three former Bellarine Secondary College students who died from cancer.

He said Scott Beyer, Mitch Trickey and Tyanne Riddle all attended the school during its initial years of operation and all three died as young adults from different forms of cancer.

Mr Gordon told the inquiry that dangerous levels of carcinogens would likely have been present when the school first opened.

“It’s very likely to have been unsafe in the years 1997, 1998, 1999 when school children were first put in harm’s way,” he said.

Concerns about possible soil contamination from dieldrin — a pesticide previously used on farms which can contaminate the soil for decades — prompted the Department of Education and WorkSafe to conduct soil tests at Bellarine Secondary College, in 2018.

The report found pesticides, including dieldrin, were found in the soil, but in levels below what is considered harmful to human health.

Mr Gordon told the inquiry that while soil testing conducted in recent years found “negligible levels” of dieldrin and other organo-chlorine pesticides, levels would have been higher in previous decades.

“Based on our investigation there’s evidence of a disturbing number of cancer cases occurring in the Bellarine Secondary College cohort — that is, teachers and students — who were present at the Drysdale campus when it first opened in 1997 and the years that followed,” he told the inquiry.

“There’s clear evidence that the school population in that period was exposed to certain levels of organo-chlorine pesticides, of which dieldrin was one.

“It’s probable that exposure caused the cancer and death of at least some people in the Bellarine Secondary College cohort.”

Mr Gordon also argued previous studies which found no evidence of a cancer cluster on the Bellarine Peninsula had “serious limitations” because they focused on statistical data across a wide geographical area.

Mr Gordon told the inquiry he planned to negotiate with the Victorian Government on behalf of his clients, but if those negotiations broke down he expected to launch legal proceedings.

But he made it clear he did not believe there was any ongoing risk to students at the school today.

“I don’t think there is a hard and fast year where one can say the risk became an acceptable risk,” he said.

“The risk and the exposure levels, in my view, diminished over the years.”

‘Unusual’ investigation arose from media reports

The Senate inquiry is the result of a promise from both major parties made during the tightly-fought 2019 federal election campaign in the marginal seat of Corangamite.

Both candidates picked up on community concerns about a perceived higher rate of cancer on the Bellarine Peninsula.

Victoria’s Chief Health Officer Brett Sutton told the inquiry that while the community was originally worried about the level of dieldrin in the soil at Bellarine Secondary College, concerns had changed over time to include a widespread mosquito-spraying program around Barwon Heads.

He said claims of a possible cancer cluster on the Bellarine Peninsula were “quite unusual” because the department had not been approached by individuals — as is usually the case with cancer cluster claims — but had instead responded to multiple community concerns raised in the media.

“We were trying to piece together where the concerns were focused,” he said.

“That did change over time. Over the past 16 months there’s been a shift in concerns or there’s been multiple concerns expressed by different groups.”

Senator labels report an ’embarrassment’

Victorian Senator Sarah Henderson, who promised the inquiry when she was recontesting the seat of Corangamite before taking up a role in the Senate, questioned the credibility of a Cancer Council study which found no higher incidence of cancer in Barwon Heads.

The study was commissioned by the state’s Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) and identified 315 new cancer cases diagnosed between 2001 and 2016, including six cases in people aged 10 to 34 years, in the town with a population of fewer than 4,000 people.

Senator Henderson said the Barwon Heads community’s biggest concern related to the mosquito-spraying program conducted by the local council, which ran from the 1980s to the mid-2000s.

“Most of the cancers that are of concern in the Barwon Heads community predominantly occurred prior to 2001 when this spraying program was underway,” Senator Henderson told the inquiry.

“This is such a poorly framed epidemiological study that it appears, and it’s almost designed to ensure, there’s no assessment at all of allegations of a potential cancer cluster in the period of the 1980 and 90s.”

The report’s author, Professor Roger Milne, told the inquiry DHHS had originally asked him to consider data from 1991 onwards.

But Professor Milne said there was a change in the way data was collated after 2001, making it more time-consuming and potentially problematic to compare cancer data before that date.

He told the inquiry he advised department that he could provide a more timely report if he only looked at data from 2001 onwards, a proposal the department accepted.

Senator Henderson said it was “extremely disappointing” the department had not taken into account many of the concerns raised by local residents.

“I would say that this is just an absolute embarrassment,” she told the inquiry.

Questions raised over ‘no cancer cluster’ findings

The inquiry also heard from Professor David Hill, a member of the expert advisory group which provides advice on potential cancer clusters to DHHS.

He said Professor Milne’s report was appropriate and “the conclusions are valid”.

Senator Henderson said it was shocking two decades of cancer data was not considered.

“Given that exposure [to chemicals used in mosquito spraying] first occurred from the early 1980s isn’t it the case that the Victorian Government has misled the community?” she asked.

“How can the community be assured there’s no cancer cluster?”

Professor Hill said the investigations were in line with the “standard response”.

I can’t agree with the proposition that the department have misled the community about the absence of a cancer cluster,” he said.

Professor Hill said one of the biggest issues was a lack of clarity around exactly what the community was concerned about

“Our group has never seen the age distribution of the cluster that people in the community perceived … so it’s very difficult to plan an analysis,” he said.

“It would be extremely helpful to know what the community’s evidence of a cluster is. And that evidence really needs to be based on the number of patients, the type of cancers they had, the date of diagnosis and their age.”

A local community group headed by Ross Harrison has been collating evidence of cancer and auto-immune disease diagnoses in Barwon Heads.

He told the inquiry the figures were alarming and there was a need for a more in-depth analysis.

Promise of further investigations

City of Greater Geelong planning, design and development director Gareth Smith told the inquiry all the products used in mosquito-spraying program were approved by the relevant Commonwealth Government agencies.

He said the council had provided all the information it had, including prior to council amalgamations in 1993, but many of the historic documents has not been preserved.

“We want to be transparent. We have an obligation to our community,” he said.

Under questioning, Professor Sutton told the inquiry he would agree to commission a report that considered data going back to the 1980s, provided there was a community desire for the information and it was “methodologically feasible”.

A second public hearing will be held once coronavirus restrictions are relaxed and the Senate committee is able to travel to the Bellarine Peninsula.

The Senate committee is due to hand down its report in November.

2017: Zhucheng Lukang Food Co Ltd (China). Breaching Australian MRL for Longan. Pesticides: Carbendazim, Thiamethoxam

Zhucheng Lukang Food Co Ltd (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim, Thiamethoxam

15/6/17: Dried Longan – Zhucheng Lukang Food Co Ltd (China): Carbendazim 0.2mg/kg

28/6/17: Dried Longan – Zhucheng Lukang Food Co Ltd (China): Thiamethoxam 0.04mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

20/1/17: Zhongshan Kun Bo Foodstuff Import and Export (China). Breached Australian MRL for Red Dates. Pesticide: Cyhalothrin

Zhongshan Kun Bo Foodstuff Import & Export Corp Ltd (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Cyhalothrin

20/1/17: Dried Red Dates – Zhongshan Kun Bo Foodstuff Import & Export Ltd (China): Cyhalothrin 0.02mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

3/6/19: Zhongshan Best Honest Trading. (China). Breaching Australian MRL’s for Red Dates. Pesticide: Propargite

Zhongshan Best Honest Trading Co Ltd (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Propargite

3/6/19: Dried Seedless Red Dates – Zhongshan Best Honest Trading Co Ltd (China): Propargite 0.07mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2017/19: Zhanhua Kingman Food (China). Breaching Australian MRL’s for Red Dates/Jujube. Pesticides: Multiple

Zhanhua Kingman Food Co. Ltd  (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim, Chlorothalonil, Difenconazole, Propiconazole, Tebuconazole, Dichlorvos

8/02/2018 Dried red jujube slices China Zhanhua Kingman Food Co.Ltd Carbendazim 0.061
8/02/2018 Dried red jujube slices China Zhanhua Kingman Food Co.Ltd Carbendazim 0.83
8/02/2018 Dried red jujube slices China Zhanhua Kingman Food Co.Ltd Chlorothalonil 0.092
8/02/2018 Dried red jujube slices China Zhanhua Kingman Food Co.Ltd Difenconazole 0.067
8/02/2018 Dried red jujube slices China Zhanhua Kingman Food Co.Ltd Propiconazole 0.15
8/02/2018 Dried red jujube slices China Zhanhua Kingman Food Co.Ltd Tebuconazole 0.17
8/02/2018 Dried red jujube slices China Zhanhua Kingman Food Co.Ltd Tebuconazole 0.36
1/12/2017 Seedless red dates China Zhanhua Kingman Food Co.Ltd Carbendazim 0.47
1/12/2017 Seedless red dates China Zhanhua Kingman Food Co.Ltd Difenoconazole 0.14
1/12/2017 Seedless red dates China Zhanhua Kingman Food Co.Ltd Tebuconazole 0.32
23/10/2019 Red dates China Zhanhua Kingman Food Ltd Dichlorovos 0.06
23/10/2019 Red dates China Zhanhua Kingman Food Ltd Difenconazole 0.28

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2017/19: Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd (China). Breaching Australian MRLs for Lychees. Pesticides: Multiple

Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Azoxystrobin, Chlorpyrifos, Cypermethrin, Difenconazole, Dimethomorph, Indoxacarb, Cyhalothrin, Thiabendazole, Carbendazim, Iprodione

19/06/2017 Princess green Lychee China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Chlorpyrifos 1
19/06/2017 Princess green Lychee China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Cypermethrin 0.4
19/06/2017 Princess green Lychee China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Difenoconazole 0.2
19/06/2017 Princess green Lychee China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Iprodione 10
19/06/2017 Princess green Lychee China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Thiabendazole 0.03
11/06/2019 Fresh lychee China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Azoxystrobin 0.55
11/06/2019 Fresh lychee China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Chlorpyrifos 0.33
11/06/2019 Fresh lychee China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Cypermethrin 0.43
11/06/2019 Fresh lychee China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Difenoconazole 0.84
11/06/2019 Fresh lychee China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Difenoconazole 0.73
11/06/2019 Fresh lychee China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Dimethomorph 0.73
11/06/2019 Fresh lychee China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Dimethomorph 0.096
11/06/2019 Fresh lychee China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Indoxacarb 0.068
11/06/2019 Fresh lychee China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Indoxacarb 0.12
8/07/2019 Fresh lychees China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Azoxystrobin 0.16
8/07/2019 Fresh lychees China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Azoxystrobin 0.22
8/07/2019 Fresh lychees China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Cyhalothrin 0.06
8/07/2019 Fresh lychees China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Cyhalothrin 0.07
8/07/2019 Fresh lychees China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Difenconazole 0.088
8/07/2019 Fresh lychees China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Difenconazole 0.095
8/07/2019 Fresh lychees China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Thiabendazole 2.2
8/07/2019 Fresh lychees China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Thiabendazole 1.9
13/08/2019 Fresh lychees China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Carbendazim 1.8
13/08/2019 Fresh lychees China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Chlorpyrifos 0.09
13/08/2019 Fresh lychees China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Cypermethrin 0.39
13/08/2019 Fresh lychees China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Dimethomorph 0.43
13/08/2019 Fresh lychees China Zhangzhou Xinmingxing Trading Co Ltd Thiabendazole 0.04

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

20/7/18: Zhangzhou Dexing Development Co Ltd (China). Breached Australian MRL for Lychees. Pesticide: Thiabendazole

Zhangzhou Dexing Development Co Ltd (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Thiabendazole

20/7/18: Fresh Lychees – Zhangzhou Dexing Development Co Ltd (China): Thiabendazole 0.032mg/kg & 0.18mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

5/9/19: Yongxiang Food Processing Plant (China). Breaching Australian MRL for Dried Haw. Pesticides: Carbendazim, Cyhalothrin

Yongxiang Food Processing Plant (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim, Cyhalothrin

5/9/19: Dried Haw – Yongxiang Food Processing Plant (China): Carbendazim 0.2mg/kg

5/9/19: Dried Haw – Yongxiang Food Processing Plant (China): Cyhalothrin 0.12mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

11/4/19: Yicheng Dashanhe Modern Agriculture (China). Breached Australian MRL for Red Dates. Pesticide: Tebuconazole

Yicheng Dashanhe Modern Agriculture Co Ltd (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Tebuconazole

11/4/19: Dried Red Dates – Yicheng Dashanhe Modern Agriculture Co Ltd(China): Tebuconazole 0.17mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

 

2018/19: Xinzheng Xinxing Dates Co Ltd (China). Breaching MRL’s for Red Dates. Pesticides: Difenconazole, Thiamethoxam

Xinzheng Xinxing Dates Co Ltd  (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Difenconazole, Thiamethoxam

17/10/18: Dried Red Dates – Xinzheng Xinxing Dates Co Ltd (China): Difenconazole 0.06mg/kg

28/2/19: Dried Red Dates – Xinzheng Xinxing Dates Co Ltd (China): (China): Thiamethoxam 0.05mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

8/2/19: Xin Zheng City Xin Xing Jujube Co Ltd (China). Breaches to Australian MRL for Red Dates. Pesticides: Cypermethrin, Difenconazole, Tebuconazole

Xin Zheng City Xin Xing Jujube Co Ltd  (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Cypermethrin, Difenconazole, Tebuconazole

8/2/19: Instant Red Date Slice – Xin Zheng City Xin Xing Jujube Co Ltd (China): Cypermethrin 0.13mg/kg

8/2/19: Instant Red Date Slice – Xin Zheng City Xin Xing Jujube Co Ltd (China): Difenconazole 0.12mg/kg

8/2/19: Instant Red Date Slice – Xin Zheng City Xin Xing Jujube Co Ltd (China): Tebuconazole 0.06mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

4/10/19: Xiangyang Heli Agriculture Development Co Ltd (China). Breached Australian MRL for Snap Peas. Pesticide: Thiamethoxam

Xiangyang Heli Agriculture Development Co Ltd  (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Thiamethoxam

4/10/19: Fresh Sugar Snap Peas – Xiangyang Heli Agriculture Development Co Ltd  (China): Thiamethoxam 0.1mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

1/5/19: Wan Chen Science and Technology Agriculture (Taiwan). Breached Australian MRL for Mushrooms. Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos

Wan Chen Science and Technology Agriculture Co Ltd (Taiwan) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Chlorpyrifos

1/5/19: Shitake Mushrooms – Wan Chen Science and Technology Agriculture Co Ltd (Taiwan): Chlorpyrifos 0.022mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2018/19: Vadilal Industries Limited (India). Breaches to Australian MRLs for Fenugreek leaves, Spinach Leaves, Hyacinth Bean, Chilli, Gourd. Pesticides: Multiple

Vadilal Industries Limited (India) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Profenofos, Chlorpyrifos, Acephate, Tebuconazole, Dimethoate

9/03/2018 Fenugreek leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Profenofos 0.22mg/kg
10/05/2018 Fenugreek leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Chlorpyrifos 0.016mg/kg
10/05/2018 Fenugreek leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Profenofos 0.145mg/kg
11/05/2018 Fenugreek leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Profenofos 0.29mg/kg
26/07/2018 Spinach Leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Acephate 0.083mg/kg
27/07/2018 Hyacinth Bean India Vadilal Industries Limited Profenofos 0.176mg/kg
5/11/2018 Frozen fenugreek leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Chlorpyrifos 0.032mg/kg
3/12/2018 Spinach Leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Chlorpyrifos 0.02mg/kg
11/12/2018 Spinach Leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Profenofos 0.36mg/kg
24/12/2018 Frozen spinach leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Chlorpyrifos 0.085mg/kg
24/12/2018 Frozen spinach leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Profenofos 0.12mg/kg
28/12/2018 Spinach Leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Chlorpyrifos 0.04mg/kg
28/12/2018 Spinach Leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Chlorpyrifos 0.024mg/kg
22/01/2019 Spinach Leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Acephate 0.13mg/kg
30/01/2019 Spinach Leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Acephate 0.08mg/kg
30/01/2019 Spinach Leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Chlorpyrifos 0.02mg/kg
30/01/2019 Spinach Leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Chlorpyrifos 0.024mg/kg
6/02/2019 Spinach Leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Chlorpyrifos 0.03mg/kg
8/05/2019 Green chilli India Vadilal Industries Limited Tebuconazole 0.059mg/kg
19/06/2019 Fresh chilli India Vadilal Industries Limited Tebuconazole 0.07mg/kg
28/06/2019 Cut hyacinth beans India Vadilal Industries Limited Profenofos 0.09mg/kg
19/08/2019 Spinach Leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Chlorpyrifos 0.23mg/kg
6/09/2019 Spinach Leaves India Vadilal Industries Limited Chlorpyrifos 0.09mg/kg
27/11/2019 Vegetable Ivy Gourd India Vadilal Industries Limited Dimethoate 0.027mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

28/3/17: Titan Industrial (Changshu) Foods Co Ltd  (China). Breached Australian MRL for Cauliflower. Pesticide: Procymidone

Titan Industrial (Changshu) Foods Co Ltd  (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Procymidone

28/3/17: Cauliflower – Titan Industrial (Changshu) Foods Co Ltd  (China): Procymidone 0.15mg/kg & Procymidone 0.22mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

5/3/19: Tianjin Jinghai Huixin Industry and Trade (China). Breaching Australian MRL for Red Dates. Pesticides: Multiple

Tianjin Jinghai Huixin Industry and Trade Co Ltd (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim, Cyhalothrin, Propiconazole, Pyrimethanil, Thiabendazole, Triadimefon, Triadimenol

5/03/2019 Dried red dates China Tianjin Jinghai Huixin Industry And Trade Co Ltd Carbendazim 0.78mg/kg
5/03/2019 Dried red dates China Tianjin Jinghai Huixin Industry And Trade Co Ltd Cyhalothrin 0.011mg/kg
5/03/2019 Dried red dates China Tianjin Jinghai Huixin Industry And Trade Co Ltd Propiconazole 0.37mg/kg
5/03/2019 Dried red dates China Tianjin Jinghai Huixin Industry And Trade Co Ltd Pyrimethanil 0.12mg/kg
5/03/2019 Dried red dates China Tianjin Jinghai Huixin Industry And Trade Co Ltd Thiabendazole 1mg/kg
5/03/2019 Dried red dates China Tianjin Jinghai Huixin Industry And Trade Co Ltd Triadimefon 0.2mg/kg
5/03/2019 Dried red dates China Tianjin Jinghai Huixin Industry And Trade Co Ltd Triadimenol 0.08mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

3/12/19: The Fruit Republic Can Tho One Member (Vietnam). Breaching Australian MRL for Dragon Fruit. Pesticide: Carbendazim

The Fruit Republic Can Tho One Member Co Ltd (Vietnam) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim

3/12/19: Dragon Fruit – The Fruit Republic Can Tho One Member Co Ltd (Vietnam): Carbendazim 0.19mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

31/3/17: Thai World Import and Export Co (Thailand). Breach to Australian MRL for Longan. Pesticide: Carbendazim

Thai World Import and Export Co (Thailand) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim

31/3/17: Dried Seedless Longan – Thai World Import and Export Co (Thailand): Carbendazim 0.08mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2019: Thai Thuan Binh Co Ltd (Vietnam). Breaching Australian MRL’s for Chillies. Pesticides: Chlorpyrifos, Difenconazole, Propiconazole, Tebuconazole, Metalaxyl

2019: Thai Thuan Binh Co Ltd (Vietnam) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Chlorpyrifos, Difenconazole, Propiconazole, Tebuconazole, Metalaxyl

13/06/2019 Green chilli Vietnam Thai Thuan Binh Co.Ltd Chlorpyrifos 0.2mg/kg
13/06/2019 Green chilli Vietnam Thai Thuan Binh Co.Ltd Difenconazole 0.23mg/kg
13/06/2019 Green chilli Vietnam Thai Thuan Binh Co.Ltd Propiconazole 0.16mg/kg
13/06/2019 Green chilli Vietnam Thai Thuan Binh Co.Ltd Tebuconazole 0.095mg/kg
13/06/2019 Red chilli Vietnam Thai Thuan Binh Co.Ltd Chlorpyrifos 0.1mg/kg
13/06/2019 Red chilli Vietnam Thai Thuan Binh Co.Ltd Difenconazole 0.22mg/kg
13/06/2019 Red chilli Vietnam Thai Thuan Binh Co.Ltd Metalaxyl 0.14mg/kg
13/06/2019 Red chilli Vietnam Thai Thuan Binh Co.Ltd Propiconazole 0.17mg/kg
13/06/2019 Red chilli Vietnam Thai Thuan Binh Co.Ltd Tebuconazole 0.15mg/kg

 

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2018/19: Tanaya International Co Ltd (Thailand). Breaching Australian MRL for Longan. Pesticide: Carbendazim

Tanaya International Co Ltd (Thailand) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim

19/12/18: Frozen Dried Longan – Tanaya International Co Ltd (Thailand): Carbendazim 0.06mg/kg

4/6/19: Frozen Dried Longan – Tanaya International Co Ltd (Thailand): Carbendazim 0.053mg/kg

29/7/19: Frozen Dried Longan – Tanaya International Co Ltd (Thailand): Carbendazim 0.073mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2018/19: Tan Dong Trade Production Co Ltd (Vietnam). Breaches to MRL for Chillies. Pesticides: Multiple

Tan Dong Trade Production Company Limited  (Vietnam) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Chlorpyrifos, Difenconazole, Permethrin, Carbendazim, Cyhalothrin, Metalaxyl, Profenofos, Propiconazole

20/2/18: Frozen Red Chilli  – Tan Dong Trade Production Company Limited  (Vietnam): Carbendazim 0.64mg/kg

20/2/18: Frozen Red Chilli  – Tan Dong Trade Production Company Limited  (Vietnam): Chlorpyrifos 0.04mg/kg

20/2/18: Frozen Red Chilli  – Tan Dong Trade Production Company Limited  (Vietnam): Cyhalothrin 0.01mg/kg

20/2/18: Frozen Red Chilli  – Tan Dong Trade Production Company Limited  (Vietnam): Diefnconazole 0.2mg/kg

20/2/18: Frozen Red Chilli  – Tan Dong Trade Production Company Limited  (Vietnam): Metalaxyl 0.11mg/kg

20/2/18: Frozen Red Chilli  – Tan Dong Trade Production Company Limited  (Vietnam): Profenofos 0.33mg/kg

20/2/18: Frozen Red Chilli  – Tan Dong Trade Production Company Limited  (Vietnam): Propiconazole 0.16mg/kg

24/12/19: Frozen Red Chillies without tails – Tan Dong Trade Production Company Limited  (Vietnam): Chlorpyrifos 0.091mg/kg

24/12/19: Frozen Red Chillies without tails – Tan Dong Trade Production Company Limited  (Vietnam): Difenconazole 0.16mg/kg

24/12/19: Frozen Red Chillies without tails – Tan Dong Trade Production Company Limited  (Vietnam): Permethrin 0.11mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

21/11/18: Synergy Lanka Trading Company (Sri Lanka). Breaching Australian MRL on Gourd. Pesticide: Carbendazim

Synergy Lanka Trading Company A.I (Sri Lanka) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim

21/11/18: Dehydrated Bitter Gourd – Synergy Lanka Trading Company (Sri Lanka): Carbendazim 0.91mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2019: Sunshine International (Thailand). Breaching Australian MRL for Durian. Pesticide: Procymidone

Sunshine International Co Ltd (Thailand) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Procymidone

13/11/19: Frozen Durian – Sunshine International Co Ltd (Thailand): Procymidone 0.99mg/kg

5/12/19: Durian Monthong – Sunshine International Co Ltd (Thailand): Procymidone 0.18mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2017/19: Shouguang Tiancheng Hongli Food (China). Breaching MRL’s for Strawberries. Pesticide: Procymidone

Shouguang Tiancheng Hongli Food Co Ltd (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Procymidone

26/4/17: Frozen Strawberry Pulp – Shouguang Tiancheng Hongli Food Co Ltd (China): Procymidone 0.1mg/kg

3/5/17: Frozen Strawberry Puree – Shouguang Tiancheng Hongli Food Co Ltd (China): Procymidone 0.07mg/kg

11/1/19: Diced Strawberries – Shouguang Tiancheng Hongli Food Co Ltd (China): Procymidone 0.03mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2017: Shantou Lifa Trading Co Ltd (China). Breached Australian MRL for Dried Dates, Seedless Red Dates

Shantou Lifa Trading Co Ltd (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Propargite, Azoxystrobin, Carbendazim, Difenconazole, Propiconazole, Tebuconazole

18/4/17: Dried Dates – Shantou Lifa Trading Co Ltd (China): Azoxystrobin 0.13mg/kg

18/4/17: Dried Dates – Shantou Lifa Trading Co Ltd (China): Carbendazim 0.49mg/kg

18/4/17: Dried Dates – Shantou Lifa Trading Co Ltd (China): Difenconazole 0.2mg/kg

18/4/17: Dried Dates – Shantou Lifa Trading Co Ltd (China): Propiconazole 0.069mg/kg

18/4/17: Dried Dates – Shantou Lifa Trading Co Ltd (China): Tebuconazole 0.37mg/kg

26/5/17: Seedless Red Dates – Shantou Lifa Trading Co Ltd (China): Propargite 0.12mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2/7/18: Shanghai Xushun Foodstuff Co Ltd (China). Breach of Australian MRL for Mushrooms. Pesticide: Paclobutrazol

Shanghai Xushun Foodstuff Co Ltd (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Paclobutrazol

2/7/18: Frozen Water Mushrooms – Shanghai Xushun Foodstuff Co Ltd (China): Paclobutrazol 0.078mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

4/2/19: Shanghai Sunqiao Minshen Mushroom Co Ltd (China). Breached Australian MRL for Snap Peas. Pesticide: Difenconazole

Shanghai Sunqiao Minshen Mushroom Co Ltd (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Difenconazole

4/2/19: Fresh Sugar Snap Peas – Shanghai Sunqiao Minshen Mushroom Co Ltd (China): Difenconazole 0.05mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2017/18: Shanghai Jx International Trading (China). Breaching Australian MRL for Spinach. Pesticides: Cyhalothrin, Carbendazim

Shanghai Jx International Trading Co Ltd (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Cyhalothrin, Carbendazim

8/5/17: Frozen Chinese Spinach – Shanghai Jx International Trading Co Ltd (China): Cyhalothrin 0.01mg/kg

8/5/17: Frozen Chinese Spinach – Shanghai Jx International Trading Co Ltd (China): Cyhalothrin 0.02mg/kg

5/11/18: Frozen Spinach – Shanghai Jx International Trading Co Ltd (China): Carbendazim 0.072mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2017/19: Shandong Sinofarm Food Co Ltd (China). Breached Australian MRL’s on Fresh Garlic Shoots. Pesticides: Carbendazim, Thiabendazole

Shandong Sinofarm Food Co Ltd (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Thiabendazole, Carbendazim

30/1/17: Fresh Garlic Shoots – Shandong Sinofarm Food Co Ltd (China): Carbendazim 0.12mg/kg

25/10/19: Fresh Garlic Shoots – Shandong Sinofarm Food Co Ltd (China): Thiabendazole 0.34mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

31/10/17: Shandong Jinsi Food Co Ltd (China). Breached Australian MRL’s on Seedless Red Dates. Pesticides: Carbendazim, Difenconazole, Tebuconazole

Shandong Jinsi Food Co Ltd (China) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim, Difenconazole, Tebuconazole,

31/10/17: Seedless Red Dates – Shandong Jinsi Food Co Ltd (China): Carbendazim 0.43mg/kg, Difenconazole 0.35mg/kg, Tebuconazole 0.5mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

23/3/18: Sethachon Co Ltd (Thailand). Breaching Australian MRL’s on Rosella Leaves. Pesticides: Chlorpyrifos, Dimethoate

Sethachon Co Ltd (Thailand) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Chlorpyrifos, Dimeothate

23/3/18: Rosella Leaves – Sethachon Co Ltd (Thailand): Chlorpyrifos 0.083mg/kg

23/3/18: Rosella Leaves – Sethachon Co Ltd (Thailand): Dimethoate 1.5mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2017/19: Saka Saka Company Limited (Vietnam). Breached Australian MRL’s for chilli, purple corn. Pesticides: Chlorpyrifos, Difenconazole, Permethrin

Saka Saka Company Limited (Vietnam) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Chlorpyrifos, Difenconazole, Permethrin

27/9/17: Frozen Tiny Red Chilli – Saka Saka Company Limited (Vietnam): Difenconazole 0.16mg/kg

27/9/17: Frozen Tiny Red Chilli – Saka Saka Company Limited (Vietnam): Permethrin 0.11mg/kg

31/10/19: Frozen Purple Corn – Saka Saka Company Limited (Vietnam): Chlorpyrifos 0.12mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

30/8/18: Royal Jubilee Ginseng Farm Inc (Canada). Breached Australian MRL’s on Ginseng Fibre: Pesticides: DDT, Fludioxonil

Royal Jubilee Ginseng Farm Inc (Canada) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: DDT, Fludioxonil

30/8/18: Ginseng Fibre – Royal Jubilee Ginseng Farm Inc (Canada): DDT 1mg/kg

30/8/18: Ginseng Fibre – Royal Jubilee Ginseng Farm Inc (Canada): Fludioxonil 0.41mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2018: Reddy’s Export (Fiji). Breaching Australian MRL’s for Bael and Rosella Leaves. Pesticides: Deltamethrin, Acephate, Methamidophos

Reddy’s Export (Fiji) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Deltamethrin, Acephate, Methamidophos

21/9/18: Bael Leaves – Reddy’s Export (Fiji): Deltamethrin 0.72mg/kg

21/9/18: Bael Leaves – Reddy’s Export (Fiji): Deltamethrin 0.39mg/kg

21/9/18: Rosella Leaves – Reddy’s Export (Fiji): Acephate 7.8mg/kg

21/9/18: Rosella Leaves – Reddy’s Export (Fiji): Methamidophos 0.82mg/kg

26/11/18: Rosella Leaves – Reddy’s Export (Fiji): Deltamethrin 0.14mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2017/18: Rabeena Food (Sri Lanka). Breaching Australian MRL’s Tamarind, Goraka Fruit, Brindleberry. Pesticide: 2-Phenylphenol

Rabeena Food (Pvt) Ltd (Sri Lanka) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: 2-Phenylphenol

27/6/17: Tamarind – Rabeena Food (Pvt) Ltd (Sri Lanka): 2-Phenylphenol 0.18mg/kg

30/1/18: Dried Goraka Fruit – Rabeena Food (Pvt) Ltd (Sri Lanka): 2-Phenylphenol 0.18mg/kg

28/2/18: Brindleberry Fruit – Rabeena Food (Pvt) Ltd (Sri Lanka): 2-Phenylphenol 0.13mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2017/19: O-Cha Food Pack Co Ltd (Thailand). Multiple Australian pesticide breaches on Red Chilli, Dried Longan, Pandan Leaves. Pesticides: Multiple

O-Cha Food Pack Co Ltd (Thailand) –  Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim, Difenconazole, Chlorpyrifos, Myclobutanil, Propiconazole, Carbaryl, Profenofos

8/6/17: Red Chilli Whole Without Stem – O-Cha Food Pack Co Ltd (Thailand) – Difenconazole 0.25mg/kg

8/6/17: Red Chilli Whole Without Stem – O-Cha Food Pack Co Ltd (Thailand) – Profenofos 0.094mg/kg

22/12/17: Dried Longan Seedless – O-Cha Food Pack Co Ltd (Thailand) – Carbendazim 0.077mg/kg

22/12/17: Red Chilli – O-Cha Food Pack Co Ltd (Thailand) – Difenconazole 0.088mg/kg

22/12/17: Red Chilli – O-Cha Food Pack Co Ltd (Thailand) – Myclobutanil 0.061mg/kg

22/12/17: Red Chilli – O-Cha Food Pack Co Ltd (Thailand) – Propicinazole 0.082mg/kg

29/1/18: Pandan Leaves – O-Cha Food Pack Co Ltd (Thailand) – Chlorpyrifos 0.043mg/kg

29/1/18: Pandan Leaves – O-Cha Food Pack Co Ltd (Thailand) – Difenconazole 0.078mg/kg

29/1/18: Pandan Leaves – O-Cha Food Pack Co Ltd (Thailand) – Difenconazole 0.39mg/kg

12/2/18: Red Chilli – O-Cha Food Pack Co Ltd (Thailand) – Carbaryl 0.068mg/kg

1/2/19: Red Chilli – O-Cha Food Pack Co Ltd (Thailand) – Difenconazole 0.26mg/kg

1/2/19: Red Chilli – O-Cha Food Pack Co Ltd (Thailand) – Propiconazole 0.26mg/kg

10/10/19: Frozen Pandan Leaf – O-Cha Food Pack Co Ltd (Thailand) – Difenconazole 0.054mg/kg

5/12/19: Dried Longan Seedless – O-Cha Food Pack Co Ltd (Thailand) – Carbendazim 0.06mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2017/19: New Lamthong Food Industries (Thailand). Breaches to Australian MRLs. Pesticides: Carbendazim, Cypermethrin, Metalaxyl

New Lamthong Food Industries Co Ltd (Thailand) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim, Cypermethrin, Metalaxyl

18/7/17: Dried Longan – New Lamthong Food Industries Co Ltd (Thailand) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 0.096mg/kg

5/3/19: Rosella Leaves – New Lamthong Food Industries Co Ltd (Thailand) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 1.2mg/kg

5/3/19: Rosella Leaves – New Lamthong Food Industries Co Ltd (Thailand) – Pesticide: Cypermethrin 0.8mg/kg

5/3/19: Rosella Leaves – New Lamthong Food Industries Co Ltd (Thailand) – Pesticide: Metalaxyl 0.2mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2017/18: Nam Hai Company (Vietnam). Breaching Australian MRL chilli. Pesticides: Profenofos, Difenconazole

Nam Hai Company (Vietnam) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Difenconazole, Profenofos

28/2/17: Frozen small red chilli – Nam Hai Company (Vietnam) – Pesticide: Profenofos 0.14mg/kg

16/5/17: Frozen small red chilli – Nam Hai Company (Vietnam) – Pesticide: Difenconazole 0.077mg/kg

16/5/17: Frozen small red chilli – Nam Hai Company (Vietnam) – Pesticide: Difenconazole 0.1mg/kg

7/6/17: Frozen small red chilli without stem – Nam Hai Company (Vietnam) – Pesticide: Difenconazole 0.098mg/kg

7/6/17: Frozen small red chilli without stem – Nam Hai Company (Vietnam) – Pesticide: Profenofos 0.34mg/kg

17/5/18: Frozen small red chilli – Nam Hai Company (Vietnam) – Pesticide: Difenconazole 0.06mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2017: Nagy Foods (Egypt). Breaches to Australian MRL’s citrus. Pesticide: Cyhalothrin

Nagy Foods (Egypt) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Cyhalothrin

27/1/17: Fresh Lemons – Nagy Foods (Egypt) – Pesticide: Cyhalothrin 0.04mg/kg

6/4/17: Oranges – Nagy Foods (Egypt) – Pesticide: Cyhalothrin 0.02mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

23/10/17: Mt Company Ltd (Vietnam). Breached Australian MRL red chilli. Pesticides: Chlorpyrifos, Difenconazole, Propiconazole

Mt Company Ltd (Vietnam) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Chlorpyrifos, Difenconazole, Propiconazole

23/10/17: Frozen red chilli – Mt Company Ltd (Vietnam) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.01mg/kg

23/10/17: Frozen red chilli – Mt Company Ltd (Vietnam) – Pesticide: Difenconazole 0.34mg/kg

23/10/17: Frozen red chilli – Mt Company Ltd (Vietnam) – Pesticide: Propiconazole 0.58mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2018: Minh Anh International (Vietnam). Breached Australian MRL for Chilli. Pesticides: Chlorpyrifos, Difenconazole, Acephate

Minh Anh International Co Ltd (Vietnam) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Chlorpyrifos, Difenconazole, Acephate,

26/4/18: Frozen small mixed chilli – Minh Anh International Co Ltd (Vietnam) – Pesticide: Acephate 0.11mg/kg

26/4/18: Frozen small mixed chilli – Minh Anh International Co Ltd (Vietnam) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.047mg/kg

26/4/18: Frozen small mixed chilli – Minh Anh International Co Ltd (Vietnam) – Pesticide: Difenconazole 0.076mg/kg

4/6/18: Frozen red chilli – Minh Anh International Co Ltd (Vietnam) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.015mg/kg

4/6/18: Frozen red chilli – Minh Anh International Co Ltd (Vietnam) – Pesticide: Difenconazole 0.083mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2019: Manafez International (Saudi Arabia). Breaching Australian MRL on dates. Pesticides: Cypermethrin, Carbendazim, Cyhalothrin

Manafez International (Saudi Arabia) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim, Cypermethrin, Cyhalothrin

3/5/19: Premium Dates – Manafez International (Saudi Arabia) – Pesticide: Cypermethrin 0.17mg/kg

12/11/19: Fresh Dates – Manafez International (Saudi Arabia) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 0.06mg/kg

12/11/19: Sukkary Fresh Dates – Manafez International (Saudi Arabia) – Pesticide: Cyhalothrin 0.03mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

7/9/18: Liang Pin Pu Zi Industry Food Co Ltd (China), Breaches to Australian MRL’s on Instant Dates. Pesticides Multiple

Liang Pin Pu Zi Industry Food Co Ltd (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim, Cyhalothrin, Cypermethrin, Difenconazole, Pyraclostrobin, Tebuconazole

7/9/18: Instant Dates – Liang Pin Pu Zi Industry Food Co Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 0.34mg/kg, Cyhalothrin 0.05mg/kg, Cypermethrin 0.25mg/kg, Difenconazole 0.18mg/kg, Pyraclostrobin 0.16mg/kg, Tebuconazole 0.19mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

26/7/18: Laiyang Shenzhouyiwei Foodstuff Co Ltd (China). Breach Australian MRL’s. Pesticide: Procymidone

Laiyang Shenzhouyiwei Foodstuff Co Ltd  (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Procymidone

26/7/18: Strawberries –Laiyang Shenzhouyiwei Foodstuff Co Ltd  (China) – Pesticide: Procymidone 0.005mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2017: Laiwu Taifeng Foods Co Ltd (China). Breaching Australian MRL’s. Pesticides: Cyhalothrin, Thiamethoxam

Laiwu Taifeng Foods Co Ltd (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Cyholathrin, Thiamethoxam

9/3/17: Asian Pear – Laiwu Taifeng Foods Co Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Cyhalothrin 0.021mg/kg

1/9/17: Peeled Onions – Laiwu Taifeng Foods Co Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Thiamethoxam 0.031mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

25/6/19: Labasa Farm Fresh (Fiji). Breached Australian MRL’s. Pesticides: Acephate, Methamidophos

Labasa Farm Fresh (Fiji) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Acephate, Methamidophos

25/6/19: Frozen Cowpeas – Labasa Farm Fresh (Fiji) – Pesticide: Acephate 0.31mg/kg

25/6/19: Frozen Cowpeas – Labasa Farm Fresh (Fiji) – Pesticide: Methamidophos 0.098mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2017/18: Kohinoor Foods Ltd (India). Breaching Australian MRL/Basmati Rice. Pesticide: Buprofezin

Kohinoor Foods Ltd (India) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Buprofezin

23/3/17: Basmati Rice – Kohinoor Foods Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Buprofezin 0.066mg/kg

1/2/18: Basmati Rice –  Kohinoor Foods Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Buprofezin 0.024mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

2019: Kkr Agro Mills (India). Breaching Australian MRL Tamarind. Pesticide: 2-Phenylphenol

Kkr Agro Mills (P) Ltd (India) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: 2-Phenylphenol

6/2/19: Tamarind –  Kkr Agro Mills (P) Ltd (India) – Pesticide: 2-Phenylphenol 0.14mg/kg

26/8/19: Cambodge Dried Tamarind –  Kkr Agro Mills (P) Ltd (India) – Pesticide: 2-Phenylphenol 0.25mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

20/2/18: Kaelen Phils Inc (Philippines). Breaching Australian MRL. Pesticides: Profenofos, Chlorpyrifos

Kaelen Phils Inc (Philippines) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Profenofos, Chlorpyrifos

20/2/18: Jute Leaves –  Kaelen Phils Inc (Philippines) – Pesticide: Profenofos 0.96mg/kg

20/2/18: Jute Leaves –  Kaelen Phils Inc (Philippines) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.089mg/kg

20/2/18: Jute Leaves –  Kaelen Phils Inc (Philippines) – Pesticide: Profenofos 0.28mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

10/5/18: Jinxiang Hongyu Freezing and Storage Ltd (China). Breach to Australian MRL for Garlic Shoots. Pesticide: Iprodione

Jinxiang Hongyu Freezing and Storage Ltd (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Iprodione

10/5/18: Garlic Shoots –  Jinxiang Hongyu Freezing and Storage Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Iprodione 0.85mg/kg

Source: AQIS Failing Food Surveys. Department of Agriculture Australia

22/1/19: Jining Pengkie Trading Co Ltd (China). Breach Australian MRL’s for Sugar Snap Peas. Pesticides: Carbendazim, Propiconazole, Thiamethoxam

Jining Pengjie Trading Co Ltd (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim, Propiconazole, Thiamethoxam

22/1/19: Fresh Sugar Snap Peas – JIangmen Junying Food Co., Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 0.14mg/kg

22/1/19: Fresh Sugar Snap Peas – JIangmen Junying Food Co., Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Propiconazole 0.085mg/kg

22/1/19: Fresh Sugar Snap Peas – JIangmen Junying Food Co., Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Thiamethoxam 0.035mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

10/3/17: JIang Hua Yao Automonous County Hongu Park Huafa Agricultural Products (China). Breached Australian MRL for Sugar Snap Peas. Pesticide: Carbendazim

JIang Hua Yao Automonous County Hongu Park Huafa Agricultural Products (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim

10/3/17: Fresh Sugar Snap Peas – JIang Hua Yao Automonous County Hongu Park Huafa Agricultural Products (China) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 0.07mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

17/10/19: Jasmine Vineyards Incorporated (United States). Breaches Australian MRL for Grapes. Pesticide: Propargite

Jasmine Vineyards Incorporated (United States) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Propargite

17/10/19: Fresh Grapes – Jasmine Vineyards Inorporated (United States) – Pesticide: Propargite 2.7mg/kg

17/10/19: Fresh Grapes – Jasmine Vineyards Inorporated (United States) – Pesticide: Propargite 1.4mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

23/12/19: Iprona Ag-Spa (Italy) Breached Australian MRL’s for Elderberry Concentrate. Pesticide: Fludioxonil, Tebuconazole

Iprona Ag-Spa (Italy) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Fludioxonil, Tebuconazole

23/12/19: Elderberry Concentrate – Iprona Ag-Spa (Italy) – Pesticide: Fludioxonil 0.024mg/kg

23/12/19: Elderberry Concentrate – Iprona Ag-Spa (Italy) – Pesticide: Tebuconazole 0.12mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2018/19: Innovative Cuisine (India). Multiple Australian pesticide MRL breaches on Guar Beans, Fenugreek Leaves, Green Chillies, Indian Flat Beans, Spinach, Gourd, Surti Beans

Innovative Cuisine (India) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Azinphos-Methyl, Chlorpyrifos, Fenvalerate, Monocrotophos, Hexaconazole, Cyhalothrin, Propiconazole, Tebuconazole, Phosmet, Cypermethrin, Carbendazim, Profenofos, Dimethoate

20/4/18: Cut Guar Beans – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Azinphos Methyl 0.095mg/kg & 0.08mg/kg

20/4/18: Fenugreek leaves – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.173mg/kg & 0.08mg/kg

20/4/18: Hot Green Chllies – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Phosmet 0.191mg/kg

29/8/18: Green Chllies – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Hexaconazole 0.058mg/kg

5/10/18: Green Chllies – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Cyhalothrin 0.175mg/kg

5/10/18: Green Chllies – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Propiconazole 0.352mg/kg

19/12/18: Green Chllies – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Tebuconazole 0.15mg/kg

1/3/19: Indian Flat Beans – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Cyhalothrin 0.11mg/kg

1/3/19: Indian Flat Beans – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Fenvalerate 0.53mg/kg

1/3/19: Indian Flat Beans – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Cyhalothrin 0.26mg/kg

1/3/19: Indian Flat Beans – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Cyhalothrin 0.26mg/kg

10/4/19: Frozen Spinach – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.28mg/kg

16/4/19: Indian Flat Beans – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Cypermethrin 0.14mg/kg

16/4/19: Indian Flat Beans – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Fenvalerate 0.58mg/kg

23/5/19: Indian Flat Beans – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Cypermethrin 0.08mg/kg

12/6/19: Indian Flat Beans – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 0.05mg/kg

2/7/19: Indian Flat Beans – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Cypermethrin 0.58mg/kg

2/7/19: Indian Flat Beans – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Profenofos 0.1mg/kg

23/10/19: Parval (pointed gourd)- Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Dimethoate 0.022mg/kg

25/11/19: Indian Flat Beans (surti papdi)- Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Profenofos 0.09mg/kg

24/12/19: Frozen Surti Beans Whole – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.02mg/kg

24/12/19: Frozen Surti Beans Whole – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Fenvalerate 0.56mg/kg

24/12/19: Frozen Surti Beans Whole – Innovative Cuisine (India) – Pesticide: Monocrotophos 0.07mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

18/4/17: Hyper Fresh International (Egypt). Breaches to Australian MRL’s for Mandarins. Pesticide: Cyhalothrin

Hyper Fresh International for Export (Egypt) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Cyhalothrin

18/4/17: Fresh Mandarins – Hyper Fresh International for Export (Egypt) – Pesticide: Cyhalothrin 0.04mg/kg & 0.08mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2018: H-Htet Company Ltd (Myanmar). Breaches to Australian MRL for Betel Leaves. Pesticides: Chlorpyrifos, Metalaxyl

H-Htet Company Ltd (Myanmar) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Metalaxyl, Chlorpyrifos

23/1/18: Fresh Betel Leaves – Harihar Foods Pvt. Ltd (Myanmar) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.23mg/kg

23/1/18: Fresh Betel Leaves – Harihar Foods Pvt. Ltd (Myanmar) – Pesticide: Metalaxyl 0.3mg/kg

29/3/18: Fresh Betel Leaf – Harihar Foods Pvt. Ltd (Myanmar) – Pesticide: Metalaxyl 0.13mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2018/19: Harihar Foods Pvt. Ltd (India). Breaching Australian MRL’s for Grapes and Raisins. Pesticide: Carbendazim

Harihar Foods Pvt. Ltd (India) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim

4/6/18: Dried Grapes – Harihar Foods Pvt. Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 1.7mg/kg

30/8/19: Golden Raisins – Harihar Foods Pvt. Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 0.36mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

25/7/17: Haoxiangni Dates Enterprise Co. Ltd (China). Breached Australian MRL for Dates. Pesticide: Bifenthrin, Propargite, Tebuconazole

Haoxiangni Dates Enterprise Co. Ltd (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Bifenthrin, Propargite, Tebuconazole

25/7/17: Dates – Haoxiangni Dates Enterprise Co. Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Bifenthrin 0.041mg/kg

25/7/17: Dates – Haoxiangni Dates Enterprise Co. Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Propargite 0.678mg/kg

25/7/17: Dates – Haoxiangni Dates Enterprise Co. Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Tebuconazole 0.052mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

10/12/18: Guzel Can Gida Tarim Urunleri (Turkey). Breaching Australian MRL for Apricot. Pesticide: Fenvalerate

Guzel Can Gida Tarim Urunleri Ins. San Ve Tic. Ltd. Sti (Turkey) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Fenvalerate

10/12/18: Dried Apricot – Guzel Can Gida Tarim Urunleri Ins. San Ve Tic. Ltd. Sti (Turkey) – Pesticide: Fenvalerate 0.113mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

17/5/18: Guangzhou Lu Ken Produce Ltd (China). Breaching Australian MRL for Fresh Onion Flowers. Pesticide: Cyhalothrin

Guangzhou Lu Ken Produce Ltd (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Cyhalothrin

17/5/18: Fresh Onion Flowers – Guangzhou Lu Ken Produce Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Cyhalothrin 0.12mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

18/5/17: Guangdong Zhongshan Guzhen Lihua Farming Byproduct Factory (China). Breached Australian MRL for Exported Longan. Pesticides: Carbendazim, Chlorpyrifos

Guangdong Zhongshan Guzhen Lihua Farming Byproduct Factory (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim, Chlorpyrifos

18/5/17: Dried Longan Fruit – Guangdong Zhongshan Guzhen Lihua Farming Byproduct Factory (China) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 0.2mg/kg, Chlorpyrifos 0.04mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

27/9/19: Guang Dong Jiexi Maolin Food Co Ltd (China). Breaches to Australian MRL’s for Dried Hawthorn Fruit. Pesticide: Carbendazim, Tebuconazole

Guang Dong Jiexi Maolin Food Co Ltd (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim, Tebuconazole

27/9/19: Dried Hawthorn Fruit – Guang Dong Jiexi Maolin Food Co Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 0.65mg/kg

27/9/19: Dried Hawthorn Fruit – Guang Dong Jiexi Maolin Food Co Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Tebuconazole 0.12mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2017/19: Global Gourmet Pvt Ltd (India). Multiple breaches Australian MRL’s for Okra and Spinach. Pesticides: Acephate, Chlorpyrifos, Monocrotophos

Global Gourmet Pvt Ltd (India) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Acephate, Monocrotophos, Chlorpyrifos

1/6/17: Okra – Global Gourmet Pvt Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Acephate 0.088mg/kg

1/6/17: Okra – Global Gourmet Pvt Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Monocrotophos 0.091mg/kg

18/7/17: Baby Okra – Global Gourmet Pvt Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Acephate 0.13mg/kg

18/7/17: Baby Okra – Global Gourmet Pvt Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Monocrotophos 0.2mg/kg

18/7/17: Baby Okra – Global Gourmet Pvt Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Acephate 0.053mg/kg

18/7/17: Baby Okra – Global Gourmet Pvt Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Monocrotophos 0.056mg/kg

16/11/17: Baby Okra – Global Gourmet Pvt Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Acephate 0.03mg/kg

6/12/17: Cut Okra – Global Gourmet Pvt Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Acephate 0.06mg/kg

6/12/17: Cut Okra – Global Gourmet Pvt Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Monocrotophos 0.075mg/kg

9/1/18: Baby Okra – Global Gourmet Pvt Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Acephate 0.03mg/kg

9/1/18: Cut Okra – Global Gourmet Pvt Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Acephate 0.07mg/kg

12/4/18: Baby Okra – Global Gourmet Pvt Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Acephate 0.17mg/kg

12/4/18: Baby Okra – Global Gourmet Pvt Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Monocrotophos 0.11mg/kg

18/12/19: Frozen Spinach – Global Gourmet Pvt Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.56mg/kg

15/10/19: Spinach – Global Gourmet Pvt Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.068mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2017/18: Givrex (Egypt). Exporting Cut Green Beans in Breach of Australian MRL. Pesticides: Carbendazim, Chlorpyrifos

Givrex (Egypt) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Chlorpyrifos, Carbendazim

20/9/17: Frozen Cut Green Beans – Givrex (Egypt) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 0.063mg/kg

11/4/18: Cut Green Beans – Givrex (Egypt) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.015mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

28/3/17: Gia Minh Company Limited (Vietnam). Breaching Australian MRL for Red Chilli. Pesticides: Difenconazole, Hexaconazole, Profenofos

Gia Minh Company Limited (Vietnam) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Difenconazole, Hexaconazole, Profenofos

28/3/17: Frozen small red chilli – Gia Minh Company Limited (Vietnam) – Pesticide: Difenconazole 0.092mg/kg, Hexaconazole 0.057mg/kg, Profenofos 0.41mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

7/6/17: Gaozhou City Mingzhu Fruit and Vegetable Company (China). Breach of Australian MRL for Lychee. Pesticides: Carbendazim, Chlorpyrifos, Cypermethrin, Iprodione

Gaozhou City Mingzhu Fruit and Vegetable Co., Ltd (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim, Chlorpyrifos, Cypermethrin, Iprodione

7/6/17: Fresh Chinese Lychee – Gaozhou City Mingzhu Fruit and Vegetable Co.,Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 0.2mg/kg, Chlorpyrifos 0.2mg/kg, Cypermethrin 0.08mg/kg, Iprodione 3mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

3/5/17: Gaoming Hui Sheng Feng Foods (China). Breach of Australian MRL for Dried Red Dates. Pesticides: Tebuconazole

Gaoming Hui Sheng Feng Foods Trading Company of Foshan City (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Tebuconazole

3/5/17: Dried Red Dates – Gaoming Hui Sheng Feng Foods Trading Company of Foshan City (China) – Pesticide: Tebuconazole 0.14mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2018/19: Gaomi Ruifeng Co Ltd (China). Breaching Australian MRL for Exported Spinach. Pesticide: Cyhalothrin, Carbendazim

Gaomi Ruifeng Foods Co Ltd (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim, Cyhalothrin

23/3/18: Frozen Chopped Spinach – Gaomi Ruifeng Foods Co Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Cyhalothrin 0.068mg/kg

30/1/19: Chopped Spinach – Gaomi Ruifeng Foods Co Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 0.052mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2018: Frutisma (Colombia) Exported Blackberry Pulp to Australia breaching MRL. Pesticide: Carbendazim

Frutisma (Colombia) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim

20/7/18: Blackberry Pulp – Frutisima  (Colombia) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 0.49mg/kg

4/10/18: Blackberry Pulp – Frutisima  (Colombia) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 0.28mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2019 October: Fresh Jasmines Export and Import (India). Australian MRL breaches on Betel Leaves. Pesticides: Triadimefon, Chlorpyrifos, Hexaconazole, Metalaxyl

Fresh Jasmines Export and Import Pvt Ltd (India) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Triadimefon, Chlorpyrifos, Hexaconazole, Metalaxyl

2/10/19: Fresh Betel Leaves – Fresh Jasmines Export and Import Pvt Ltd  (India) – Pesticide: Triadimefon 0.058mg/kg

2/10/19: Fresh Betel Leaves – Fresh Jasmines Export and Import Pvt Ltd  (India) – Pesticide: Triadimefon 0.058mg/kg

25/10/19: Fresh Betel Leaves – Fresh Jasmines Export and Import Pvt Ltd  (India) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.043mg/kg

25/10/19: Fresh Betel Leaves – Fresh Jasmines Export and Import Pvt Ltd  (India) – Pesticide: Hexaconazole 0.12mg/kg

25/10/19: Fresh Betel Leaves – Fresh Jasmines Export and Import Pvt Ltd  (India) – Pesticide: Metalaxyl 0.41mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

28/3/18: Food Alliance for Exporting Agricultural Crops (Egypt). Breach of Australian MRL for Oranges. Pesticide: Cyhalothrin

Food Alliance for Exporting Agricultural Crops (Egypt) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Cyhalothrin

28/3/18: Naval Oranges – Food Alliance for Exporting Agricultural Crops (Egypt) – Pesticide: Cyhalothrin 0.23mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2018/19: Finns Frozen Food (India). Breaches to Australian MRL’s for Spinach, Gourd and Indian Beans. Pesticides: Dimethoate, Profenofos, Chlorpyrifos, Cypermethrin

Finns Frozen Foods (India) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Dimethoate, Profenofos, Chlorpyrifos, Cypermethrin

23/5/18: Chopped Spinach – Finns Frozen Foods (India) – Pesticide: Dimethoate 0.086mg/kg

24/9/18: Chopped Spinach – Finns Frozen Foods (India) – Pesticide: Dimethoate 0.075mg/kg

20/11/18: Chopped Spinach – Finns Frozen Foods (India) – Pesticide: Dimethoate 0.025mg/kg

20/11/18: Chopped Spinach – Finns Frozen Foods (India) – Pesticide: Profenofos 0.08mg/kg

21/12/18: Chopped Spinach – Finns Frozen Foods (India) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.28mg/kg

16/7/19: Bitter Gourd – Finns Frozen Foods (India) – Pesticide: Dimethoate 0.026mg/kg

16/7/19: Indian Beans (val papadi) – Finns Frozen Foods (India) – Pesticide: Cypermethrin 0.21mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

11/9/17: Ernteband Fruchaft (Germany). Breached Australian MRL for Strawberry Juice Concentrate. Pesticide: Carbendazim

Ernteband Fruchtsaft Gmbh (Germany) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim

11/9/17: Strawberry Juice Concentrate – Ernteband Fruchtsaft (Germany) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 0.23mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

1/3/18: Elbaraka Fruit for Import and Export (Egypt). Breaches of Australian MRL’s for Fresh Naval Oranges

Elbaraka Fruit for Import and Export (Egypt) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Cyhalothrin

1/3/18: Fresh Naval Oranges – Elbaraka Fruit for Import and Export (Egypt) – Pesticide: Cyhalothrin 0.03mg/kg

1/3/18: Fresh Naval Oranges – Elbaraka Fruit for Import and Export (Egypt) – Pesticide: Cypermethrin 0.38mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

17/4/18: El Waha Co for Export and Supply Agriculture Products (Egypt). Breached Australian MRL for Mandarins. Pesticide: Cyhalothrin

El Waha Co for Export and Supply Agriculture Products (Egypt) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Cyhalotrin

17/4/18: Mandarins – El Waha Co For Export and Supply Agriculture Products (Egypt) – Pesticide: Cyhalothrin 0.059mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

4/3/19: Chuanzhen Industry Co Ltd (China) breached Australian MRL for Dried Long Beans. Pesticide: Thiamethoxam

Chuanzhen Industry Co Ltd (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Thiamethoxam

4/3/19: Dried Long Beans – Chuanzhen Industry Co Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Thiamethoxam 0.3mg/kg

4/3/19: Dried Long Beans – Chuanzhen Industry Co Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Thiamethoxam 0.3mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2018 May: Chengdu Qilihong Food Co Ltd (China). Breaches to Australian MRL’s. Pesticides: Cyhalothrin, Myclobutanil

Chengdu Qilihong Food Co. Ltd (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Cyhalothrin, Myclobutanil

23/5/18: Red Jujube (Chinese Red Dates) – Chengdu Qilihong Food Co. Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Cyhalothrin 0.06mg/kg

23/5/18: Red Jujube (Chinese Red Dates) – Chengdu Qilihong Food Co. Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Myclobutanil 0.41mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

11/11/19: Chanh Thu Export and Import Fruit Company (Vietnam). Breaches to Australian MRL’s. Pesticides: Azoxystrobin, Difenconazole

Chanh Thu Export and Import Fruit Company (Vietnam) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Azoxystrobin, Difenconazole

11/11/19: Fresh Longans – Chanh Thu Export and Import Fruit Company (Vietnam) – Pesticide: Azoxystrobin 0.18mg/kg

11/11/19: Fresh Longans – Chanh Thu Export and Import Fruit Company (Vietnam) – Pesticide: Difenconazole 0.11mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2017/18: Cape Dried Fruit Packers (South Africa). Exporting Dried Apricots exceeding Australian MRL’s. Pesticide: Thiabendazole

Cape Dried Fruit Packers (South Africa) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Thiabendazole

8/6/17: Dried Apricots – Cape Dried Fruit Packers (South Africa) – Pesticide: Thiabendazole 0.076mg/kg

3/4/18: Dried Apricots – Cape Dried Fruit Packers (South Africa) – Pesticide: Thiabendazole 0.11mg/kg

4/4/18: Dried Apricots – Cape Dried Fruit Packers (South Africa) – Pesticide: Thiabendazole 0.076mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2018/19: Cangzhou Ruifeng Date Product Co Ltd (China) Red Dates above Australian Pesticide MRL. Pesticides: Multiple

Cangzhou Ruifeng Date Product Co Ltd (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for: Carbendazim, Cyhalothrin, Cypermethrin, Difenconazole, Myclobutanil, Propiconazole, Tebuconazole,

28/8/18: Red Pitted Dates – Cangzhou Ruifeng Date Product Co Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 0.49mg/kg, Cyhalothrin 0.02mg/kg, Cypermethrin 0.26mg/kg, Difenconazole 0.34mg/kg, Myclobutanil 0.21mg/kg, Propiconazole 0.06mg/kg, Tebuconazole 0.71mg/kg

11/10/19: Red Pitted Dates – Cangzhou Ruifeng Date Product Co Ltd (China) – Carbendazim 0.07mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

19/9/19: Bozhou Haomen Chinese Medicine Co Ltd exporting Chinese Dates above MRL’s. Pesticide: Cypermethrin

Bozhou Haomen Chinese Medicine Co Ltd (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for Cypermethrin

19/9/19: Dried Chinese Dates – Bozhou Haomen Chinese Medicine Co Ltd (China) – Pesticide: Cypermethrin 0.11mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

11/12/18: Bethany Food Korea. Export of Jujube – Multiple pesticides breaching Australian MRL

Bethany Food (Korea) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for Bifenthrin, Cyhalothrin, Hexaconazole, Iprodione, Paclobutrazol, Tebuconazole, Tebufenozide, Triadimefon, Triadimenol

11/12/18: Dried Jujube – Bethany Food (Korea) – Pesticide: Bifenthrin 0.07mg/kg

11/12/18: Dried Jujube – Bethany Food (Korea) – Pesticide: Cyhalothrin 0.026mg/kg

11/12/18: Dried Jujube – Bethany Food (Korea) – Pesticide: Hexaconazole 0.5mg/kg

11/12/18: Dried Jujube – Bethany Food (Korea) – Pesticide: Iprodione 0.11mg/kg

11/12/18: Dried Jujube – Bethany Food (Korea) – Pesticide: Paclobutrazol 0.05mg/kg

11/12/18: Dried Jujube – Bethany Food (Korea) – Pesticide: Tebuconazole 0.18mg/kg

11/12/18: Dried Jujube – Bethany Food (Korea) – Pesticide: Tebufenozide 0.12mg/kg

11/12/18: Dried Jujube – Bethany Food (Korea) – Pesticide: Triadimefon 0.35mg/kg

11/12/18: Dried Jujube – Bethany Food (Korea) – Pesticide: Triadimenol 0.3mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

26/10/17: Best Fruit Co Ltd (Thailand) Breaching MRL’s on Longan Exported into Australia. Pesticides: Carbendazim, Chlorpyrifos

Best Fruit Co Ltd (Thailand) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for Chlorpyrifos, Carbendazim

26/10/17: Fresh Longan – Best Fruit Co Ltd (Thailand) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 0.064mg/kg

26/10/17: Fresh Longan – Best Fruit Co Ltd (Thailand) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.042mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2018 July: Baoding City Just Foods (China) Exporting Strawberries to Australia breaching MRL. Pesticide: Paclobutrazol

Baoding City Just Foods Co. Ltd (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for Paclobutrazol

19/7/18: Strawberries – Baoding City Just Foods (China) – Pesticide: Paclobutrazol 0.03mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2019: Ays Mfg Co Ltd (Myanmar) exporting food to Australia breaching MRL’s. Pesticides: Chlorpyrifos, Cypermethrin

Ays Mfg Co Ltd (Myanmar) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for Chlorpyrifos, Cypermethrin,

29/3/19: Mung dal – Ays Mfg Co Ltd (Myanmar) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.27mg/kg

29/3/19: Mung dhal – Ays Mfg Co Ltd (Myanmar) – Pesticide: Cypermethrin 0.13mg/kg

5/6/19: Mung Chilka Split – Ays Mfg Co Ltd (Myanmar) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.19mg/kg

5/6/19: Mung Chilka Split – Ays Mfg Co Ltd (Myanmar) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.03mg/kg

9/7/19: Split Mung Beans – Ays Mfg Co Ltd (Myanmar) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.33mg/kg

9/7/19: Split Mung Beans – Ays Mfg Co Ltd (Myanmar) – Pesticide: Cypermethrin 0.06mg/kg

22/8/19: Toor dal (pigeon peas) – Ays Mfg Co Ltd (Myanmar) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.12mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2018 March: Asia Foods Nanjing Co Ld (China) Exporting food to Australia breaching MRL’s. Pesticides: Carbendazim, Thiamethoxam

Asia Foods Nanjing Co Ld (China) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for Carbendazim, Thiamethoxam

13/3/18: Frozen Baby Seasoned Baby Soybean – Edamame (China) – Pesticide: Carbendazim 0.092mg/kg

13/3/18: Frozen Baby Seasoned Baby Soybean – Edamame (China) – Pesticide: Thiamethoxam 0.082mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2019: Arctic Agro Foods Pvt Ltd (India) Exporting Chill’s breaching MRL’s into Australia. Pesticides: Monocrotophos, Tebuconazole, Difenconazole

Arctic Agro Foods Pvt Ltd (India) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for Monocrotophos, Tebuconazole, Difenconazole

15/8/19: Frozen Green Chilli  Arctic Agro Foods Pvt Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Monocrotophos 0.07mg/kg

15/8/19: Frozen Green Chilli Arctic Agro Foods Pvt Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Tebuconazole 0.13mg/kg

3/12/19: Frozen Green Chilli’s Arctic Agro Foods Pvt Ltd (India) – Pesticide: Difenconazole 0.17mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

22/2/18: Agro Egypt Agricultural Products (Egypt) exporting food breaching MRL’s into Australia. Pesticide: Cyhalothrin

Agro Egypt for Agricultural Products (Egypt) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for Cyhalothrin

22/2/18: Fresh Naval Oranges. Agro Egypt for Agricultural Products (Egypt) – Pesticide: Cyhalothrin 0.04mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2018/19: Aerath Business Corporation (India). Breaching MRL’s on Food Exports to Australia. Pesticides: Acephate

Aerath Business Corporation (India) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for Acephate

14/9/18: Okra Cut. Aerath Business Corporation (India) – Pesticide: Acephate 3.9mg/kg

26/7/19: Frozen Cut Okra. Aerath Business Corporation (India) – Pesticide: Acephate 0.087mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2018/19: Adf Foods India. Food breaching MRL’s Imported into Australia. Pesticides: Chlorpyrifos, Parathion Ethyl

Adf Foods (India) Exported Food breaching Australian MRL’s for Chlorpyrifos, Parathion Ethyl

22/2/18: Cut Okra. Adf Foods (India) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.19mg/kg

3/1/19: Whole Green Chilli’s. Adf Foods (India) – Pesticide: Parathion Ethyl 0.04mg/kg

15/4/19: Indian Flat Beans. Adf Foods (India) – Pesticide: Chlorpyrifos 0.04mg/kg

Source Failing Food Report – Australian Department of Agriculture (AQIS)

2019 July: Farmer fined stored Barley – North Star (New South Wales). Pesticide: Phosphine

Australian farmers warned the misuse of pesticides will see overseas markets turn away

https://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2019-07-26/chemicals-on-crops-jeopardise-export-markets/11270722

An industry group is warning farmers that they are jeopardising overseas markets by breaching maximum residue levels, resulting in too much chemical found on the end product.

The European Commission describes a maximum residue level (MRL) “as the highest level of a pesticide residue that is legally tolerated in or on food or feed when pesticides are applied correctly”.

It is not just grain crops that have MRLs.

All products from fruit and vegetable crops to meat can have traces of pesticides.

Paul McIntosh from Pulse Australia and the Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative said while Australia had a 98.5 per cent to 99 per cent compliance rate, it was the 1 per cent that were causing disruptions.

“It’s a big issue and it’s really starting to impact on some of our export markets, particularly for our pulse crops overseas,” Mr McIntosh said.

“The issue is we are getting picked up on [being over] our MRLs … particularly with our chickpeas and our mung beans.

“We can’t afford that 1 or 1.5 per cent, we need to get it perfect, we need to be 100 per cent now.

“If we don’t change and the crops go overseas — our clean and green image is going to be severely damaged and we are going to restrict markets.

Farmer fined for alleged misuse of pesticides

The New South Wales Environment Protection Authority (EPA) recently fined a farmer for the alleged incorrect use of pesticides on stored barley grain.

Doolin Farming at North Star was fined $3,500 after the EPA was alerted to elevated phosphine residues in a delivery to Graincorp in Queensland.

In a written statement the EPA said “it is alleged the barley grower had not complied with several requirements relating to the use of pesticides — including that the farmer was not following the directions for use on the pesticide labels, did not hold a current accreditation to use pesticide and did not make a record of the application of the pesticide.”

Srinivas Boyapalli is the Trading and Export Manager for Olam Australia, a company which exports pulses, chickpeas, fava beans, mung beans and lentils.

Mr Boyapalli said the current attention on glyphosate meant countries were taking extra notice of maximum residue levels.

“We have seen one particular issue last year with lentils, which went to India,” he said.

“The importer tested the product and it came out with a glyphosate residue limit [breach] and it was reported to the government, and then the government said the cargo had to be returned or dumped.

“It costs hundreds of thousands of dollars to take back [or dump] rejected cargo.”

Calls for standardised maximum residue levels to make trade easier

However, Mr Boyapalli explained this incident was particularly difficult because India did not have a clear MRL set for glyphosate.

“When they don’t have a maximum residue level it defaults to zero,” he said.

“If it reverts back to zero tolerance it cuts out the trade … when our growers are using glyphosate here to control the weeds.”

Most countries set their own MRL, making it difficult for marketers with the levels constantly changing.

Mr Boyapalli said there is a push for each country to set a standard MRL to make it clear for agricultural marketers.

“Global Pulse Confederation (GPC) is the peak global body and it is working with all countries to have a standardised MRL,” he said.

“GPC [is also] lobbying governments and the United Nations body to accept the minimum residue level limits for all pulse commodities.

“It would be much easier for the trade because if we are sending lentils to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh — it should be the same and it would be easy to follow and easy to explain to growers what the limits are.

2020 February: Senate Inquiry into Possible Bellarine Peninsula Cancer Cluster – Mosquito spraying?

Senate inquiry into possible Bellarine Peninsula cancer cluster now open

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-02-09/bellarine-peninsula-cancer-cluster-senate-inquiry-begins/11931164

Illness has been a major part of Danielle Livingstone’s life.

The palliative care nurse spends her working hours caring for the terminally ill, her adult daughter has Crohn’s disease, her son had ulcerative colitis and three years ago Ms Livingstone was diagnosed with breast cancer.

The idyllic riverside court where she lived in Barwon Heads, on Victoria’s Bellarine Peninsula, had 10 houses and multiple cases of cancer and auto-immune disease.

And after a number of young Barwon Heads locals died from cancer in the space of just a few years, she, like many others in the small coastal community, became concerned the region’s farming history or mosquito spraying programs could have contributed to an increased level of illness.

Amid the community angst, both candidates for a tightly-fought election campaign in the ultra-marginal seat of Corangamite promised a Senate inquiry to investigate the issue.

Ms Livingstone said the inquiry was needed.

“There’s been a lot of community talk,” she said.

“There’s been conversations, many conversations, over the years like ‘is this healthy?'”

Council slams ‘irresponsible’ claims

Mangroves behind Ms Livingstone’s yard were routinely treated with chemicals by the Bellarine Shire and later the City of Greater Geelong — often at the request of the community, who wanted to keep the mosquitoes at bay and minimise the risk of mosquito-borne diseases.

It included aerial treatment, where pellets were dropped from helicopters.

“Where we were was a very heavily sprayed area,” she said.

“You would see the helicopters dropping the pellets.

“You would wake up in the morning and there’d be this low, sort of fog around Barwon Heads.”

Ms Livingstone became particularly concerned when she saw the reported cases of cancer and auto-immune disease plotted out on a map of Barwon Heads.

“It blew my mind. I was shocked, really, really shocked,” she said.

It’s a community fear that authorities have been trying hard to placate in recent years.

The City of Greater Geelong has repeatedly said there was “no scientific basis” to claims linking mosquito treatment to human health impacts, even hosting community meetings to answer questions from frightened residents.

Planning and development director Gareth Smith said any suggestions of a link were “irresponsible” and had the potential to hurt those who had suffered from the impact of serious disease.

“All of the chemicals used in our mosquito treatment programs have been approved as safe products by the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority,” he said.

“These products only affect mosquito larvae and do not harm people, pets or the general environment.”

But he also said council could “empathise” with the community, which was still hurting.

“Sadly, the occurrence of cancer and immunological diseases is not uncommon in any community,” he said.

“The devastating impacts can be widespread and long-lasting.”

A long list of investigations

The Senate inquiry is now open and will investigate the possibility of a cancer cluster on the Bellarine Peninsula.

Submissions close at the end of this month, public hearings will follow and a report is due in August.

But this will not be the first time a government agency has investigated claims of a cancer cluster in the popular holiday spot, located about 90 minutes south of Melbourne.

In January 2019, Victoria’s chief health officer initiated a review of cancer incidence rates for total cancers; breast and liver cancer; and non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, brain cancers and leukaemia.

It used data from the Australian Cancer Atlas and found “no evidence of a higher rate of cancer overall” and “no high number of the specific cancers of interest” on the Bellarine Peninsula than expected based on the average cancer rate in Australia.

A Cancer Council Victoria report from October 2019 also found “no substantive evidence of increased [cancer] incidence” across the peninsula.

This finding was endorsed by an expert advisory group established by the state’s Health Department.

Concerns about possible soil contamination from dieldrin — a pesticide previously used on farms which can contaminate the soil for decades — also prompted the Education Department and WorkSafe to conduct soil tests at Bellarine Secondary College, in the nearby town of Drysdale, in 2018, in a bid to allay community concerns stemming from the fact that a number of the young people who became sick had attended the school.

The report found pesticides, including dieldrin, were found in the soil, but in levels below what is considered harmful to human health.

What will the inquiry achieve?

The Senate inquiry will be chaired by Greens senator Rachel Siewert and will look at residents’ concerns, the incidence of cancer in the area, possible environmental factors and the Victorian chief health officer’s investigation.

Local surf shop owner Ross Harrison, who has led the public campaign for answers, said previous data analyses have not taken into account the holiday town’s transient population.

“We’ve had a mass migration in, and a mass migration out of the township so those people that are presented with disease end up with a different postcode,” he said.

“Also, in coastal townships we have many holiday-makers with houses who have holidayed here for 40 and 50 years, so when they present with disease they present with that disease in their hometown.”

He hopes the bipartisan inquiry will provide the community with some answers.

“We just look forward to a forensic examination of the issues … this can’t be a desktop review,” he said.

“What we are arguing is that there has been a chemical exposure and the epidemiology figures show that so a diligent forensic investigation would be the minimum, I’d imagine.”

Ms Livingstone also hopes this inquiry will put an end to some of the uncertainty.

“I’m just hoping that the truth will be revealed really and that people can tell their story,” she said.

“There’s just so many people down here who’ve been affected by it, who’ve lost loved ones, young people dying unnecessarily and young kids and everyone being sick.

“It’s too much to not be strange.”

2012/19: Warra Weir (Queensland). Pesticides: Atrazine, Atrazine, 2-Hydroxy, DEET, Desethyl Atrazine, Diuron, Fluroxypyr, Hexazinone, Imidacloprid, Metolachlor, Metolachlor-OXA, Simazine, Tebuthiuron, Terbuthylazine

Warra Weir (Queensland)

23/4/12:  Nothing

31/7/12: Imidacloprid 0.03ug/L, Simazine 0.17ug/L. [Total 0.2ug/L 2 pesticides]

24/10/12: Atrazine 0.05ug/L, Hexazinone 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 0.03ug/L, Simazine 0.03ug/L [Total 0.13ug/L 4 pesticides]

16/1/13: Atrazine 0.08ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 0.03ug/L [Total 0.13ug/L 3 pesticides]

10/4/13: Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Imidacloprid 0.07ug/L, Metolachlor 0.03ug/L, Simazine 0.03ug/L [Total 0.16ug/L]

23/7/13: Hexazinone 0.04ug/L, Imidacloprid 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.06ug/L, Simazine 0.05ug/L, Terbuthylazine 2.7ug/L [Total 2.88ug/L 5 pesticides]

23/10/13: Atrazine 0.06ug/L, Hexazinone 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.03ug/L, Simazine 0.09ug/L [Total 0.21 4 pesticides]

22/1/14: Atrazine 0.07ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.02ug/L, Hexazinone 0.03ug/L, Simazine 0.05ug/L [Total 0.17ug/L 4 pesticides]

30/4/14: Atrazine 0.27ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.09ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Diuron 0.05ug/L, Metolachlor 0.93ug/L [Total 1.38ug/L 5 pesticides]

16/7/14: Atrazine 0.2ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.06ug/L, Diuron 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 0.42ug/L [Total 0.7ug/L 4 pesticides]

22/10/14: Atrazine 0.14ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.12ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.05ug/L, Metolachlor 0.17ug/L [Total 0.48ug/L 4 pesticides]

14/1/15: Atrazine 0.15ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.23ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.07ug/L, Metolachlor 3.8ug/L [Total 4.25ug/L 4 pesticides]

21/4/15: Atrazine 0.34ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.07ug/L, Diuron 0.06ug/L, Metolachlor 0.3ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.38ug/L [Total 1.15ug/L 5 pesticides]

21/7/15: Atrazine 0.06ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Diuron 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 0.24ug/L, Simazine 0.07ug/L [Total 0.42ug/L 5 pesticides]

14/10/15: Atrazine 0.07ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.15ug/L, Simazine 0.05ug/L [Total 0.3ug/L 4 pesticides]

16/12/15: Atrazine 0.09ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.09ug/L, Simazine 0.03ug/L, DEET 0.2ug/L [Total 0.44ug/L 5 pesticides]

27/4/16: Atrazine 0.15ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.14ug/L, Metolachlor 0.03ug/L, Simazine 0.02ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.05ug/L [Total 0.39ug/L 5 pesticides]

12/7/16: Atrazine 0.14ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.14ug/L, Simazine 0.02ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L [Total 0.33ug/L 4 pesticides]

19/10/16: Atrazine 0.51ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Diuron 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 1.5ug/L [Total 2.08ug/L 4 pesticides]

4/1/17: Atrazine 0.32ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.07ug/L, Metolachlor 0.61ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.02ug/L [Total 1.02ug/L, 4 pesticides]

11/4/17: Atrazine 0.27ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.05ug/L, Diuron 0.29ug/L, Metolachlor 0.62ug/L [Total 1.23ug/L 4 pesticides]

25/7/17: Atrazine 0.09ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.2ug/L [Total 0.32ug/L 3 pesticides]

17/10/17: Atrazine 0.1ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Metolachlor 0.12ug/L [Total 0.26ug/L 3 pesticides]

17/10/17: Atrazine 0.13ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Metolachlor 0.06ug/L [Total 0.23ug/L 3 pesticides]

9/1/18: Atrazine 0.7ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.11ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Metolachlor 0.34ug/L [Total 1.19ug/L 4 pesticides]

30/4/18: Atrazine 0.52ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.17ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.1ug/L, Diuron 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.8ug/L [1.62ug/L 5 pesticides]

11/7/18: Atrazine 0.43ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.15ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.08ug/L, Metolachlor 0.39ug/L, DEET 1.2ug/L [Total 2.25ug/L 5 pesticides]

16/10/18: Atrazine 4.8ugL, Desethyl Atrazine 0.3ug/L, Metolachlor 9.7ug/L, Simazine 0.03ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.2ug/L, DEET 2.8ug/L [Total 17.83ug/L 6 pesticides]

8/1/19: Desethyl Atrazine 0.7ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.3ug/L, Diuron 0.31ug/L, Imidacloprid 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 6.4ug/L [Total 7.74ug/L 5 pesticides]

9/7/19: Atrazine 0.27ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.27ug/L, Metolachlor 0.27ug/L, DEET 0.7ug/L, Atrazine, 2-Hydroxy 0.7ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.11ug/L, Fluroxypyr 0.25ug/L, Metolachlor-OXA 1.6ug/L [Total 4.17ug/L 8 pesticides]

2012/19: Gil Weir, Miles (Queensland). Pesticides: Atrazine, DEET,Desethyl Atrazine , Hexazinone, Imidacloprid, Metolachlor, Tebuthiuron, Tris (chloropropyl) Phosphate Isomers

Miles, Gil Weir

27/2/12: Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.02ug/L, Imidacloprid 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.4ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.05ug/L, DEET 0.2ug/L [Total: 0.73ug/L  6 pesticides]

29/5/12: Nothing

25/7/12: Tebuthiuron 0.04ug/L

28/8/12: Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L

30/10/12: Tebuthiuron 0.04ug/L

26/3/13: Hexazinone 0.11ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.07ug/L  [Total 0.18ug/L 2 pesticides]

16/7/13: Hexazinone 0.06ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.05ug/L [Total: 0.11ug/L 2 pesticides]

25/9/13: Hexazinone 0.06ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.05ug/L [Total 0.11ug/L 2 pesticides]

28/10/13: Hexazinone 0.06ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.05ug/L [Total 0.11ug/L  2 pesticides]

22/4/14: Nothing

29/7/14: Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L

29/11/14: Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L, Tris (chloropropyl) Phosphate Isomers 0.3ug/L [Total 0.33ug/L, 2 pesticides]

25/3/15: Tebuthiuron 0.05ug/L

29/4/15: Tebuthiuron 0.06ug/L

22/7/15: Tebuthiuron 0.05ug/L

28/10/15: Tebuthiuron 0.06ug/L

27/1/16: Tebuthiuron 0.06ug/L

27/4/16: Metolachlor 0.03ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.06ug/L [Total 0.09ug/L 2 pesticides]

27/7/16: Metolachlor 0.02ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.06ug/L (Total 0.08ug/L, 2 pesticides]

26/10/16: Hexazinone 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 0.18ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.05ug/L [Total 0.25ug/L 3 pesticides]

24/1/17: Hexazinone 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 0.11ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.07ug/L [Total 0.2ug/L 3 pesticides]

3/5/17: Hexazinone 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 0.06ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.08ug/L [Total 0.16ug/L 3 pesticides]

26/7/17: Metolachlor 0.03ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.06ug/L [Total 0.09ug/L 2 pesticides]

25/10/17: Metolachlor 0.02ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.05ug/L [Total 0.07ug/L 2 pesticides]

30/1/18: Hexazinone 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.03ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.09ug/L {Total 0.15ug/L 3 pesticides]

26/4/18: Tebuthiuron 0.02ug/L

25/7/18: Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L

30/10/18: Metolachlor 0.03ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.05ug/L [Total 0.08ug/L 2 pesticides]

30/1/19 (Miles Weir): Atrazine 0.02ug/L, Hexazinone 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.02ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.07ug/L [Total 0.14ug/L 4 pesticides]

16/4/19: (Miles Weir): Diuron 0.12ug/L, Metolachlor 0.1ug/L [Total 0.22ug/L 2 pesticides]

23/7/19: (Miles Weir): Diuron 0.09ug/L, Hexazinone 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 0.12ug/L [Total 0.23ug/L 3 pesticides]

2014/18: Jandowae Rotary Park Reticulated Drinking Water (Queensland). Pesticides: Atrazine, Desethyl Atrazine, Metolachlor, N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide, Simazine, Tebuthiuron,

Jandowae Rotary Park Reticulation

9/4/14: Atrazine 0.25ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.07ug/L, Metolachlor 0.13ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L [Total 0.48ug/L 4 pesticides]

4/11/15:  Atrazine 0.1ug/L, Metolachlor 0.1ug/L, N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 0.6ug/L [Total 0.8ug/L 3 pesticides]

8/12/15: Atrazine 0.07ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 0.12ug/L, N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 0.3ug/L [Total 0.24ug/L 4 pesticides]

16/3/16: Atrazine 0.09ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.08ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.07ug/L [Total 0.27ug/L 4 pesticides]

26/10/16: Atrazine 0.29ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.17ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.08ug/L, Metolachlor 1.7ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.07ug/L [Total 2.31ug/L 5 pesticides]

11/1/17: Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.12ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.05ug/L, Metolachlor 0.77ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.05ug/L [Total 1.02ug/L 5 pesticides]

18/10/17: Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.21ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L [Total 0.27ug/L 3 pesticides]

15/10/18: Metolachlor 0.34ug/L, Simazine 0.03ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.04ug/L [Total 0.41ug/L 3 pesticides]

2013-18: Jandowae Bores (Queensland). Pesticides: Atrazine, Desethyl Atrazine, Dieldrin, Imidacloprid, Metolachlor, N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide, Tebuthiuron

Jandowae Combined Bores

3/4/13: Atrazine 0.17ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.05ug/L, Metolachlor 0.19ug/L [Total 0.41ug/L 3 pesticides]

Jandowae Bore 1

9/7/13: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 6.1ug/L

25/2/14: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 4.5ug/L

9/4/14:  N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 1.6ug/L

31/7/14: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 4ug/L

28/1/15: Atrazine 0.13ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.06ug/L, Metolachlor 0.06ug/L [Total 0.25ug/L 3 pesticides]

24/3/15: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 3.8ug/L

29/7/15: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 4.3ug/L

9/9/15: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 3.2ug/L

4/11/15: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 2.9ug/L

16/3/16: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 0.4ug/L

25/7/16: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 4.2ug/L

27/9/16: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 3.9ug/L

26/10/16: Acetone 3.7ug/L, N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 5.2ug/L [Total 8.9ug/L 2 pesticides]

11/1/17: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 1.3ug/L

18/10/17: Nothing

15/10/18: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 0.7g/L

 

Jandowae Bore 2

9/7/13: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 4.4ug/L

25/2/14: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 4.1ug/L

9/4/14: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 0.5ug/L

31/7/14: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 3.7ug/L

28/1/15: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 5.7ug/L, Dieldrin 0.2ug/L [Total 5.9ug/L 2 “pesticides”]

24/3/15: Imidacloprid 0.02ug/L, Dieldrin 0.05ug/L N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 2.3ug/L[Total 2.37ug/L 3 pesticides]

29/7/15: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 6.1ug/L, Dieldrin 0.2ug/L [Total 6.3ug/L 2 pesticides]

9/9/15: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 2.7ug/L, Dieldrin 0.1ug/L [Total 2.8ug/L 2 pesticides]

4/11/15: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 3ug/L, Dieldrin 0.2ug/L [Total 3.2ug/L 2 pesticides]

8/12/15: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 2ug/L

16/3/16:  Nothing

25/7/16: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 2.6ug/L

27/9/16: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 3.8ug/L, Dieldrin 0.2ug/L [Total 4ug/L 2 pesticides]

26/10/16: Acetone 3.3ug/L, N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 2.9ug/L [Total 6.2ug/L 2 pesticides]

11/1/17: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 1.4ug/L

 

Jandowae Bore 6

25/2/14: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 3.6ug/L

9/4/14: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 1.4ug/L

31/7/14: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 2.9ug/L

11/1/17: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 4.1ug/L

18/10/17: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 4ug/L

15/10/18: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 2ug/L

Jandowae WTP Bore

3/4/13: Atrazine 0.13ug/L, Metolachlor 0.09ug/L [Total 0.22ug/L, 2 pesticides]

9/7/13: Nothing

25/2/14: Nothing

31/7/14: Nothing

28/1/15: Nothing

29/7/15: Nothing

4/11/15: Nothing

8/12/15: Nothing

16/3/16:  Nothing

25/7/16: Nothing

26/10/16: Acetone 2.6ug/L

11/1/17: Nothing

18/10/17: Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.22ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.04ug/L [Total 0.29ug/L 3 pesticides]

15/10/18: Nothing

2012-2019: Jandowae Dam (Queensland). Pesticides: 2,4-D, Atrazine, Atrazine, 2-hydroxy, Desethyl Atrazine, Desisopropyl Atrazine, Dimethoate, Diuron, Fluroxypur, Imazethapyr, Metolachlor, Metolachlor-OXA, Simazine, 2,4-Di-t-butylphenol, Terbuthylazine,

Jandowae Dam

3/4/12:  Atrazine 0.26ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.23ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.09ug/L, Metolachlor 1.2ug/L [Total: 1.78ug/L  4 pesticides]

24/7/12: Atrazine 0.14ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.11ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.33ug/L, Diuron 0.61ug/L, Metolachlor 0.47ug/L, Simazine 1.93ug/L [Total: 3.59ug/L 6 pesticides]

10/10/12: Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.11ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.29ug/L, Diuron 0.31ug/L, Metolachlor 0.31ug/L, Simazine 0.37ug/L [Total: 1.42ug/L 6 pesticides].

23/1/13: Atrazine 0.35ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.23ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.35ug/L, Diuron 0.13ug/L, Metolachlor 0.7ug/L, Simazine 0.34ug/L [Total 2.1ug/L 6 pesticides].

3/4/13: Atrazine 0.16ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.06ug/L, Metolachlor 0.09ug/L  [Total 0.31ug/L 3 pesticides]

9/7/13: Atrazine 0.17ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.08ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Metolachlor 0.09ug/L [Total 0.38ug/L 4 pesticides]

8/10/13: Atrazine 0.16ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.07ug/L, Metolachlor 0.07ug/L [Total 0.3ug/L 3 pesticides]

25/2/14: Atrazine 0.26ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.11ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Metolachlor 0.09ug/L [Total 0.5ug/L 4 pesticides]

9/4/14: Atrazine 0.26ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.07ug/L, Diuron 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.14ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L [Total 0.53ug/L 5 pesticides]

30/7/14: Atrazine 0.2ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.07ug/L, Metolachlor 0.07ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L [Total 0.37ug/L 4 pesticides]

15/10/14: Atrazine 0.21ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.07ug/L, Metalochlor 0.09ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L [0.4ug/L 4 pesticides]

28/1/15: Atrazine 0.23ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.08ug/L, Metolachlor 0.07ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L [Total 0.41ug/L 4 pesticides]

24/3/15: Atrazine 0.21ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.08ug/L, Metolachlor 0.06ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L [Total 0.38ug/L 4 pesticides]

27/4/15: Atrazine 0.29ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.11ug/L, Metolachlor 0.07ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L [Total 0.5ug/L 4 pesticides]

29/7/15: Atrazine 0.06ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.16ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.09ug/L [Total 0.34ug/L 4 pesticides]

9/9/15: Metolachor 0.2ug/L, 2,4-Di-t-butylphenol 0.2ug/L [Total 0.4ug/L, 2 pesticides]

4/11/15: Atrazine 0.1ug/L, Metolachlor 0.2ug/L [Total 0.3ug/L 2 pesticides]

8/12/15: Atrazine 0.08ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Metolachlor 0.13ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.09ug/L [Total 0.34ug/L pesticides 4]

16/3/16: Atrazine 0.1ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.05ug/L, Metolachlor 0.1ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.09ug/L [Total 0.34ug/L 4 pesticides]

25/7/16: Atrazine 0.09ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.05ug/L, Metolachlor 0.07ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.09ug/L [Total 0.3ug/L 4 pesticides]

27/9/16: Atrazine 12ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.82ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.44ug/L, Metolachlor 7.6ug/L, Simazine 0.06ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.06ug/L [Total 20.98ug/L 6 pesticides]

26/10/16: Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.22ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.11ug/L, Metolachlor 1.7ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.07ug/L [Total 2.13ug/L 5 pesticides]

11/1/17: Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.24ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.12ug/L, Metolachlor 1.6ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.08ug/L [Total 2.08ug/L 5 pesticides]

26/7/17: Atrazine 0.05ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.08ug/L, Metolachlor 0.39ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.05ug/L [Total 0.57ug/L 4 pesticides]

18/10/17: Atrazine 0.21ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.08ug/L, Metolachlor 0.88ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.05ug/L  [Total 1.22ug/L 4 pesticides]

10/1/18: Atrazine 0.09ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.09ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Metolachlor 0.3ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.05ug/L [Total 0.37ug/L 5 pesticides]

5/3/18: Atrazine 0.17ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.06ug/L, Terbuthylazine 0.02ug/L, Dimethoate 0.2ug/L, 2,4-D 0.04ug/L, Atrazine, 2-hydroxy 0.45ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.08ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.05ug/L, Fluroxypur 0.11ug/L, Imazethapyr 0.02ug/L, Isoxaflutole Metabolite (DKN) 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 1.4ug/L, Metolachlor-OXA 1ug/L [Total: 2.91ug/L 13 pesticides]

5/3/18: Atrazine 0.11ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.06ug/L, Metolachlor 1.4ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L, Dimethoate 0.2ug/L, Tebuconazole 0.2ug/L [Total 2ug/L 6 pesticides]

30/4/18: Atrazine 0.1ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.06ug/L, Metolachor 0.69ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L, DEET 0.3ug/L [Total 1.18ug/L 5 pesticides]

15/10/18: Metolachor 0.42ug/L, Simazine 0.03ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.04ug/L [Total 0.49ug/L 3 pesticides]

22/1/19: Atrazine 0.1ug/L, Metolachlor 0.5ug/L, 2,4-D 0.15ug/L, Metolachlor-OXA 0.34ug/L [Total 1.09ug/L 4 pesticides]

9/7/19: Atrazine 0.16ug/L, Metolachlor 0.37ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.04ug/L, Terbuthylazine 0.01ug/L,Atrazine, 2-Hydroxy 0.36ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Fluroxypur 0.07ug/L, Isoxaflutole Metabolite (DKN) 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor-OXA 0.4ug/L, [Total 1.5ug/L 9 pesticides]

2012/19: Condamine Weir (Queensland). Pesticides: Ametryn, Atrazine, Desethyl Atrazine, DEET, Desisopropyl Atrazine, Atrazine, 2-Hydroxy, Diuron, Fluroxypur, Hexazinone, Imidacloprid, Metolachlor, Metolachlor-OXA,Tebuthiuron,

Condamine Condamine Weir

27/2/12: Ametryn 0.01ug/L, Atrazine 0.17ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.19ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.07ug/L, Diuron 0.03ug/L, Imidacloprid 0.01ug/L, Metolachlor 0.25ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.49ug/L, DEET 0.2ug/L [Total: 1.42ug/L  9 pesticides]

29/5/12: Nothing

26/4/13: Atrazine 0.09ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.05ug/L, Imidacloprid 1.7ug/L, Metolachlor 0.13ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L, DEET 0.5ug/L [Total 2.5ug/L 6 pesticides]

28/5/13: Atrazine 0.02ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L [Total 0.05ug/L 2 pesticides]

29/10/13: Hexazinone 0.02ug/L

22/4/14: Atrazine 0.22ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.06ug/L, Diuron 0.06ug/L, Metolachlor 0.62ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.06ug/L [Total 1ug/L 5 pesticides]

30/7/14: Atrazine 0.16ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.06ug/L, Metolachlor 0.28ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.04ug/L [Total 0.54ug/L 4 pesticides]

29/10/14: Atrazine 0.15ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.06ug/L, Metolachlor 0.19ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.05ug/L [Total 0.45ug/L 4 pesticides]

19/1/15: Atrazine 0.13ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Metolachlor 0.19ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.17ug/L [Total 0.53ug/L 4 pesticides]

29/4/15: Atrazine 0.09ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Hexazinone 0.04ug/L, Metolachlor 0.1ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L [Total 0.3ug/L 5 pesticides]

21/7/15: Atrazine 0.13ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.06ug/L, Diuron 0.05ug/L, Metolachlor 0.36ug/L, Simazine 0.05ug/L [Total 0.65ug/L 5 pesticides]

28/10/15: Atrazine 0.11ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.06ug/L, Metolachlor 0.19ug/L, Simazine 0.03ug/L [Total 0.39ug/L 4 pesticides]

27/1/16: Atrazine 0.12ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Diuron 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 0.27ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.04ug/L [Total 0.49ug/L 5 pesticides]

27/4/16: Atrazine 0.2ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Hexazinone 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.16ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.11ug/L [Total 0.54ug/L pesticides 5]

26/7/16: Atrazine 0.15ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Hexazinone 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.1ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.09ug/L [Total 0.4ug/L 5 pesticides].

26/10/16: Atrazine 0.13ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.02ug/L, Diuron 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 1.2ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.09ug/L [Total 1.46ug/L 5 pesticides]

24/1/17: Atrazine 0.06ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.02ug/L, Hexazinone 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 1.2ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.08ug/L [Total 1.38ug/L 5 pesticides]

3/5/17: Atrazine 0.16ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Diuron 0.1ug/L, Metolachlor 0.38ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.08ug/L [Total 0.76ug/L 5 pesticides]

26/7/17: Atrazine 0.12ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Diuron 0.04ug/L, Metolachlor 0.27ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.1ug/L [Total 0.56ug/l 5 pesticides]

24/10/17: Atrazine 0.1ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Metolachlor 0.12ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.06ug/L [Total 0.32ug/L 4 pesticides]

30/1/18: Atrazine 0.1ug/, Desethyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Metolachlor 0.05ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.96ug/L [1.15ug/L 4 pesticides]

26/4/18: Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Metolachlor 0.08ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.08ug/L [Total 0.2ug/L 3 pesticides]

30/7/18: Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.05ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.09ug/L [Total 0.17ug/L 3 pesticides]

29/1/19: Atrazine 0.08ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.5ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.57ug/L, Diuron 0.23ug/L, Imidacloprid 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 7.6ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.09ug/L [Total 9.09ug/L 7 pesticides]

16/4/19: Atrazine 0.1ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.1ug/L, Diuron 0.2ug/L, Metolachlor 0.49ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.17ug/L [Total 1.06ug/L 5 pesticides]

23/7/19: Atrazine 0.19ug/L, Diuron 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 0.46ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.2ug/L, Atrazine, 2-Hydroxy 0.13ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.13ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.08ug/L, Fluroxypyr 0.11ug/L, Metolachlor-OXA 0.5ug/L, [Total 1.82ug/L 9 pesticides]

2012-2017 – Condamine River, Chinchilla. Pesticides:

Chinchilla Condamine River

17/4/12: Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 0.05ug/L  [Total: 0.11ug/L  3 pesticides]

25/7/12: Atrazine 0.06ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.1ug/L, Diuron 0.25ug/L, Hexazinone 0.03ug/L, Imidacloprid 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.06ug/L, Simazine 0.34ug/L [Total: 0.91ug/L 8 pesticides]

18/10/12: Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.05ug/L, Diuron 0.11ug/L, Simazine 0.18ug/L. [Total 0.4ug/L 5 pesticides]

21/2/13: Atrazine 0.58ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.1ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.05ug/L, Diuron 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 0.87ug/L [Total 1.62ug/L 5 pesticides]

2/4/13: Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Metolachlor 0.06ug/L

31/7/13: Hexazinone 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.03ug/L, Simazine 0.05ug/L, Terbuthylazine 0.3ug/L [Total 0.41ug/L 4 pesticides]

29/10/13: Atrazine 0.43ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.05ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Hexazinone 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 0.05ug/L, Simazine 0.25ug/L, Terbuthylazine 0.5ug/L [Total 1.34ug/L 7 pesticides]

29/1/14: Atrazine 0.37ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.06ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Metolachlor 0.03ug/L, Simazine 0.19ug/L, Terbuthylazine 0.3ug/L [Total 0.89ug/L 6 pesticides]

30/4/14: Atrazine 0.35ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.1ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.05ug/L, Diuron 0.1ug/L, Metolachlor 1.2ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.07ug/L [Total 1.87ug/L 6 pesticides]

22/7/14: Atrazine 0.29ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.08ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Diuron 0.07ug/L, Metolachlor 0.66ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.06ug/L [Total 1.2ug/L 6 pesticides]

28/10/14: Atrazine 0.18ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.06ug/L, Diuron 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.32ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.04ug/L [Total 0.63ug/L 5 pesticides]

21/1/15: Atrazine 0.24ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.08ug/L, Diuron 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.25ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.04ug/L [Total 0.64ug/L 5 pesticides]

21/4/15: Atrazine 0.62ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.23ug/L, Desisopropyl Atrazine 0.07ug/L, Diuron 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 1.4ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L [Total 2.37ug/L 6 pesticides]

22/7/15: Atrazine 0.1ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Diuron 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.28ug/L, Simazine 0.05ug/L [Total 0.5ug/L pesticides 5]

26/7/17: Atrazine 0.2ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Diuron 0.15ug/L, Metolachlor 0.5ug/L [Total 0.44ug/L 4 pesticides]

2012-2019: Bell (Queensland). Pesticides: Atrazine, Desethyl Atrazine, Metolachlor, Tebuthiuron, N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide

Bell Queensland

Koondaii Dam, Bell

23/4/12: Nothing

24/7/12: Atrazine 0.02ug/L [Total: 0.02ug/L 1 pesticide]

16/10/12: Atrazine 0.02ug/L [Total 0.02ug/L 1 pesticide]

19/3/13: Atrazine 0.21ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.23ug/L, Tebuthiruon 0.03ug/L [Total: 0.5ug/L 4 pesticides]

15/4/13: Atrazine 0.17ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.18ug/L, [Total 0.38ug/L 3 pesticides]

31/7/13: Atrazine 0.12ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.1ug/L [Total 0.25ug/L 3 pesticides]

23/10/13: Atrazine 0.13ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Metolachlor 0.03ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.03ug/L [Total 0.23ug/L 4 pesticides]

28/1/14: Atrazine 0.14ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.05ug/L [Total 0.22ug/L 3 pesticides]

30/4/14: Atrazine 0.1ug/L, Desethyl Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.05ug/L [Total 0.19ug/L 3 pesticides]

23/7/14: Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.04ug/L [Total 0.07ug/L 2 pesticides]

22/10/14: Ametryn 0.02ug/L, Atrazine 0.03ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.05ug/L [Total 0.1ug/L 3 pesticides]

14/1/19: Atrazine 0.1ug/L, Metolachor 0.2ug/L, Tebuthiuron 0.4ug/L [Total 0.7ug/L 3 pesticides]

Bell Bore

15/4/13: Nothing

23/10/13: Nothing

22/10/14: Nothing

20/10/15: Nothing

27/4/16: Nothing

13/7/16: Nothing

5/10/16: Nothing

17/10/17: Nothing

Bell WTP

15/4/13: Nothing

23/10/13: Nothing

22/10/14: Nothing

20/10/15: Nothing

27/4/16: Nothing

5/10/16: Nothing

17/10/17: Nothing

Bell Racecourse Bore

15/4/15: Nothing

16/10/18: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 7.2ug/L

Bell – Warmga Bore

21/2/18: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 0.2ug/L

16/10/18:  N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 0.1ug/L

Bell – Cattle Creek Bore

21/2/18: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 4.9ug/L

Bell – Koondaii Bore 1

21/2/18:  N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 4.9ug/L

Bell – Koondaii Bore 2

21/2/18: N-Butylbenzenesulfonamide 15ug/L

2019 December: Spray Drift Fine (Bellata, NSW)

Bellata farmer fined for pesticide spray drift

https://www.northerndailyleader.com.au/story/6552591/environmental-watchdog-fines-farmer-for-pesticide-drift/

Dec 19 2019

The NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA) has reminded farmers not to damage neighbouring crops or the environment while spraying pesticides after the Belatta incident

EPA regional director Adam Gilligan said spraying crops in the wrong conditions could cause damage to other crops on nearby farms.

The fine followed complaints from another farmer about a neighbour applying pesticides using a spray boom in windy conditions on September 10.

The farmer reported the spray crossed onto his property, impacting a native vegetation corridor.

The EPA’s investigation found the pesticide in the native vegetation corridor over 50 metres away and that while the spraying was taking place, the wind conditions were gusty and variable and at times blowing toward the vegetation corridor.

“Safe pesticide use relies on users spraying in appropriate weather conditions and following the label instructions,” Mr Gilligan said.

“The proper use of pesticides helps to ensure the safety of the operators, the environment and the local community.”

Mr Gilligan said the $750 fine was a reminder of the importance of being a good neighbour when applying or using pesticides.

Penalty notices are one of several tools the EPA can use to achieve environmental compliance.

If you are concerned about illegal pesticide use, or you have knowledge of an incident, please call the 24/7 Environment Line on 131 555.

2018/19 – Hearnes Lake, Coffs Harbour (New South Wales) – Chlorpyrifos

Pesticide use at Hearnes Lake non-compliant

September 5 2019

An investigation into a fish kill at Hearnes Lake, north of Coffs Harbour, has found 25 instances of alleged non-compliance with pesticide use.

Investigations were carried out by the EPA, following the fish kill in March last year, but found no evidence to directly link the alleged non-compliances with the dead fish.

The EPA says they were unable to identify the cause or sources of the high levels of chlorpyrifos found in the fish samples – however the pesticide is used in horticulture and for residential termite treatments – both of which occur in the area.

Pesticide use at Hearnes Lake non-compliant

2017/18: Biloela (Queensland). Pesticides: Multiple

2017/18: Biloela (Queensland)

Biloela Bore Water

Chlordene-1-hydroxy (metabolite of Chlordane or Heptachlor?):  4.1ug/L (max), 0.66ug/L (av.)

Chlordene-1-hydroxy epoxide (metabolite of Chlordane or Heptachlor?): 0.4ug/L (max), 0.22ug/L (av.)

Dicofol: 3.2ug/L (max), 2.98ug/L (av.)

Endosulfan (Total): 1.5ug/L (max), 1.41ug/L (av.)

1-H-Benzotriazole (anti-corrosive/aircraft de-icer/pesticide precursor): 1.5ug/L (max), 1.41ug/L (av.)

1-H-Benzotriazole S-Methyl (anti-corrosive/aircraft de-icer/pesticide precursor): 1ug/L (max), 0.47ug/L (av.)

Moclobemide (anti depressant drug): 2.1ug/L (max), 1.98ug/L (av.)

Oxadiazon: 0.4ug/L (max), 0.21ug/L (av.)

2017/18: Biloela (Queensland)

Biloela Raw Dam

Chlordene-1-hydroxy (metabolite of Chlordane or Heptachlor?):  1.9ug/L (max), 1.05ug/L (av.)

1-H-Benzotriazole S-Methyl: 1.9ug/L (max), 1.15ug/L (av.)

2017/18: Biloela (Queensland)

Biloela Potable

Chlordene-1-hydroxy (metabolite of Chlordane or Heptachlor?):  1.9ug/L (max), 0.54ug/L (av.)

Dicofol: 3.2ug/L (max), 2.98ug/L (av.)

Endosulfan (Total): 1.5ug/L (max), 1.41ug/L (av.)

1-H-Benzotriazole (anti-corrosive/aircraft de-icer/pesticide precursor): 1.5ug/L (max), 1.41ug/L (av.)

1-H-Benzotriazole S-Methyl (anti-corrosive/aircraft de-icer/pesticide precursor): 1.9ug/L (max), 0.7ug/L (av.)

Moclobemide (anti depressant drug): 2.1ug/L (max), 1.98ug/L (av.)

Oxadiazon: 0.4ug/L (max), 0.24ug/L (av.)

 

2017/19: Coffs Harbour Local Government Area (New South Wales). Pesticides: Diuron, Carbendazim, Boscalid, Propiconazole, Terbutryn, Metolachlor

Assessment of Drinking Water Tanks in Close Proximity to Intensive Plant Agriculture in the Coffs Harbour Local Government Area 2017-2019

Coffs Harbour City Council

Rainwater Tank 001: Distance from Maize 40m, Blueberries 111m, Macadamias 570m. Metolachlor 0.03ug/L (13/11/17) and 0.04ug/L (4/12/17).

Rainwater Tank 005: Distance from Blueberries 25m. Terbutryn 0.19ug/L (22/1/19).

Rainwater Tank 011: Distance from Blueberries 225m. Propiconazole 0.04ug/L (3/6/19).

Rainwater Tank 012: Distance from Blueberries 170m. Boscalid 0.03ug/L (12/9/18).

Rainwater Tank 017: Distance from Berries  and Bananas 40m. Diuron 0.14ug/L (26/2/19), Diuron 0.12ug/L (5/6/19).

Rainwater Tank 020: Distance from Berries  and Bananas 110m. Carbendazim 0.25ug/L (26/2/19), Diuron 2.88ug/L (26/2/19), Diuron 2.6ug/L (3/6/19), Diuron 1.24ug/L (25/6/19)

 

2018/19 – Barmah (Victoria) – DBCP (1,2-Dibromo-3-Chloropropane)

2018/19 – Barmah Victoria (Pesticide – Soil Fumigant, Nematocide)

“Single detection of 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane in the raw water. At the time of the detection powdered activated carbon was operational in the treatment plant. The risk of WTP breakthrough was low, and all subsequent samples were below the limit of reporting. DBCP Is not listed in the ADWG but the WHO standard was used instead.”  https://www.gvwater.vic.gov.au/Portals/0/GV-Water/Documents/Reports/Water%20Quality%20Annual%20Report%20201819%20Goulburn%20Valley%20Water%20-%20Final%20PDF.pdf?ver=2019-10-30-085222-843

1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP) was used in the past as a soil fumigant and nematocide on crops; it is no longer used except as an intermediate in chemical synthesis. Acute (short-term) exposure to DBCP in humans results in moderate depression of the central nervous system (CNS) and pulmonary congestion from inhalation, and gastrointestinal distress and pulmonary edema from oral exposure. Chronic (long-term) exposure to DBCP in humans causes male reproductive effects, such as decreased sperm counts. Testicular effects and decreased sperm counts were observed in animals chronically exposed to DBCP by inhalation. Available human data on DBCP and cancer are inadequate. High incidences of tumors of the nasal tract, tongue, adrenal cortex, and lungs of rodents were reported in a National Toxicology Program (NTP) inhalation study. EPA has classified DBCP as a Group B2, probable human carcinogen.

2018/19: Goulburn River, Alexandra (Victoria) – Glyphosate

2018/19: Goulburn River, Alexandra (Victoria) – Glyphosate

All the pesticides tested in the source water were reported by the NATA laboratory at values below the level of reporting with the exception of a single detection of glyphosate below the health limit in the source water at Alexandra. A subsequent resample was below the limit of reporting.

https://www.gvwater.vic.gov.au/Portals/0/GV-Water/Documents/Reports/Water%20Quality%20Annual%20Report%20201819%20Goulburn%20Valley%20Water%20-%20Final%20PDF.pdf?ver=2019-10-30-085222-843

2013/18: Nebo Road Water Treatment Plant (Mackay, Queensland). Pesticides: Atrazine, Dinoseb, Diuron, Hexazinone

Australian Record for Diuron in drinking water

Date of Non-Compliance: February & March 2013

Date of Notification: 5 November 2013

Scheme: Mackay – Nebo Rd Treated Water – Diuron and Atrazine (pesticides)

390 μg/L & 350 μg/L. These levels are 19.5 and 17.5 times over guidelines levels.

Guideline levels for both pesticides are 20 μg/L.

Routine monitoring of drinking water detected Diuron and Atrazine in the treated water at Nebo Rd WTP at elevated levels which exceed the ADWG 2011 Health guideline value of 20 μg/L and 20 μg/L respectively. High levels of chemicals were also detected in the sample of the incoming raw water to the WTP collected on the same day as the treated water. Analysis of rainfall data for Mackay indicates that prior to the detections a significant rainfall event occurred which is likely to have washed sediments and chemicals into the Pioneer River which is the raw water source for Nebo Rd WTP.

A failure of the mass spectrometer at the Mackay Water and Waste Services Scientific and Analytical Services Laboratory (SAS) resulted in samples collected from August 2012 to April 2013 to not be analysed by SAS and instead sent to QLD Health laboratory for analysis. This resulted in a delay in obtaining results and analysing the results to identify non-compliances.

Source: Mackay Drinking Water Quality Management Plan 2013-14

Nebo Road Water Treatment Plant (Raw Water)

November 2017: Atrazine 0.2468ug/L

December 2017: Atrazine 0.8155ug/L, Diuron 0.6916ug/L

January 2018: Atrazine 0.394ug/L, Diuron 0.6148ug/L, Hexazinone 0.2612ug/L

February 2018: Atrazine 0.0755ug/L, Diuron 0.4473ug/L

March 2018: Atrazine 0.3342ug/L, Diuron 0.7559ug/L, Hexazinone 0.4089ug/L

April 2018: Atrazine 0.2038ug/L, Diuron 0.4794ug/L

May 2018: Dinoseb 0.001ug/L

Source: Mackay Drinking Water Quality Management Plan 2017-18

2017/18: Marian Water Treatment Plant (Queensland). Pesticides: Atrazine, Dinoseb, Diuron, Hexazinone, Metolachlor

Marian Water Treatment Plant (Raw Water)

November 2017: Atrazine 0.4478ug/L, Diuron 0.5744ug/L, Hexazinone 0.1073ug/L, Metolachlor 0.1248ug/L

December 2017: Atrazine 0.8298ug/L, Diuron 1.4509ug/L

January 2018: Atrazine 0.4404ug/L, Diuron 0.3382ug/L

February 2018: Atrazine 1.1076ug/L, Diuron 1.5455ug/L, Hexazinone 0.4357ug/L

March 2018: Atrazine 0.1891ug/L, Diuron 0.8048ug/L, Hexazinone 0.4098ug/L

April 2018: Diuron 0.1434ug/L

May 2018: Dinoseb 0.001ug/L

Source: Mackay Drinking Water Quality Management Plan 2017-18

2015: Terrace Hill, Waterstone Hill (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, Myclobutanil, Trifloxystrobin

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent, Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Terrace Way @ Waterstone Hill

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 330ug/kg, Myclobutanil 15.2ug/kg, Trifloxystrobin 8.8ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Eaststone Avenue, Wollert (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Trifloxystrobin

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent, Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Edgars ck GGF wetland, ds Eaststone Ave, Wollert

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 34.4ug/kg, DEET 4ug/kg, Trifloxystrobin 10.8ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Rix Rd, Officer (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent, Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Rix Rd GGF wetland pond, Cyan Cr; Officer

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 5.6ug/kg, DEET 8.4ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Flanagan Avenue, Officer (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Iprodione

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent, Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Gum scrub ck (lwr) GGF pond 1, Flanagan Ave; Officer

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 2ug/kg, DEET 8.8ug/kg, Iprodione 84.5ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Edgars Road, Epping (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent, Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Melbourne Wholesale Market GGF pond, near Edgars Rd, Epping

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin Trace, DEET 8.8ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Rippleside Terrace, Tarneit (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Dimethoate, Prometryn, Simazine

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent, Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Sayers Drain wetland; cnr Rippleside Terrace and Mirror Ave, Tarneit

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 4ug/kg, DEET 11ug/kg, Dimethoate 69.1ug/kg, Prometryn 26ug/kg, Simazine 14ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Riversdale Drive, Hoppers Crossing (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Prometryn

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Riversdale Drive opp Lindrum Outlook at Hoppers Crossing

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 3ug/kg, DEET 11ug/kg, Prometryn 28ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Woodlands Industrial Estate, Braeside (Victoria). Pesticide: DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Woodlands Industrial Estate; Braeside

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: DEET 17.6ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Winter Way, Point Cook (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron, Permethrin

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Winter Way; Point Cook

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 41.9ug/kg, DEET 9.6ug/kg, Diuron 32ug/kg, Permethrin 13.85ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Watervale Boulevard, Taylors Hill (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Watervale Blvd; Taylors Hill

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 22.4ug/kg, DEET 3.6ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Watergardens Shopping Centre, Taylors Lakes (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Watergardens Shopping Centre, Taylors Lakes

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 24.8ug/kg, DEET 8.4ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Valda Avenue, Mont Albert North (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Valda Ave, Mont Albert North

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 18.7ug/kg, DEET 9.9ug/kg, Diuron 17ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: St Muirs Drive, Warrandyte (Victoria). Pesticides: Multiple

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

St Muirs Drive, Warrandyte

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 171ug/kg, Chlorpyrifos 25.2ug/kg, DEET 3ug/kg, Diuron 56ug/kg, Permethrin 38ug/kg, Trifloxystrobin 16.4ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Old Joes Creek, Bayswater North (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, Diuron, Permethrin, Trifloxystrobin

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Old Joes Creek Rb, Bayswater North

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 70.4ug/kg, Diuron 11ug/kg, Permethrin 38ug/kg, Trifloxystrobin 12ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Brushy Creek Trail Wetlands, Chirnside Park (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Brushy Creek Trail Wetlands at Ramset Drive, Chirnside Park

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 22.3ug/kg, DEET 8.8ug/kg, Diuron 103ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Victor Crescent, Narre Warren (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, Diuron

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Narre Warren Township Rb at Victor Cres, Narre Warren

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 19.2ug/kg, Diuron 7ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Lysterfield West, Lysterfield (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron, Permethrin

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Lysterfield West Rb, Lysterfield

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 132ug/kg, DEET 10ug/kg, Diuron 53ug/kg, Permethrin 13.6ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Caroline Springs at Rockbank Middle Road (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, Pyrimethanil

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Caroline Springs at Rockbank Middle Rd, Caroline Springs

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 14.4ug/kg, Pyrimethanil 2.4ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: River Gum Creek Wetland, Hampton Park (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron, Prometryn

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

River Gum Creek wetland, opp Drysdale Ct; Hampton Park

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 42.8ug/kg, DEET 4ug/kg, Diuron 26ug/kg, Prometryn 30.8ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Hallam Road, Dandenong South (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron, Prometryn

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Hallam Valley Rb (Aust Post), Dandenong South

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 23.2ug/kg, DEET 3.6ug/kg, Diuron 12ug/kg, Prometryn 28.8ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Taylors Lakes at Watergardens (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, Pyrimethanil

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Taylors Lakes at Watergardens

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 8.4ug/kg, Pyrimethanil 2ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Cascade Wetlands, Linsell Boulevard, Clyde North (Victoria). Pesticide: Bifenthrin

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Cascade wetlands, Linsell Boulevard at Clyde North

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 7.6ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Yarrunga Reserve, Croydon Hills (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, Diuron

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Yarrunga Reserve, Croydon Hills

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 36ug/kg, Diuron 17ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Yarrabing Wetlands, Wantirna (Victoria). Pesticide: DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Yarrabing Wetlands, Wantirna

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: DEET 20ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Woodlands Park, Essendon (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Woodlands Park, Winifred St; Essendon

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 23.5ug/kg, DEET 9.6ug/kg, Diuron 10ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Wattle Park, Burwood (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Wattle Park, Burwood

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 4.8ug/kg, DEET 4.4ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Village Green Reserve, Nayook Lane, Maribyrnong (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron, Permethrin, Trifloxystrobin

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Village Green Reserve, Nayook Lane, Maribyrnong

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 25ug/kg, DEET 13ug/kg, Diuron 141ug/kg, Permethrin 34ug/kg, Trifloxystrobin 9.1ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Freshfields Drive, Cranbourne North (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Prometryn

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Freshfields Drive; Cranbourne North

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 6.4ug/kg, DEET 5.2ug/kg, Prometryn 34.7ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: The Esplanade, Narre Warren South (Victoria), Pesticides: Multiple

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

The Esplanade, Narrewarren South; Narre Warren South

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 20ug/kg, Boscalid 13.6ug/kg, DEET 8.8ug/kg, Diuron 9ug/kg, Fenamiphos 11ug/kg, Metolachlor 22.4ug/kg, Prometryn 24.8ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Equator Road, Thomastown (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

RB at end Equator Rd, Thomastown

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 5ug/kg, DEET 8ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Chocolate Lilly St at North Epping (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Chocolate Lilly St at North Epping

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 17ug/kg, DEET 25ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Settlers Orchard Greygum Terrace, Croydon Hills (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, Diuron

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Settlers Orchard at end of Greygum Tce; Croydon Hills

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 71.6ug/kg, Diuron 116ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Rowville Lakes, Rowville (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, Diuron, Trifloxystrobin

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Rowville Lakes – Hill Lake; Rowville

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 27.5ug/kg, Diuron 55.25ug/kg, Trifloxystrobin 68ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Ringwood Lake, Ringwood (Victoria). Pesticides: Multiple

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Ringwood Lake, Ringwood

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 13ug/kg, DEET 15ug/kg, Diuron 91ug/kg, Permethrin 32.8ug/kg, Prometryn 27ug/kg, Simazine 14ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: National Business Park, Link Drive, Campbellfield (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, Diuron, Permethrin

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

National Business Park at Link Drive; Campbellfield

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 36.8ug/kg, Diuron 10ug/kg, Permethrin 930.5ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: St. Clair Boulevard, Roxborough Park (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron, Metolachlor

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

St Clair Blvd, Roxborough Park

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 29.7ug/kg, DEET 12.5ug/kg, Diuron 8ug/kg, Metolachlor  22.3ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Paroo Avenue, Roxborough Park (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Paroo Ave, Roxborough Park

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 74ug/kg, DEET 2.8ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Roxborough Park @ McIntyre Ave (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Roxborough Park at Mc Intyre Ave

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 31.7ug/kg, DEET 11.9ug/kg, Diuron 9ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Orchard Grove Reserve, Blackburn South (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron, Prometryn, Pyrimethanil

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Orchard Grove Reserve at Fulton Rd, Blackburn South

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 25.85ug/kg, DEET 5.95ug/kg, Diuron 13.5ug/kg, Prometryn 13.05ug/kg, Pyrimethanil 2ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Newells Paddock Wetlands, Footscray (Victoria). Pesticides: DEET, Prometryn

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Newells Paddock Wetlands, Jamieson Ave; Footscray

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: DEET 14ug/kg, Prometryn 28ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Naganthan Way Pond, Croydon North (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron, Prometryn, Trifloxystrobin

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Naganthan Way Pond; Croydon North

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 22ug/kg, DEET 13ug/kg, Diuron 80ug/kg, Prometryn 26ug/kg, Trifloxystrobin 8.8ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Mt St. Joseph Wetlands, Altona (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Pyrimethanil

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Mt St Joseph Wetlands, Civic Parade; Altona

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 56.5ug/kg, DEET 2.3ug/kg, Pyrimethanil 2.4ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Monterey Bush Park, Ringwood (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Monterey Bush Park, Ringwood

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 78.8ug/kg, DEET 25.2ug/kg, Diuron 50ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Kingscote Way, North Epping (Victoria). Pesticides: DEET

 

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Kingscote Way, North Epping

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: DEET 21.2ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Millard Street, North Croydon (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Wetland at Millard St North Croydon

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 48ug/kg, DEET 14.7ug/kg, Diuron 9ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Larnoo Drive Upper, Doncaster East (Victoria). Pesticide: DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Larnoo Drive Upper; Doncaster East

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: DEET 7.2ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Landcox Park, Brighton East (Victoria). Pesticides: DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Landcox Park, Keys Ave; Brighton East

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: DEET 8.8ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Lakewood Nature Reserve, Knoxfield (Victoria). Pesticide: Pyrimethanil

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Lakewood Nature Reserve; Knoxfield

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Pyrimethanil 2ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Lakeview Grove, Wyndham Vale (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Lakeview Grove; Wyndham Vale

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 14.8ug/kg, DEET 10.4ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Kinterbury Drive Wetland, Kings Park (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, Diuron, Permethrin, Trifloxystrobin

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Kinterbury Drive wetland; Kings Park

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 97ug/kg, Diuron 162ug/kg, Permethrin  46.5ug/kg, Trifloxystrobin 49ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Kalparrin Gardens, Greensborough (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron, Permethrin

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Kalparrin Gardens at Yando St; Greensborough

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 70ug/kg, DEET 10ug/kg, Diuron 101ug/kg, Permethrin  27ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Mandalay Circuit, Beveridge (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Prometryn

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Mandalay Circuit, Beveridge

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 23ug/kg, DEET 10.3ug/kg, Prometryn  21.1ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Watson Street, Wallan (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Watson St at Wallan

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 8.8ug/kg, DEET 8ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Heritage Hills, Berwick Waters (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, Diuron, Prometryn

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Heritage Hills; Berwick Waters

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 24ug/kg, Diuron 10ug/kg, Prometryn 29.2ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Saltwater Coast Wetlands, Point Cook (Victoria). Pesticide: Bifenthrin

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Saltwater Coast Wetlands at Point Cook

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 132ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Greenslopes Reserve, Mooroolbark (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron, Permethrin, Trifloxystrobin

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Greenslopes Reserve Rb; Mooroolbark

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 144ug/kg, DEET 11ug/kg, Diuron 175ug/kg, Permethrin 13.85ug/kg, Trifloxystrobin 49ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Green Street Wetland Mooroolbark (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Green St wetland off Taylor Rd; Mooroolbark

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 21ug/kg, DEET 10ug/kg,

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Gilmour Park, Upper Ferntree Gully (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Gilmour Park Rb, Ferndale Rd; Upper Ferntree Gully

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 3.2ug/kg, DEET 9.6ug/kg,

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Epsom Estate, Hutchins Close, Mordialloc (Victoria). Pesticide: Diuron

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Epsom Estate, Hutchins Close; Mordialloc

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Diuron 126.25ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Elizabeth Bridge Reserve, Durham Road, Kilsyth (Victoria). Pesticides: DEET, Prometryn

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Elizabeth Bridge Reserve, Durham Rd; Kilsyth

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: DEET 2ug/kg, Prometryn 29.6ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Dundas Street Wetlands (Victoria). Pesticide: Prometryn

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Darebin Crk Forest Park Wetlands (Dundas St Wetlands), Thornbury

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Prometryn 26ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Sierra Avenue, Derrimut (Victoria). Pesticide: DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Sierra Ave at Derrimut; Sunshine West

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: DEET 5.2ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Cheltenham Road, Dandenong South (Victoria). Pesticide: Bifenthrin, Diuron, Permethrin

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Cheltenham Rd Rb, U/S Chelt Rd; Dandenong South

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 37.2ug/kg, Diuron 22ug/kg, Permethrin 39.4ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Chandler Road, Keysborough (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, Diuron, Permethrin, Pyrimethanil

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Chandler Rd Rb, Chandler Rd; Keysborough

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 68.4ug/kg, Diuron 20ug/kg, Permethrin 209ug/kg, Pyrimethanil 7.6ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Caroline Springs Estate (Victoria). Pesticide: Pyrimethanil

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Caroline Springs Estate at King Circuit; Caroline Springs

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Pyrimethanil 2ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Botanica Boulevard Bundoora (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Botanica Blvd opp Pride Ave (North Pond), Bundoora

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 111ug/kg, DEET 33ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015 April: Bonview Wetlands, Doncaster (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, Diuron, Pyrimethanil

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Bonview Wetlands opp Martin Ct; Doncaster (above Ruffey Lake)

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 37.4ug/kg, Diuron 343ug/kg, Pyrimethanil 6.8ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Cyril Molyneux Reserve, Berwick (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, Prometryn

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Berwick West Rb at Cyril Molyneux Reserve; Berwick

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 47.6ug/kg, Prometryn 29.2ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Tim Neville Arboretum, Ferntree Gully (Victoria). Pesticide: DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Tim Neville Arboretum, Dorset Road; Ferntree Gully

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: DEET 9.2ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Bellbird Dell Reserve , Vermont South (Victoria). Pesticide: Diuron

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Bellbird Dell Reserve, South Edge Pk, Vermont South

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Diuron 31ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Belgrave Lake (Victoria). Pesticides: DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Belgrave Lake at Judkins Ave ;Belgrave

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: DEET 42ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Albert Park Lake (Victoria). Pesticides: DEET, Diuron

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Albert Park Lake

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: DEET 7.6ug/kg, Diuron 70ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Amber Place Wetland, Wyndham Vale (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Amber Place wetland; Wyndham Vale

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 6.4ug/kg, DEET 6.4ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Alan Morton Reserve Park Orchards (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron, Prometryn

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Alan Morton Reserve at Park Rd, Park Orchards

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 23ug/kg, DEET 23.4ug/kg,  Diuron 5316ug/kg, Prometryn 21.4ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Craigmore Avenue Mentone (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, Diuron, Permethrin

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Southern Road retarding basin at Craigmore Ave; Mentone

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 126ug/kg, Diuron 17ug/kg, Permethrin 84.5ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2018 February: Concerns over Mosquito Spraying with Twilight ULV on Karumba Fishery (Queensland). Pesticide: Phenothrin, Piperonyl Butoxide

Mosquito-control spraying questioned after Gulf barramundi fail to spawn for two years

Feb 5 2018

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-02-05/mosquito-control-spraying-questioned-after-fish-fail-to-spawn/9390214

A remote Queensland Gulf community is concerned their local council’s mosquito control program could destroy the local barramundi industry after the hatchery failed to produce spawn for almost two years.

Spraying to stem mosquito numbers and mosquito-borne viruses such as dengue and zika are carried-out worldwide, and recently in Townsville, Rockhampton and Torres Strait islands.

According to the Carpentaria Shire Council, the barramundi hatchery at Karumba had not produced successful spawn since at least April 2016 until recently, when mosquito spraying was halted for two months.

Local fisherman Mathew Donald is among those concerned about the impacts of mosquito spraying on the fishing and tourism industries across north Queensland.

“If the hatcheries stopped stocking the rivers and the fisherman kept fishing the way they were, then the barramundi stocks would obviously just decline,” he said.

“The professional fishermen would have to move on, the tourists would stop coming to Karumba because of the lack of barramundi there. It would just destroy the place.”

Environmental concerns

Carpentaria Shire Mayor Jack Bawden told the ABC there were two successful spawns around the time the spraying was stopped, which prompted council to further investigate the effects of mosquito spraying.

“Whether that is a 100 per cent reason for it we still don’t know for sure. That’s why there’s more investigations happening,” he said.

Mr Bawden said the Council suspended mosquito spraying two weeks ago and have called in an environmental health officer for advice.

He said he only became aware of the issues just recently and it was an issue the present council inherited from the previous administration.

“I’ve decided looking into it myself. You’re actually told not to use it [spray] around aquaculture and environments like that because it’s detrimental to marine life,” he said.

Despite the council’s efforts, local fishermen are worried the impact goes beyond the local hatchery.

The chair of the Gulf of Carpentaria Commercial Fishermen’s Association, Shane Ward, said he was concerned about the impact on the hatchery and environment.

“Their suspicion why the last couple of spawns haven’t worked is because of the mosquito spraying and they can’t prove otherwise, so we’re a bit concerned that spraying could also impact the habitat around Karumba,” Mr Ward said.

“The local environment is what we’re concerned about because Karumba is built right on the wetlands, with mangroves almost right up to the back of some of the houses.”

The Council used a chemical called Twilight ULV Mosquito Adulticide Concentrate to manage mosquitos, which according to the material safety data sheet published on their website poses many ecological risks.

“This product is toxic to bees. Very toxic to aquatic organisms, may cause long-term adverse effects to the aquatic environment,” the document said.

While fishermen were comforted by the recent spraying suspension, some believed the council did not act quickly enough.

“That’s quite disgusting that they would keep spraying something like that around Karumba when fishing is the only reason for Karumba,” Mr Donald said.

“They should’ve been on to that a hell of a lot earlier.”

Mayor Bawden said he assured the community the Council was working to resolve the issue.

“Be patient. We’re trying to do the right thing by everyone, and at the same time get a sustainable fishery going in Karumba,” he said.

2015: Lake Legana, Patterson Lakes (Victoria). Pesticides: Permethrin, Pyrimethanil

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Lake Legana at Iluka Island; Patterson Lakes

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Permethrin 13.7ug/kg, Pyrimethanil 8.4ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Hendersons Creek Wetland, South Morang (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Hendersons Creek Wetland at cnr of Findon Rd and the Lakes Blvd; South Morang

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin Trace, DEET 8.4ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Austrak RB at Regional Drive, Somerton (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Austrak RB at Regional Drv, Somerton

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 8.4ug/kg, DEET 9.2ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Bungalook Creek Bayswater North (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron, Fenamiphos, Pyrimethanil

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Bungalook Creek RB at Canterbury Rd; Bayswater North

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 42.4ug/kg, DEET 4ug/kg, Diuron 59ug/kg, Fenamiphos 50.4ug/kg, Pyrimethanil 2ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Avoca Street Highett (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, Diuron, Permethrin, Simazine

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Avoca St Retarding Basin at Avoca St; Highett

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 32.4ug/kg, Diuron 7ug/kg, Permethrin 41.65ug/kg, Simazine 16ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Pezzimenti Place Wonga Park (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Pezzimenti Place at Wonga Park

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 10ug/kg, DEET 13ug/kg, Diuron 69ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2015: Croydon Main Drain (Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, DEET, Diuron, Fenamiphos, Permethrin

Potentially toxic concentrations of synthetic pyrethroids associated with low density residential land use

Supplementary Material

Stephen Marshall*, David Sharley, Katherine Jeppe, Simon Sharp, Gavin Rose, Vincent Pettigrove

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fenvs.2016.00075/full

Croydon Main Drain at footbridge near 4 Jesmond Rd; Croydon

Sediment

Feb/April 2015: Bifenthrin 65.2ug/kg, DEET 6ug/kg, Diuron 17ug/kg, Fenamiphos 47.2ug/kg, Permethrin 16ug/kg

also see: https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-common-insecticide-poisoning-our-rivers-and-wetlands

2019 August: 89 dead eagles Violet Town (Victoria). Suspected Pesticide Luci-Jet (Fenthion)

Eagle death toll hits 89: Investigators test for poison at Violet Town

https://www.weeklytimesnow.com.au/news/victoria/eagle-death-toll-hits-89-investigators-test-for-poison-at-violet-town/news-story/550e7afbd251b748b92221b5fc9a3533

Sep 3 2019

THE death toll from the suspected poisoning of Wedge-tailed eagles on a property north of Violet Town has risen to 89, following the discovery of 13 more carcasses.

Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning officers are investigating if the deaths are deliberate, including the possible use of poison.

A warrant was issued early last week, allowing Victoria Police and DELWP investigators to search the sheep and cattle property’s home and buildings for further evidence.

Samples of the dead eagles have been sent off for testing.

The deaths follow last year’s discovery of the carcasses of more than 400 Wedge-tailed eagles on an East Gippsland property at Tubbut, which were poisoned during the previous two-and-a-half years.

The suspected poison in the Gippsland case was the now banned sheep dip Luci-Jet.

Luci-jet is highly toxic to birds, with CSIRO research from 1985 stating “seven species of birds in Australia are highly sensitive to the organophosphorous insecticide”, including Wedge-tailed eagles.

Poisoned birds lose their ability to stand or fly, before convulsing and dying.

Native birds are protected under the Wildlife Act 1975 and the penalty for deliberately injuring or killing wildlife ranges from $8,261 to $39,652 and/or six to 24 months’ imprisonment.

If you have any information regarding this incident contact DELWP on 136 186 or Crime Stoppers Victoria: 1800 333 000 or crimestoppersvic.com.au/report-a-crime

Vic bird deaths blamed on insecticide

Oct 7 2019

https://www.theleader.com.au/story/6424261/vic-bird-deaths-blamed-on-insecticide/?cs=9397

An insecticide is believed to have killed almost 200 native birds in northeast Victoria.

Dead wedge-tailed eagles found near Violet Town in August, led the state’s environment department to find more, along with hawks and falcons, on a nearby property.

They have since found up to 200 dead native birds in the area, including 25 wedge-tailed eagles.

Tests of six eagles have detected an insecticide used to control mites.

The same agricultural chemical has been found in the carcasses of animals suspected of being used as bait, with the department believing it may have caused all of the bird deaths.

But they aren’t sure whether the poisoning was an accident.

“It remains unclear if these birds were deliberately poisoned, however given the large number of birds found nearby, it’s a possibility,” environment department compliance manager Andrew Dean said.

Raids have also taken place in recent weeks at properties in Shepparton East and Goomalibee.

“All evidence collected will be forensically analysed, including the carcasses and chemicals seized, which may take some time.”

2019 April: Port of Portland Log Fumigation (Victoria) – Methyl Bromide

Port moves to allay fumigation fears

Port moves to allay fumigation fears

PORT of Portland chief executive officer Jim Cooper has moved to allay public concerns about the use of the chemical methyl bromide to fumigate a log ship bound for China.
The public concerns were made to the Glenelg Shire Council.
A spokesperson for the council said that “the concerns related to the use of methyl bromide, and the prevailing wind direction on Wednesday morning”.
“The council did receive calls from members of the public last year and earlier this year about the chemical,” the spokesperson said.
“We will make enquiries as to what the regulatory uses of the chemical are.”

2019 August: Epping Market (Victoria) – Methyl Bromide

Ozone, uh oh: Fumigator roasted for spraying pesticide at fruit market

https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/ozone-uh-oh-fumigator-roasted-for-spraying-pesticide-at-fruit-market-20190802-p52dan.html

August 3 2019

A fumigation company at Melbourne’s fruit and vegetable wholesale market has been ordered to stop releasing a gas it sprays to deter pests because it depletes the ozone layer.

It’s the first time the Environment Protection Authority has issued a pollution abatement notice for methyl bromide, a colourless and odourless gas often used to control insects, spiders, mites, snails and rodents.

Madiklumi Pty Ltd – the company whacked with the clean-up edict at the Epping markets – challenged the decision. However, it was recently upheld in the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal.

The environment watchdog used powers that stem from the United Nations Montreal Protocol, an international agreement first signed in 1989 to prevent the hole in the ozone layer from getting bigger.

Methyl bromide has been banned in Australia for all but certified quarantine and feedstock uses since 2005.

Sitting in the stratosphere between 15 and 35 kilometres above earth, the ozone layer filters out harmful ultraviolet light that causes skin cancer, agricultural disasters and other damage. The Montreal Protocol is credited with reversing its degradation.

After receiving a tip-off, the EPA discovered in late 2017 that Robinson’s Unloading, a logistics company connected to Madiklumi, was releasing diluted methyl bromide into the atmosphere after it had finished fumigating.

Under the VCAT order, Madiklumi was given until next February to stop. The company will also be required to provide regular reports on its compliance.

The tribunal heard that the most effective way to prevent the release of methyl bromide was to recapture it and then bury it in landfill.

Lawyers for Madiklumi argued that this would have a significant financial impact on the fumigation company, starting with a capital outlay of between $70,000-$100,000.

However, VCAT senior member Geoffrey Code and member Catherine Wilson rejected the argument, pointing out that other fumigators were able to continue operating while capturing methyl bromide.

The EPA’s CEO, Dr Cathy Wilkinson, praised the tribunal for sending “a clear message” to businesses that protection of the environment was more important than financial considerations.

“Methyl bromide is a necessary evil for many fresh produce operators, but that doesn’t mean we should abandon all environmental considerations, especially when there are viable options available for reducing its impact,” she said.

Russell Kennedy principal Stefan Fiedler said Madiklumi was disappointed with the tribunal’s decision.

“Madiklumi estimates the requirement will increase the cost of fumigation for consignment of fresh produce for distribution predominantly to the interstate domestic market and also overseas,” he said.

Mr Fiedler said the company would work to comply with the decision. It was important that other fumigators had the same standard imposed on them to prevent “market distortion”, he said.

“Madiklumi will continue its work alongside leading industry partners in pursuit of alternative technology avoiding the future use of methyl bromide,” he said.

EPA senior air quality scientist Dr Paul Torre said methyl bromide was a popular method of pest control because it was fast-acting and could be applied across large surfaces.

“But there’s the other side,” he said.

“There are these environmental impacts and that’s why they have been trying to phase this out for a number of years. It’s about finding an alternative.”

2019 March: Mosquito Spraying Burili Ulcer (Goyarra Street, Rye). Pesticides: Bifenthrin?, S Methoprene?

Goyarra Street Rye

Department Health and Human Services Letter to Residents

Mosquito Control Activities Scheduled March 19 – No ‘Opt-out’ offered to residents

Spraying can be conducted in several ways but is most commonly applied by hand using a hose that is connected to either a backpack or a container in a vehicle.

Information from Friends of the Earth

Bifenthrin Insecticide – Used against a variety of insects including termites. Most likely enters waterways as a result of termite treatment.

Pesticide Movement Rating: Extremely Low. Soil Half Life: 26 days. Water Solubility: 0.1. Koc: 240000. (The lower the Koc, the less sorption potential and the higher risk of it washing off a site).

Human Health: Possible carcinogen, developmental/reproductive toxin, suspected
endocrine disruptor.

Ecological Information: Very highly toxic to fish, insects and zooplankton.

Beating Burili Project in Victoria Project

https://www2.health.vic.gov.au/public-health/infectious-diseases/beating-buruli

  • Cases of Buruli ulcer have increased significantly in Victoria in recent years and the disease is spreading into new geographical areas.
  • Although it’s understood that the infection is picked up from the environment, it’s not yet known exactly how humans become infected with the bacteria, or where in the environment the bacteria prefer to live. It is not spread person-to-person.
  • Research has shown that possums and mosquitoes may be involved in spreading the disease, however there may be other or multiple ways the disease is spread.
  • A two-year research project is currently underway through a collaborative partnership between DHHS, the Doherty Institute, Barwon Health, Austin Health, CSIRO, Agriculture Victoria, the University of Melbourne and Mornington Peninsula Shire, to better understand how Buruli ulcer is transmitted and determine effective ways to prevent infections and reduce infections.
  • The ‘Beating Buruli in Victoria’ project hopes to actively disrupt disease transmission for the first time and lead to the development of evidence-based policies and guidelines that can help stop the spread of Buruli ulcer around Victoria and even globally.

2019 March: Mosquito Spraying Burili Ulcer (French Street, Rye, Victoria). Pesticide: Bifenthrin?, S Methoprene?

French Street Rye

Department Health and Human Services Letter to Residents

Mosquito Control Activities Scheduled March 2019 – No ‘Opt-out’ offered to residents

Spraying can be conducted in several ways but is most commonly applied by hand using a hose that is connected to either a backpack or a container in a vehicle.

Information from Friends of the Earth

Bifenthrin Insecticide – Used against a variety of insects including termites. Most likely enters waterways as a result of termite treatment.

Pesticide Movement Rating: Extremely Low. Soil Half Life: 26 days. Water Solubility: 0.1. Koc: 240000. (The lower the Koc, the less sorption potential and the higher risk of it washing off a site).

Human Health: Possible carcinogen, developmental/reproductive toxin, suspected
endocrine disruptor.

Ecological Information: Very highly toxic to fish, insects and zooplankton.

Beating Burili Project in Victoria Project

https://www2.health.vic.gov.au/public-health/infectious-diseases/beating-buruli

  • Cases of Buruli ulcer have increased significantly in Victoria in recent years and the disease is spreading into new geographical areas.
  • Although it’s understood that the infection is picked up from the environment, it’s not yet known exactly how humans become infected with the bacteria, or where in the environment the bacteria prefer to live. It is not spread person-to-person.
  • Research has shown that possums and mosquitoes may be involved in spreading the disease, however there may be other or multiple ways the disease is spread.
  • A two-year research project is currently underway through a collaborative partnership between DHHS, the Doherty Institute, Barwon Health, Austin Health, CSIRO, Agriculture Victoria, the University of Melbourne and Mornington Peninsula Shire, to better understand how Buruli ulcer is transmitted and determine effective ways to prevent infections and reduce infections.
  • The ‘Beating Buruli in Victoria’ project hopes to actively disrupt disease transmission for the first time and lead to the development of evidence-based policies and guidelines that can help stop the spread of Buruli ulcer around Victoria and even globally.

2019 March: Mosquito Spraying Burili Ulcer (Dawn Street, Rye, Victoria). Pesticides: Bifenthrin?, S Methoprene?

Dawn Street Rye

Department Health and Human Services Letter to Residents

Mosquito Control Activities Scheduled March 19 – No ‘Opt-out’ offered to residents

Spraying can be conducted in several ways but is most commonly applied by hand using a hose that is connected to either a backpack or a container in a vehicle.

Information from Friends of the Earth

Bifenthrin Insecticide – Used against a variety of insects including termites. Most likely enters waterways as a result of termite treatment.

Pesticide Movement Rating: Extremely Low. Soil Half Life: 26 days. Water Solubility: 0.1. Koc: 240000. (The lower the Koc, the less sorption potential and the higher risk of it washing off a site).

Human Health: Possible carcinogen, developmental/reproductive toxin, suspected
endocrine disruptor.

Ecological Information: Very highly toxic to fish, insects and zooplankton.

Beating Burili Project in Victoria Project

https://www2.health.vic.gov.au/public-health/infectious-diseases/beating-buruli

  • Cases of Buruli ulcer have increased significantly in Victoria in recent years and the disease is spreading into new geographical areas.
  • Although it’s understood that the infection is picked up from the environment, it’s not yet known exactly how humans become infected with the bacteria, or where in the environment the bacteria prefer to live. It is not spread person-to-person.
  • Research has shown that possums and mosquitoes may be involved in spreading the disease, however there may be other or multiple ways the disease is spread.
  • A two-year research project is currently underway through a collaborative partnership between DHHS, the Doherty Institute, Barwon Health, Austin Health, CSIRO, Agriculture Victoria, the University of Melbourne and Mornington Peninsula Shire, to better understand how Buruli ulcer is transmitted and determine effective ways to prevent infections and reduce infections.
  • The ‘Beating Buruli in Victoria’ project hopes to actively disrupt disease transmission for the first time and lead to the development of evidence-based policies and guidelines that can help stop the spread of Buruli ulcer around Victoria and even globally.

 

2019 August: Mosquito Spray Trial Halted (Mornington Peninsula, Victoria). Pesticide: Bifenthrin

Buruli ulcer mosquito spray trial halted amid pesticide, bee concerns

https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/buruli-ulcer-mosquito-spray-trial-halted-amid-pesticide-bee-concerns-20190814-p52h59.html

August 14 2019

A controversial plan to spray pesticide over parts of the Mornington Peninsula to fight the spread of the flesh-eating Buruli ulcer has been halted amid concerns about its effect on bees.

The pesticide trial, which was planned for October, was designed to reduce mosquito numbers in the hope that would stop the spread of the mysterious ulcer, which has mainly affected the Mornington and Bellarine peninsulas.

But the trial has been paused by the Mornington Shire Council after local residents expressed concerns about the use of synthetic pyrethroid pesticide spray.

In a petition, the founder of Save the Bees Australia, Simon Mulvany, dubbed the proposed spraying an “insect massacre”.

“The stuff they are using will kill every insect,” Mr Mulvany said. “There is also health warnings about using it near waterways because it will also kill aqua creatures including dragonfly larvae and tadpoles.”

Mr Mulvany started the petition opposing the mosquito cull after reading about the proposed spraying in The Good Weekend. The petition has been signed by 16,000 people.

“What danger does this poisoning program pose to pollinators, fauna and public health?” the petition says.

Mornington Peninsula Shire mayor David Gill said the community does not want the spraying “and have made that clear”.

“We are not going to have spraying on the Mornington Peninsula in October – they can come back to us and have another discussion,” he said.

There have been 135 cases of the flesh-eating Buruli ulcer recorded in Victoria this year, slightly down on the 165 cases at the same time last year.

Leading Buruli expert Professor Tim Stinear said research led by Melbourne scientists over the last 15 years indicated mosquitoes and possums were involved in the spread of the disease.

“When we have a disease outbreak we have an obligation to the human population to control that disease,” said Professor Stinear, a professor in microbiology at Melbourne University’s Doherty Institute.

“What we are trying to do is balance the need to control a devastating disease with minimising environmental impacts.”

He said those involved in the study were very sensitive to the environmental impacts and would continue with the consultation process.

“We are in a close partnership with Mornington Shire Council and we are certainly going to listen  to their wishes and advice,” Professor Stinear said.

He said there were alternatives to pesticide spraying, but the effectiveness of other interventions might be varied.

“It is too early to say what the alternatives might look like but they are certainly being investigated. We need to control this disease.”

The council voted to undertake extensive community consultation on the use of spraying and ask for expert advice on alternative approaches that alleviated harm to the ecosystem and biodiversity.

It would not take a position on the spraying trials – which are part of the Beating Buruli in Victoria project – until this was completed.

The council has asked for a report stipulating that fogging, where pesticide is misted from a blower, is not a viable option and that targeted spraying in yards should be a last resort.

It says safer, non-chemical pesticides should be explored.

It also says anyone affected by the mosquito cull program should be required to opt in, rather than opt out.

Cr Gill said there was an outpouring of concern at a public meeting attended by hundreds of people last Saturday.

“To a person, there was nobody supporting spraying,” said Cr Gill, who is a native bee enthusiast.

The Beating Buruli study is being funded by the Australian government, which has provided $3.9 million for Buruli research.

It is a joint initiative between the Department of Health and Human Services, Mornington Peninsula Shire Council, Austin Health, Agriculture Victoria and Melbourne University’s Doherty Institute.

Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt, who attended the public meeting on Saturday, said the Shire maintained full authority over the project and actions undertaken in its municipality.

“My advice to the meeting and the council is that they may want to consider moving to an opt-in program,” Mr Hunt said.

“It was also good to speak to locals about how to better educate physicians and diagnosticians on the ulcer.”

2016 March: Tens of Thousands of Dead Bees (Killarney Victoria). Pesticide: Fipronil

Insecticide devastates beehives

March 14 2016

https://www.standard.net.au/story/3790222/bees-buzz-no-more-after-chemical-hit/

CHELSEA Fox and her family love honey and have four beehives on their Killarney property.

She knows that local farmers need to control crickets and locusts but wishes they could use alternatives to the insecticide that recently killed tens of thousands of bees from her hives.

Ms Fox said she first noticed hundreds of dead bees on March 3 around a hive they had commandeered in a shed behind her home.

She later found thousands more mortalities around three other hives she keeps along the fenceline of the family’s rural property and thousands more died in the ensuing days.

“I was devastated to find out that the cause of the death of my bees was due to agricultural spray that is used to control locust and crickets.

“The key ingredient is fipronil and it is highly toxic to bees and a range of other insects and fish.

“A lot of farmers I know choose not to use it and make responsible choices with their chemical use,” Ms Fox said.

“The death caused by this chemical is very slow.

“Each day I have been sweeping up thousands of new dead bees and it’s quite heartbreaking for our whole family to see all our hives slowly dying,” she said.

Ms Fox said it was difficult to determine where the chemical was sprayed because bees foraged for up to a 10 kilometre radius. She said she did not want to assign blame to anyone over the deaths.

However she had gone public with the incident in the hope it would raise awareness about the harmful non-target effects of the insecticide. She is also sending a letter to farmers near her property alerting them to the effects of fipronil on bees.

Government specialists in agricultural chemicals have told her there were a range of options available to farmers to control locusts and crickets that did not affect bees.

“If this type of devastation has happened to my four hives, imagine what it’s doing to bees on a wider scale,” Ms Fox said.

“We all know that bees are essential for pollinating agricultural crops as well as most of out fruits and vegetables that we eat,” she said.

2018 April: Busselton Bee Deaths (Western Australia)

Bee deaths investigated

https://thewest.com.au/news/busselton-dunsborough-times/bee-deaths-investigated-ng-b88796601z

5 April 2019

Bee colonies in Busselton and Vasse have been dying and while experts have not yet confirmed the cause and extent, apiarists are pointing to insecticide.

Beekeepers first noticed colonies dying about a month ago and the Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development confirmed it has since received several reports.

The issue appears to be concentrated in West Busselton and Vasse but beekeeper Catherine Talbot conceded it was difficult to track given bees’ foraging habits.

“One of my hives is next door and they’re all dead but the two in my backyard are fine,” she said.

“I know of another in Vasse whose hives are fine and a friend of mine … knows of six (that aren’t).

“It all depends on where the bees are going.”

The Times understands bee deaths from insecticides are not uncommon but Ms Talbot and fellow beekeeper Andrew Weinert said it was the first time they had experienced it locally.

Mr Weinert lost two not-well-established hives and said the remaining bees were still dying.

“There is no easy way to pin point the source of the insecticide as bees will fly up to 5km in any direction,” he said.

Some apiarists queried whether routine spraying by the City of Busselton could be responsible but acting chief executive Paul Needham said the same products had now been used for several years.

“Minor spraying on an ongoing basis is undertaken across the broad area by our parks and gardening crew,” he said.

“The product has been used for many years across the municipality in generally mild doses and we do not believe it would adversely impact bee populations.”

DPIRB is making further inquiries into the reports and said if apiarists suspected insecticide as the cause of bee deaths, they could organise laboratory testing of honey or wax and unusual behaviour or death should be reported.

Renee Hall, who recently started keeping bees with the help of Ms Talbot, said it was distressing to watch the bees die and believed it to be indicative of “the bigger picture”.

“My husband’s been out there sweeping up the poor, disoriented bees — it’s really sad,” she said.

“And it’s got me thinking about what we put onto our food. I make strawberry jam and I think about all the pesticides that go onto strawberries — we eat that stuff.”

Ms Talbot likened the situation to “the canary in the coal mine”.

“It raises awareness about how many toxic elements are in the environment,” she said.

“If bees in your backyard are dying … it makes you wonder what else is going on out there.”

2012 June: Thousands of Bees Killed – Batemans Bay region (NSW)

Thousands of bees killed as 750 hives poisoned

https://www.smh.com.au/environment/conservation/thousands-of-bees-killed-as-750-hives-poisoned-20120619-20l4z.html

June 19 2012

Hundreds of beehives on the NSW south coast have been sprayed with poison, with a major honey producer left devastated and a harvest ruined.

Police said about 750 beehives were poisoned on properties near Batemans Bay causing about $150,000 worth of damage.

Wendy Roberts from Australian Rainforest Honey at Sunshine Bay, which provides honey to Woolworths around the country, said about 240 of their 5000 hives had been sprayed, killing all the bees inside.

Mrs Roberts said her husband Pat discovered the poisoned hives at two of their sites yesterday morning.

The honey on some of the hives was ready to be harvested this week, but is now contaminated.

2019 June: 10 million bees killed – Griffith (NSW). Pesticide: Fipronil

No more buzz: Griffith apiarists want to see chemical banned from use in Australia after major bee poisoning

https://www.beaudeserttimes.com.au/story/6218101/insecticide-blamed-for-death-of-10-million-bees/

June 14 2019:

The use of a toxic chemical has left 10 million bees in Griffith dead.

Five local apiarists have seen around 340 hives between them destroyed by the use of Fipronil, and they’re now calling for the insecticide to be banned in Australia.

The chemical is banned in around 49 countries including most of Europe.

Apiarist Les Ellis lost 75 hives alone to Fipronil contamination.

“It’s overkill, it’s too toxic,” Mr Ellis said.

The chemical has a 120 day half-life which means a drop on a flower can be brought back to a bee hive and can have devastating consequences

Mr Ellis said the inside of hives including wax and honey would either have to be burned or buried and cannot be re-used without endangering new bees.

Mr Ellis said the loss of his 75 hives effectively means he will retire for the second time in his life.

“It would take two years to replace 75 hives, that’s two years without income,” he said.

Fipronil is often used to combat termites or ants and only needs a few drops to be brought back to a hive or nest to be effective.

What’s not clear to the apiarists however, is how 340 hives were contaminated.

One theory is a wild bee hive was sprayed and the then unprotected honey was taken back to the apiarists hives.

While the chemical has been used to protect crops, the apiarists believed when the hives were moved to ‘safer’ locations closer to Griffith they would have been protected from contamination.

“Twenty years ago people wouldn’t care less about bees, now there’s a real buzz about bees because people understand the role they play,” Ian Carter said.

“We don’t know why this chemical is being used in town.”

Mr Carter had his bees in two locations to shield them from insecticides however many of those hives have since been destroyed.

Laboratory testing revealed the bees which had died were poisoned by fipronil which is toxic to humans if ingested in large amounts.

Apiarist Tom Doubleday said he believed the use fipronil around Griffith was contrary to the directions.

“There’s other chemicals which will do the job, they’re less toxic but more costly,” Mr Doubleday said.

2017 March: Coffs Harbour Blueberry Spraying (NSW). Bees and Methomyl

‘Nothing untoward’ with chemical spraying on blueberry farms

https://www.coffscoastadvocate.com.au/news/nothing-untoward-with-chemical-spraying-on-blueber/3154125/

13 March 2017

DISCUSSION on radio this morning posed questions whether Coffs Coast blueberry farmers are spraying their crops at night due to public safety issues and the concoction of poisonous chemicals they are spraying?

After hearing the discussion on radio this morning, Southern Cross Honey and Pollination, which supplies 400 bee hives to local blueberry farmers supplying the Oz Berries Group, contacted The Advocate to shed light on the situation.

A company spokesman said blueberry farmers are spraying their crops between dusk and midnight so insecticide residue has dried by morning when bees from the supplied hives are active pollinating the crops.

“The farmers are spraying of a night-time to look after our bees really,” a company spokesman said.

“Farmers cannot spray in the middle of the day because it burns the leaves of the blueberry plants.

“The days of spraying nasty chemicals around are gone.

“There is nothing untoward going on at the blueberry farms I supply my bees too, just because they are seen to be spraying their crops of a night-time.

The company spokesman said most local blueberry farmers are rotating the insecticides known as ‘Prodigy’, which controls moths, caterpillars, heliothis, and bug varieties, and ‘Success’, which controls moths, butterflies, caterpillars, grubs, slugs and thrips, to ensure problem insects don’t build up resistance to one particular brand of spray.

“These chemicals clear within a day or so, I believe, but if the farmers are using another insecticide known as Lannate than that’s a worry,” the beekeeper said.

“It’s like letting off a nuclear bomb for all insects including bees.”

Another concern raised by neighbours living near local blueberry farms is spray drift onto their properties.

The local beekeeper said given the cost of the chemicals blueberry farmers aren’t going to waste their chemicals by spraying in windy conditions.

“They want the best coverage they can get. A chemical like Prodigy retails for $1500 a litre, they sure aren’t going to be wasting it over their neighbours’ fences.”

“After hearing the discussion on radio I just thought I would ring in and clear up a bit of information for the general public as to why farmers are spraying of a night-time.

“If a farmer is spraying between 3am and 9am personally they won’t be having my bees on their property. There’s no way the chemical will have cleared by the time the bees are active of a morning.

“Put it this way without bees there are no blueberries, no fruit and there’s no profit.”

Southern Cross Honey and Pollination supplies two species of bees to local farms for crop pollination, Italian bees (yellow banded bees) and caucasian bees (known for their black appearance).

 

2016: Western Treatment Plant Biosolids (Victoria). Pesticides: Aldrin, Chlordane (trans), DDD, DDE, Dieldrin, Heptachlor, Hexachlorobenzene

March 2016 – Biosolids/ Sludge Data Summary (Melbourne Water)

The following data was collected from Melbourne Water’s Eastern and Western Treatments Plants over many years. Various compounds and parameters were tested over this time but those of most interest to the EPA and the public are shown here. This data should be used to give an indication of the average concentrations of pollutants in biosolids and sludge and how these may change as the material changes from fresh to old. Old biosolids are classified as being older than 3 years at the time of testing. All tests were conducted on dried biosolids by NATA accredited laboratories.

Western Treatment Plant Biosolids (Maximum Detections)

Aldrin: 0.3mg/kg

Chlordane (trans): 0.02mg/kg

DDD: 0.29mg/kg

DDE: 0.1mg/kg

Dieldrin: 0.21mg/kg

Heptachlor: 0.03mg/kg

Hexachlorobenzene: 0.012mg/kg

PCB’s: 5.98mg/kg

2016: Eastern Treatment Plant Biosolids (Victoria). Pesticides: Aldrin, Chlordane (cis), Chlordane (trans), DDT, DDE, DDD, Dieldrin, Hexachlorobenzene

March 2016 – Biosolids/ Sludge Data Summary (Melbourne Water)

The following data was collected from Melbourne Water’s Eastern and Western Treatments Plants over many years. Various compounds and parameters were tested over this time but those of most interest to the EPA and the public are shown here. This data should be used to give an indication of the average concentrations of pollutants in biosolids and sludge and how these may change as the material changes from fresh to old. Old biosolids are classified as being older than 3 years at the time of testing. All tests were conducted on dried biosolids by NATA accredited laboratories.

Eastern Treatment Plant Biosolids (Maximum Detections)

Aldrin: 0.24mg/kg

Chlordane (cis): 0.031mg/kg

Chlordane (trans): 0.1mg/kg

DDD: 0.089mg/kg

DDE: 0.066mg/kg

DDT: 0.76mg/kg

Dieldrin: 0.12mg/kg

Hexachlorobenzene: 0.049mg/kg

PCB’s: 0.18mg/kg

2019 April: St George community forum addresses issue of spray drift (Queensland)

St George community forum addresses issue of spray drift

19 April 2019

https://www.queenslandcountrylife.com.au/story/6080070/st-george-landholders-tackling-spray-drift/?cs=4717

Continued incidents of spray drift nation-wide and an estimated damage bill of $1 million to local vineyards have seen St George landholders come together to tackle the issue at a local level.

A group of almost 50 cotton, horticulture and grain growers, as well as industry and regulatory representatives, gathered earlier this month to discuss regulations, education and how best to tackle the issue.

CottonInfo extension officer Andrew McKay said other than discussions around regulations with representatives from APVMA, EPA NSW, and Biosecurity Queensland, the other significant presentation was from Brett Mawbey of SOS Macquarie.

“SOS Macquarie is a group that is already established in the Macquarie Valley in NSW, and they’re doing what we’re hoping to achieve which is basically educating spray applicators and chemical users, raising their awareness of the issues and perhaps trying to go about how to do it better,” he said.

Mr McKay said they hoped to establish a working group in the local area.

“Hopefully the group can get involved in helping to deliver an education piece around how to set up sprayers properly, and get expert input into doing that and working collaboratively with the regulators,” he said.

Spray drift, which hit most vineyards in the St George region in mid- to late-September, left an estimated damage bill of $1 million as a result of yield losses and extra picking costs.

Riversands Vineyards owner David Blacket said he had hoped vines would grow out of early leaf damage but losses became apparent in early November.

Growers say it is unclear yet if the vines will also be affected next season.

2018 Jan: Coonamble (NSW). Spray Drift. Paraquat mentioned

16 Jan 2018

Coonamble farmer John Single speaks out on spray drift

https://www.farmonline.com.au/story/5169349/farmer-says-current-spray-drift-just-the-tip-of-the-iceberg/

Following the spate of news regarding the alleged spray drift in the Walgett shire and beyond, Coonamble farmer, John Single says growers need to step up when it comes to spray drift. 

The recent publicity surrounding herbicide damage to cotton crops is just the tip of the iceberg.

Phenoxy damage to cotton is dramatic in that it is highly visible and can be hugely detrimental to yield.

Hence cotton receives the publicity, and unfortunately, in the eyes of some farmers, cotton growers are seen as the bad guys, as they restrict the use of herbicides in cotton growing areas.

What rubbish.

We all have a very clear obligation to contain all pesticides to their intended target, legally, morally and most importantly environmentally.

We all have a very clear obligation to contain all pesticides to their intended target, legally, morally and most importantly environmentally. – John Single

All too frequently we are seeing herbicide damage to all types of crops and from the various chemical groups, not as obvious as cotton, but it is occurring.

We see it in leaf discolouration, irregular plant growth, reduced or lost tillers and in worst instances plant death.

How often do we drive through cropping areas and witness the obvious damage to the trees, or drift onto pasture country.

In isolated instances traces of paraquat has been detected in grain.

That is frightening.

And what is that distortion in my garden plant and why did that garden plant die?

As a grower who helped develop our current zero tillage cropping systems in the 1980’s and proudly promoted “maximum sustainable economic yield” through zero tillage in the early 1990’s, it is way past time to speak out about pesticide damage that is occurring in this great industry of ours.

We own the industry, we are causing the problem and we must fix it.

If we choose to do nothing, there is no doubt that in time the problem will be fixed for us.

Take for example the European Union (EU), where the purchase and use of some pesticides is monitored and controlled.

The EU recently reviewed the use of glyphosate, where it’s use has been approved for a further five years in a close vote.

The implications of Australian farmers loosing glyphosate would be horrendous for farmers and the environment.

Won’t happen you say? remember Helix.

There is no debating that the current situation is unacceptable, it simply must change.

The choices are simple, do nothing and watch government cover the agricultural industry with red tape, and or have certain pesticides banned because of irresponsible use, or we self  regulate.

Self regulation could take many forms, education is the obvious starting point.

Self regulation could take many forms, education is the obvious starting point – John Single

But let’s make certain that the information we put out there is complete.

Drift occurs in many different situations and all needs to be contained, however the primary focus is inversion layer drift.

The industry has itself to blame for inadvertently promoting night and early morning spraying, when inversion conditions are most likely to exist.

This has occurred through the promotion of Delta T conditions under which to operate, ideally of no more than a Delta T eight, which in the summer months principally occurs at night and early morning.

Delta T is the difference between wet and dry bulb thermometer or a measurement of evaporation.

This has promoted better herbicide efficacy.

However no one said where to measure Delta T, so we rely on various weather stations that record well above ground level.

Unfortunately it is at ground level in the spraying environment that we are interested in.

Frequently Delta T is less at lower heights, so spraying can continue further into the day reducing the need to apply at night.

Weed stress and size have a huge effect on herbicide efficacy, and small rapidly growing weeds are far easier to control than large stressed weeds.

Frequently in a fallow spray program it is better to extend spray hours past Delta T of eight  in order to apply to small actively growing weeds, again reducing the need to spray at night.

The information as to how to contain drift is available, but it is an age old industry problem as to how to beat that information into growers heads.

Habits are hard to break, particularly when dollars are involved.

Chemical card training should be ramped up to include detailed information on drift control, the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicine Association (APVMA) need to look at labelling to include inversion layer restrictions, a minimum of a 3 km per hour wind does not mean that there is not an inversion layer.

If growers suffer drift from neighbours, let them know, they may not realise that they or their operators have caused a problem.

The industry used to have the slogan of “conservation farming, good farmers manage it”, it could now be “minimise drift, good farmers manage it”.

Let’s hope that we don’t need to resort to “it’s cool to dob in a drifter” and need to bring in a further drum levy similar to drum muster in order to fund policing of our great and proud industry.

2019 March – Helicopter Crash Bool Lagoon (South Australia)

Helicopter crashes into power lines at Bool Lagoon in the South East

https://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/helicopter-crashes-into-power-lines-at-bool-lagoon-in-the-south-east/news-story/1acd704906bb441cdcf1761e99e2c15e

A pilot has been injured after crashing his helicopter into power lines in the state’s South East.

Just after 2.30pm emergency services were called to the Bool Lagoon, just south of Naracoorte, after the helicopter clipped powerlines.

The pilot, a 31-year-old male from the South-East, suffered minor cuts and bruises in the crash and was taken to the Naracoorte Hospital for treatment.

Despite knocking down powerlines there have been no reports of power outages in the South-East.

2019 February: Growers lose $1 million from suspected toxic spray. Pesticide: 2,4-D suspected

DISASTER: Growers lose $1 million from suspected toxic spray

https://www.weeklytimesnow.com.au/news/regional/disaster-growers-lose-1-million-from-suspected-toxic-spray/news-story/ee3f97eca06663040bab83dd4f5e38e0

A SUSPECTED spray drift disaster has created a “nightmare harvest” for St George grape grower David Blacket and other farmers who now face an estimated $1 million loss in crops.

The first signs the toxic weed killer had drifted on to Riversands Vineyards and other crops started to show in September 2018 – that’s when Mr Blacket and other growers raised their concerns with Biosecurity Queensland. Growers were hoping their vines would grow out of the early leaf damage, however their harvest yielded small, unmarketable berries.

This resulted in a loss estimated to be in the seven figures.

The Riversands Vineyards owner said he and two other grape growers in the region were feeling the loss.

“It was a nightmare harvest, with approximately half of our Menindee crop unmarketable, due to below spec berry size,” Mr Blacket said.

“Bunch weights were lighter, picking costs were also doubled, due to higher piece rates required to compensate the slow picking.

“Aggregated losses across all the vineyards in St George is around one million dollars.”

The Balonne Beacon understands Biosecurity Queensland has launched an investigation into whether spray drift from 2,4-D affected crops.

The Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority introduced new 2,4-D label instructions in October 2018 in an attempt to curtail spray drift cases.

Users of 2,4-D now must comply with the new label instructions, even if they are using products with the old labels – which includes a requirement not to spray in inversion conditions and additional information on recognising inversion conditions.

These label changes came in less than a month after Mr Blacket and other growers reported their case to Biosecurity Queensland.

Mr Blacket previously told the Balonne Beacon he didn’t know the source of the 2,4-D spraying.

However he believes it has drifted from fallow weed spraying in the early weeks of September.

“This is money that won’t be circulating through the town, all because of careless spray application in unsuitable conditions,” he said.

“We (the horticultural industry) already cop enough risks growing these crops without additional risks from herbicide drift.

“It is so insidious and difficult to manage for.”

George Faessler, a nearby table grape grower, said his crops were also severely affected.

“My Flame Seedless crop was particularly hard hit, with most of the fruit unmarketable,” he said.

David Moon, an onion and cotton grower from Moonrocks, said he felt 2,4-D should be banned completely in horticultural and cotton regions.

“There are better, more cost effective options to use, which have far less risk attached,” he said.

 

2018 December: Spray Drift Costs Lucerne Grower $1.3m (Victoria)

Spray drift costs lucerne grower $1.3 million in damages

A LUCERNE grower has been ordered to pay more than $1.3 million in damages for herbicide spray drift that damaged a neighbouring spring onion crop.

Supreme Court Justice Melinda Richards ruled last week GG & PM Burrell — a family-owned company at Beverford, north of Swan Hill — was liable for drift from herbicide spraying of a lucerne crop in July 2014.

The spray drift damaged 12.14ha of commercial spring onions grown by Butler Market Gardens, another family-owned vegetable business.

Justice Richards found drift from the spraying of Burrell’s lucerne crop on July 28, 2014, damaged BMG’s spring onions crop.

Gavan Wilson, an independent contractor, was hired by Craig Burrell to spray and harvest the lucerne crop.

It is alleged Mr Burrell asked Mr Wilson to do the winter clean-up of a lucerne crop on the Burrell farm, ­including the lucerne crop to the north and northwest of the Swan Hill block.

Mr Burrell allegedly did not give Mr Wilson specific instructions beyond asking him to get it done and to be mindful of the spring onions.

“Before that day, the spring onions were in ‘fantastic’ condition and were ready to harvest exactly on target,” Justice Richards said.

“There was no sign of damage before the spraying and the first of the spring onions were in fact harvested on July 28, 2014.

“After Gavan Wilson spray­ed the lucerne to the north and west of the spring onions with herbicide, in weather conditions that were conducive to spray drift, many people ­observed the damage to the spring onions.

“The nature and pattern of the damage was consistent with herbicide spray drift.”

Justice Richards found neither Mr Burrell or Mr Wilson held an agricultural chemical user permit or a commercial operator licence.

BMG subsequently spent about $665,000 buying spring onions from a Queensland grower and transporting them to Victoria following the damage to their crop from the spray drift, in an effort to meet a supply commitment for ­supermarkets.

Justice Richards ordered Burrell to pay BMG $1,346,570 in damages for the lost crop.

Victorian Farmers Federation grains president Ross Johns said all farmers should take care when spraying crops or risk being held liable for damage.

“It’s our responsibility not to damage neighbouring property or anyone else’s property,” Mr Johns said.

“Farmers almost every year spray during the summer period — this year is very similar, in some areas there’s been higher rainfall and stronger weed growth.

“Weather conditions play a huge role in sprayer performance (and) the operator needs to be very aware of weather conditions.

“It’s just important to adhere to these guidelines.”

The Weekly Times had contacted the Butler family for comment.

2018 December – Farmers seek compensation over claims chemical contamination of herbicides wiped out vegetable crops (Victoria) – Pesticides:

Farmers seek compensation over claims chemical contamination of herbicides wiped out vegetable crops

Dec 17, 2018: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-12-17/australian-vegetable-farmers-legal-action-tainted-herbicides/10568578?fbclid=IwAR2_LGCa6eQ01AYVzeEE2a_V0cqzkF25rAerniqOoC6mUo8H7jccMAEWxI0

ome of Australia’s biggest vegetable farmers are fighting for compensation, claiming their food crops were decimated by contaminated herbicides.

Multinational chemical companies Syngenta and Nufarm recalled tens of thousands of litres of tainted herbicide in late 2016 and early 2017.

The products are commonly used on a range of vegetable crops including spring onions, leeks, carrots, celery and corn to control weeds.

They contained impurities from different herbicides, which have been traced back to the manufacturer.

But not before many farmers unwittingly sprayed the polluted products on their farms.

The national agrochemical regulator says the contaminants don’t pose a risk to human health, if used according to instructions.

But some growers claim the toxic mix-up wiped out many tonnes of valuable produce.

‘Huge financial stress’

One farmer, who doesn’t want to be named, says his business and his family have been devastated by the contamination.

“The crops just weren’t performing, they weren’t growing as they should, they were just slow or stunted, pale.”

He says agricultural experts have ruled out other potential causes, and tests suggest chemicals are to blame.

“The herbicide is doing the damage. I’m very confident of that,” the farmer said.

“We lost crops, we’ve lost income from that, we’re under huge financial stress.

“It hurt our family and our partnerships and it’s hurt relationships with other farmers and other people in the industry.

“It’s something that I wish had never happened.”

He is seeking compensation for the losses and says he is afraid to be identified for fear of a consumer backlash and punitive action by the chemical companies.

Do you know more about this story? Email NatRegional@abc.net.au.

A family struggle

The Victorian Farmers Federation (VFF) is concerned for the farmer’s welfare.

President of the VFF’s horticulture group Emma Germano says it’s taking a toll on his whole family.

Contaminants in Syngenta’s recalled Gesagard and Primextra Gold products and Nufarm’s recalled Ramrod product:

  • Diflufenican
  • Prometryn/Turbutryn
  • Propachlor
  • Simazine
  • Thidiazuron
  • Atrazine
  • MCPA
  • Propyzamide

*Not all the affected herbicides contained all the contaminants listed above
Source: The Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicine Authority (APVMA) and Nufarm

*Syngenta declined to provide the list of contaminants its analysis of the contaminated herbicides found.
Syngenta said it provided the information to the APVMA.

“Farming businesses are generally family businesses, and to see an entire family struggle with this has been very difficult,” she said.

“The amount of stress that he’s under and his family is under, and his extended family is under, is incredible.

“Watching this farmer go through such an incredible amount of financial and psychological stress has been the thing that we’ve been most concerned about for him,” she said.

He’s not the only farmer in dispute with the chemical companies over the allegations of crop damage.

Contamination in court

A major Victorian vegetable grower has taken his claim that contaminated herbicides wiped out his crops to the Supreme Court of Victoria.

Court documents show Riviera Farms is claiming contaminated batches of Syngenta’s Gesagard and Primextra Gold products spoiled carrot and corn crops.

The farm business is suing Syngenta and manufacturing company Accensi.

The contamination stemmed from a manufacturing fault at the Accensi factory where the herbicides were made and the company has been fined $100,000.

Defence documents show Syngenta and Accensi deny the allegations.

They’re blaming the crop failures on improper herbicide application and other farm-management failures.

Recall process slammed

One of the allegations in Riviera Farms’ statement of claim is that the farm was never notified of the herbicide recall.

A number of farmers and agricultural experts have criticised the recall process as inadequate and secretive.

The companies didn’t advertise the withdrawal but instead asked their chemical retailers to contact growers

The VFF’s Ms Germano says attempts to let farmers know did not go far enough.

“When this recall happened, it was a very piecemeal approach,” she said.

“It wasn’t reported widely enough. We’re concerned about the fact that the recall just essentially didn’t have farmers at its core.

“The Victorian Farmers Federation was not told about this recall.”

Ms Germano says some producers may still be unaware of the recall.

“We think that there needs to be a very clear recall process. If you want everyone to know about something that’s a problem, you make sure that everybody knows about it,” she said.

‘In severe distress’

US-based agricultural consultant and herbicide expert Chuck Kupatt says he’s seen crop damage on one of the affected farms.

“I saw plants that were in severe distress, were not growing in many instances, that would never form a crop,” he said.

Mr Kupatt says the testing suggests chemical contaminants are the cause.

“What I’ve seen would support that there’s damaging levels of residual compounds in that soil,” he said.

It’s now almost two years since the recall and Mr Kupatt says the issue should have been resolved by now.

“Everything is done in good faith, both when the companies develop the products, and when the farmers purchase them and use them,” he said.

“But if there’s a mistake, we have to put our big-boy pants on and say, ‘Yeah, OK, we had a problem and we’ll take care of the situation’.”

‘Unpredictable brew’

Mr Kupatt says the contaminants are chemicals that can be found in other herbicides for different crops.

But he said most of them would not normally be applied to the vegetable crops they were used on.

“Some of the contaminants that are on that list would generally not be used in vegetable culture because there is no tolerance to the crop,” he said.

“Which means if you spray them on the crop, you can get damage.”

Mr Kupatt says there is little or no independent science on how the contaminants might act in combination with each other, or with the active ingredients in the herbicide.

“Now that’s probably the biggest questions here … nobody would have ever thought to research those combinations,” he said.

“There’s several different types of chemistry here with many different modes of action.

“If you had any combination of these, you’re probably going to have a pretty unpredictable brew when you have them all put together into a product. So putting five or six of them together is a really, really difficult situation.”

‘Cocktail of herbicides’

Agricultural consultant David Bell has been employed by a number of farmers concerned about chemical contamination to provide expert advice.

He says farmers are afraid to speak out about the problem.

“These are very, very large multinational chemical companies, who wield big sticks in the industry,” he said.

He says the mix of chemicals means there could be a multiplication effect going on.

“What we’ve got is a cocktail of herbicides in the drums,” he said.

“We’ve got a poor plant trying to outgrow one herbicide, then being whacked by a second or third or even fourth or fifth herbicide.”

He too says he’s seen the personal toll the dispute is taking.

“I see farmers stand in paddocks with tears running down their face, looking at crops that these farmers take pride in growing,” he said.

“Their crops are literally dying before their eyes … These are very, very good vegetable farmers that are struggling to have people understand that it’s the herbicides that have caused the damage to their farms.”

Call for inquiry

Independent agricultural and herbicide expert John Seidel said it would be very difficult to prove the combination of chemical contaminants was totally safe for crops.

“When you put it in different soil types … the amount of breakdown depends on microbial action, on amount of rainfall, and a lot of factors come into play,” he said.

“I think it needs a bit more due diligence, a bit more stewardship from the companies to find out exactly what is going on here.”

“They could get an independent umpire to look into it, and that would satisfy both parties,” he said.

“If you had someone independent gathering the information, and the company has got nothing to hide, that would be wonderful for them as well.”

Companies say they acted swiftly

In a statement to the ABC, Syngenta defended the way it carried out the recall.

It said the company, “does not have access to the contact details of every farmer” in Australia and that it went through herbicide retailers because of their direct access to farmers.

Syngenta said this course of action was in accordance with the voluntary recall guidelines of the national agrochemical regulator, the APVMA.

The company also said it carried out its own scientific risk assessments, which confirmed the contamination posed an extremely low risk to the environment, crops or animals.

And that this information was provided to the APVMA as part of the voluntary recall process.

Syngenta said it was dealing with two claims from vegetable growers.

The company also said it had appointed an independent research agronomist to help address potential concerns from growers about the withdrawn batches of contaminated herbicide, and that those discussions would be confidential.

Nufarm said it was alerted to the problem by a grower’s report of crop damage and that it swiftly notified the APVMA and conducted a thorough voluntary recall.

Nufarm said in its recall notice that use of the affected herbicides might result in crop damage, and offered free testing of produce and soil.

The company said it used a range of methods to reach growers who might have used the contaminated product, including contacting chemical retailers, peak horticultural bodies and, in some cases, farmers directly.

Nufarm said it had worked with growers who made claims on a case-by-case basis, and that only one claim remained outstanding.

Accensi declined to comment, as did the Federal Agriculture Minister, David Littleproud.

Process needs to be ‘robust’

Since the recall, the APVMA has made changes to recall processes and now publishes voluntary recalls on its website.

But critics say it’s not enough, and that advertising of all recalls should be compulsory.

While this contamination didn’t spark human health concerns from authorities, affected farmers say it has raised questions about the adequacy of agrochemical regulation in Australia.

Ms Germano says there are rules in place to protect farmers and food safety, but its important to make sure those rules are working.

“We saw that there was an improvement in the process, through the APVMA when this incident occurred,” she said.

“But we just want to make sure that this process is really robust.

“Mistakes happen, but we need to be able to deal with that when it happens.”

It’s too late for farmers who say they’ve suffered as a result of this contamination.

One farmer, who wanted to remain anonymous, told the ABC it was not up to growers to take on the chemical giants when things like this go wrong.

He said the APVMA should be protecting farmers from damaging incidents like this and the companies involved should be more helpful.

“I speak to a number of growers around Victoria and Australia,” he said.

“It certainly hurt a lot of businesses, and some can’t afford to fight it, and some just can’t win the battle … They knew there was damage, they should’ve helped growers a lot more.

“It was handled badly and we’ve got to learn from this … The next time it happens, and it will happen again, it’s got to be handled better.”

2018 November: Griffith Spraydrift (New South Wales). Pesticide: 2,4-D

Further drift incidents cause concern

Gregor Heard@grheard

https://www.northqueenslandregister.com.au/story/5757590/further-drift-incidents-cause-concern/?cs=4751

Australian sprayers are being cautioned they risk losing critical chemistry if they continue to cause damage through spray drift.

JUST weeks after the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) issued new regulations to do with usage of 2,4-D herbicides to reduce the risk of drift there have been reports down the east coast of summer crop damaged by chemical drift.

Spray application expert Mary O’Brien said she had been contacted about drift events in locations ranging from central Queensland to as far south as Griffith in the Riverina.

“It’s a real concern, I’ve been a strong advocate of making sure you do everything right to minimise the risk of inversion but it does not appear the message is getting through.

“If we’re not careful there’s the real risk this chemistry will be taken off us, and I imagine the people farming in areas where there is not a summer cropping industry will not be pleased to lose a valuable chemistry because of incidents like these,” Ms O’Brien said.

Her comments on drift incidents were backed up by an agronomist in the Moree district who declined to be named.

He said a client had lost 150 hectares of cotton due to drift damage from an unknown chemical.

“We don’t know what it chemical it was exactly but the damage has certainly been done.”

“It is still early enough to replant, but the cost of sourcing new seed and replanting is going to be around $100/ha, so it is a substantial cost.”

Further to this, Ms O’Brien said she had heard of issues with cotton in CQ, grape vines that suffered from chemical damage in the St George area and 34ha of cotton damaged at Griffith.

Ms O’Brien has previously spoken out about the risks of night spraying.

“For me, in order to manage risk properly, I would not be spraying at night because the risk of inversion is just too great,” she said.

“In virtually all instances in Australian conditions over virtually all year, the risk of inversion grows at night so it is something you have to weigh up very carefully.”

Grain Producers South Australia chairman Wade Dabinett said grain growers in SA, which a strong viticulture sector, have long understood the need for minimising drift.

“People who farm around grape areas know they have to be super careful not to jeopardise other people’s livelihoods,” Mr Dabinett said.

“I think we are doing the right thing and showing we are good stewards of products such as 2,4-D, which is in our interest as we want to retain the chemistry.”

The story Further drift incidents cause concern first appeared on Farm Online.

2018 November: St. George Grapevine Damage (NSW). Pesticide: 2,4-D

Further drift incidents cause concern

Gregor Heard@grheard

https://www.northqueenslandregister.com.au/story/5757590/further-drift-incidents-cause-concern/?cs=4751

Australian sprayers are being cautioned they risk losing critical chemistry if they continue to cause damage through spray drift.

JUST weeks after the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) issued new regulations to do with usage of 2,4-D herbicides to reduce the risk of drift there have been reports down the east coast of summer crop damaged by chemical drift.

Spray application expert Mary O’Brien said she had been contacted about drift events in locations ranging from central Queensland to as far south as Griffith in the Riverina.

“It’s a real concern, I’ve been a strong advocate of making sure you do everything right to minimise the risk of inversion but it does not appear the message is getting through.

“If we’re not careful there’s the real risk this chemistry will be taken off us, and I imagine the people farming in areas where there is not a summer cropping industry will not be pleased to lose a valuable chemistry because of incidents like these,” Ms O’Brien said.

Her comments on drift incidents were backed up by an agronomist in the Moree district who declined to be named.

He said a client had lost 150 hectares of cotton due to drift damage from an unknown chemical.

“We don’t know what it chemical it was exactly but the damage has certainly been done.”

“It is still early enough to replant, but the cost of sourcing new seed and replanting is going to be around $100/ha, so it is a substantial cost.”

Further to this, Ms O’Brien said she had heard of issues with cotton in CQ, grape vines that suffered from chemical damage in the St George area and 34ha of cotton damaged at Griffith.

Ms O’Brien has previously spoken out about the risks of night spraying.

“For me, in order to manage risk properly, I would not be spraying at night because the risk of inversion is just too great,” she said.

“In virtually all instances in Australian conditions over virtually all year, the risk of inversion grows at night so it is something you have to weigh up very carefully.”

Grain Producers South Australia chairman Wade Dabinett said grain growers in SA, which a strong viticulture sector, have long understood the need for minimising drift.

“People who farm around grape areas know they have to be super careful not to jeopardise other people’s livelihoods,” Mr Dabinett said.

“I think we are doing the right thing and showing we are good stewards of products such as 2,4-D, which is in our interest as we want to retain the chemistry.”

The story Further drift incidents cause concern first appeared on Farm Online.

2018 November: Spraydrift (Central Queensland). Pesticide: 2,4-D

Further drift incidents cause concern

Gregor Heard@grheard

https://www.northqueenslandregister.com.au/story/5757590/further-drift-incidents-cause-concern/?cs=4751

Australian sprayers are being cautioned they risk losing critical chemistry if they continue to cause damage through spray drift.

JUST weeks after the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) issued new regulations to do with usage of 2,4-D herbicides to reduce the risk of drift there have been reports down the east coast of summer crop damaged by chemical drift.

Spray application expert Mary O’Brien said she had been contacted about drift events in locations ranging from central Queensland to as far south as Griffith in the Riverina.

“It’s a real concern, I’ve been a strong advocate of making sure you do everything right to minimise the risk of inversion but it does not appear the message is getting through.

“If we’re not careful there’s the real risk this chemistry will be taken off us, and I imagine the people farming in areas where there is not a summer cropping industry will not be pleased to lose a valuable chemistry because of incidents like these,” Ms O’Brien said.

Her comments on drift incidents were backed up by an agronomist in the Moree district who declined to be named.

He said a client had lost 150 hectares of cotton due to drift damage from an unknown chemical.

“We don’t know what it chemical it was exactly but the damage has certainly been done.”

“It is still early enough to replant, but the cost of sourcing new seed and replanting is going to be around $100/ha, so it is a substantial cost.”

Further to this, Ms O’Brien said she had heard of issues with cotton in CQ, grape vines that suffered from chemical damage in the St George area and 34ha of cotton damaged at Griffith.

Ms O’Brien has previously spoken out about the risks of night spraying.

“For me, in order to manage risk properly, I would not be spraying at night because the risk of inversion is just too great,” she said.

“In virtually all instances in Australian conditions over virtually all year, the risk of inversion grows at night so it is something you have to weigh up very carefully.”

Grain Producers South Australia chairman Wade Dabinett said grain growers in SA, which a strong viticulture sector, have long understood the need for minimising drift.

“People who farm around grape areas know they have to be super careful not to jeopardise other people’s livelihoods,” Mr Dabinett said.

“I think we are doing the right thing and showing we are good stewards of products such as 2,4-D, which is in our interest as we want to retain the chemistry.”

The story Further drift incidents cause concern first appeared on Farm Online.

2018 September: Alstonville Bee Deaths (New South Wales). Pesticide: Fipronil

Independent Testing found Fipronil in these bees at 0.005ug/bee (sep/oct 2018)

Cause of mass bee death a mystery

EARLIER this month, Alstonville amateur beekeeper Mark Fleming managed to find a break in the rain, and went out to check on his beehives. What he found horrified him.

There were hundreds of dead and dying bees blanketing ground at the foot of his hives, with more appearing out of the hive with every passing second.

“They were just coming out of the hive and falling and dying,” Mr Fleming said.

“I didn’t even think that it could be poison at first.”

After studying some of the dead bees, Mr Fleming started to notice recurring characteristics.

“Dying bees have been showing jerky movements, and have been falling on to their sides and back,” he said.

“Their proboscises have also been protruding, which is something that usually only happens while foraging.”

Following research online, Mr Fleming believes the bees had all been poisoned by chemical sprays or pesticides.

Mark soon discovered that his hives weren’t the only ones affected.

Sandy Jeudwine and Michael Koenen live one kilometre away from Mark, and are fellow amateur beekeepers, and discovered their bees were dying too.

He believed that it may have been happening from a few days before, due to the amount of dead bees, but can’t be sure.

The largest hives have been the ones hit most severely.

It is impossible to calculate just how many bees have been lost, however the numbers are in the thousands.

Even dead larvae have been spotted being thrown out of Michael and Sandy’s hives, impacting the next generation of bees as well.

“It’s an agonising death. It’s not sudden, but slow and painful,” Mr Fleming said.

Honey bees can forage for anywhere up to a two- kilometre radius from their hives, so trying to figure out where the poisoning happened would be practically impossible.

Mrs Jeudwine hopes that the poisoning was an accidental mistake.

Northern Rivers Amateur Beekeepers Association’s biosecurity officer Stephen Fowler said they were not trying to point the finger or place blame on someone.

“We just want people to understand,” Mrs Jeudwine said.

“We love our bees, so we’re just devastated,” Mrs Jeudwine said.

“We’re natural beekeepers, so we got into beekeeping to care for the welfare of the bees.”

Testing the dead bees for cause of death is very expensive, and even so, it would be difficult to pinpoint the exact poison or chemical.

What makes the whole situation worse is with every single hive affected, there is the possibility that the keepers have lost queens out of one or more of their hives, and it would be difficult to replace them.

“We’re just hoping that the hives can hold out and survive so that we can introduce a new queen if necessary,” Mr Fleming said.

The NSW Environment Protection Authority received two reports of bee deaths last week, and is investigating.

EPA Director North Adam Gilligan said the EPA took all reports of bee deaths very seriously and would consider all avenues, including impact from pesticides as part of its investigation.

“Bees play an important role in any healthy ecosystem and are essential for the survival of many plant species and food crops,” Mr Gilligan said.

“To help reduce risks to bees from pesticide spraying, we encourage beekeepers to let farmers know specifically when and where they are going to put their hives.”

Any pesticide spraying should be undertaken at night when bees are not foraging.

Farmers have a responsibility to ensure they are using herbicides and pesticides safely, including following product instructions carefully, monitoring local weather conditions and connecting with any local bee keepers, other farmers and surrounding neighbours ahead of time.

The EPA contacted the Australian Macadamia Society last week to remind growers that

We encourage people to report any suspected pesticide misuse to the EPA’s Environment Line 131555, providing as much information about the incident as possible.

For further information about pesticide misuse, please refer to the EPA’s website https://www.epa.nsw.gov.au/your-environment/pesticides/preventing-pesticide-misuse.

It is an offence under the EPA’s legislation to use pesticides in a manner that harms non-target animals with hefty penalties.

The maximum penalties for this are $120,000 for an individual, and $250,000 for a corporation.

2018 October: Indian Government Warns About Glyphosate on Dals. Pesticide: Glyphosate

Modi govt says imported Moong and Masoor dals  likely to be poisonous

Oct 23 2018: https://www.nationalheraldindia.com/india/modi-govt-says-imported-moong-and-masoor-dals-likely-to-be-poisonous

FSSAI has issued warning to people to halt the consumption of Moong and Masoor dal. These lentils contain residues of the highly toxic herbicide Glyphosate, used by farmers to clear weeds

The Food Safety and Standards of India (FSSAI) has issued warning to people to halt the consumption of Moong and Masoor dal. These lentils contain residues of the highly toxic herbicide Glyphosate, used by farmers to clear weeds. It is being imported from Canada and Australia.

India does not have its own regulations on toxic herbicide Glyphosate. Therefore, FSSAI has adopted the international standards in order to ensure that the lentils being sold are safe for consumption.

According to report in The Pioneer, “There is a possibility of higher levels of residues of the herbicide Glyphosate in pulses which could adversely affect the health of consumers here. Since the maximum residual limits (MRL) for Glyphosate in pulses has not been specified in the FSSAI regulations, we have asked the concerned officials to follow the MRL for the herbicide as specified in the Codex standards,” said Food Safety and Standards of India official.

FSSAI has also directed laboratories to test the pulses for ‘Glyphosate” along with other parameters.

The apex food regulation authority came into action after Canadian food security activist Santanu Mitra alleged that imported lentils from Australia moong dal and Canadian masoor dal contain high level of Glyphosate. Food safety and agricultural scientists too are issuing warning that the use of glyphosate may prove dangerous as in Sri Lanka, where many sugarcane farmers died due to renal failure after being overexposed to the herbicide.

“Mitra thinks that the Indian diet might have become overly contaminated from imported pulses. The pulses need to be tested for glyphosate residue at every entry point which is not being carried out presently,” said an FSSAI official.

Till 2015, the herbicide Glyphosate was considered to be safe but then the WHO’s IARC classified it as a probable human carcinogen. In India, it seems that Glyphosate is being used as a pre-harvest desiccant in several crops resulting in high residues in food.

Dr GV Ramanjaneyulu, agricultural scientist and founder of Centre for Sustainable Agriculture said in a report that while it is mandatory to label organic products, imported pulses are not labelled. “It’s very difficult to find out if we are consuming Canadian pulses or locally grown ones, if they are sold in loose,” he warned.

2018 October – 4 Spray Drift Incidents (Central Highlands Queensland ). Pesticide:2,4-D

Cotton looks promising

19 October 2018 – Central Highlands Queensland

https://www.queenslandcountrylife.com.au/story/5712465/spray-drift-strikes-central-highlands-cotton/

“… It’s not all positive in the region though, with four incidents of spray drift causing damage to crops already.

Cotton Australia chief executive officer, Adam Kay, said it was incredibly disappointing and frustrating to see that many reports already this season.

“It will take a little bit of time to see whether it’s actually just been a light dusting and it might grow through, or if it’s been quite heavy and affects the plant,” he said.

“The next couple of weeks will tell if the crops can recover from it.”

Mr Kay said he encouraged all farmers who use 2,4-D to look at the new guidelines and label changes, and act accordingly.

“In talking to the APVMA, if these changes they’ve made don’t result in a reduction in spray drift, or an elimination of spray drift, they’ve got to move to much more severe restrictions,” he said.

2017 December. Mackay Catchment (Queensland). Pesticides: Chlorpyrifos, DEET, Imidacloprid, 2,4-D, Atrazine, Diuron, Hexazinone, MCPA, Metolachlor, 4-Nonylphenol-mono-ethoxylate, 4-Nonylphenol-di-ethoxylate

Mackay Catchment Qld – December 2017

Chlorpyrifos: 0.0057ug/L (highest detection)

DEET: 0.0116ug/L (highest detection)

Imidacloprid: 0.415ug/L (highest detection)

2,4-D: 0.045ug/L (highest detection)

Atrazine: 0.0206ug/L (highest detection)

Diuron: 0.0274ug/L (highest detection)

Hexazinone: 0.0516ug/L (highest detection)

MCPA: 0.0226ug/L (highest detection)

Metolachlor: 0.0067ug/L (highest detection)

4-Nonylphenol-mono-ethoxylate (adjuvant): 0.0154ug/L (highest detection)

4-tert-Octylphenol (adjuvant): 0.0067ug/L (highest detection)

4-Nonylphenol-di-ethoxylate (adjuvant): 0.0097ug/L (highest detection)

Metalaxyl: 0.0064ug/L (highest detection)

Source: The impacts of modern-use pesticides on shrimp agriculture: An assessment for north eastern Australia. Article in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety: February 2018 (Hook, Sellars, Kookana, Kumar)

2017 April: Burnett-Mary Catchment (Queensland. Pesticides: Imidacloprid, 2,4-D, Atrazine, Diuron, Hexazinone, Metolachlor, 4-Nonylphenol-mono-ethoxylate, 4-Nonylphenol-di-ethoxylate, Metalaxyl

Burnett-Mary Catchment Qld – April 2017

Imidacloprid: 0.0173ug/L (highest detection)

2,4-D: 0.0311ug/L (highest detection)

Atrazine: 0.136ug/L (highest detection)

Diuron: 0.0153ug/L (highest detection)

Hexazinone: 0.036ug/L (highest detection)

Metolachlor: 0.155ug/L (highest detection)

4-Nonylphenol-mono-ethoxylate (adjuvant): 0.0101ug/L (highest detection)

4-Nonylphenol-di-ethoxylate (adjuvant): 0.006ug/L (highest detection)

Metalaxyl: 0.0064ug/L (highest detection)

Source: The impacts of modern-use pesticides on shrimp agriculture: An assessment for north eastern Australia. Article in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety: February 2018 (Hook, Sellars, Kookana, Kumar)

2017 March: Logan Catchment (Queensland). Pesticides: Bifenthrin, Chlorpyrifos, Clothianidin, Fipronil, Imidacloprid, 2,4-D, Atrazine, MCPA, Metolachlor, 4-Nonylphenol-mono-ethoxylate, 4-Nonylphenol-di-ethoxylate, Bentrotriazole

Logan Catchment Qld – March 2017

Bifenthrin: 0.0206ug/L (highest detection)

Chlorpyrifos: 0.043ug/L (highest detection)

Clothianidin: 0.0049ug/L (highest detection)

Fipronil: 0.0738ug/L (highest detection)

Imidacloprid: 0.0297ug/L (highest detection)

2,4-D: 0.0644ug/L (highest detection)

Atrazine: 0.0042ug/L (highest detection)

MCPA: 0.0145ug/L (highest detection)

Metolachlor: 0.211ug/L (highest detection)

4-Nonylphenol-mono-ethoxylate (adjuvant): 0.0211ug/L (highest detection)

4-Nonylphenol-di-ethoxylate (adjuvant): 0.0142ug/L (highest detection)

Benzotriazole (corrosion inhibitor): 0.0142ug/L (highest detection)

Source: The impacts of modern-use pesticides on shrimp agriculture: An assessment for north eastern Australia. Article in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety: February 2018 (Hook, Sellars, Kookana, Kumar)

2017 March: Clarence Catchment (New South Wales). Pesticides: Chlorpyrifos, 2,4-D, Atrazine, Diuron, Hexazinone, Metolachlor, Tebuthiuron,

Clarence Catchment NSW

Chlorpyrifos: 0.0179ug/L (highest detection)

2,4-D: 0.01450ug/L (highest detection)

Atrazine: 0.011ug/L (highest detection)

Diuron: 0.0187ug/L (highest detection)

Hexazinone: 0.0038ug/L (highest detection)

Metolachlor: 0.0098ug/L (highest detection)

Tebuthiuron: 0.0023ug/L (highest detection)

Source: The impacts of modern-use pesticides on shrimp agriculture: An assessment for north eastern Australia. Article in Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety: February 2018 (Hook, Sellars, Kookana, Kumar)

2018 September: Katherine (Northern Territory). 1 Million Bees Poisoned. Pesticide: Fipronil

About 1 million bees dead in NT after second suspected deliberate poisoning incident in a year

NT Country Hour

https://www.abc.net.au/news/rural/2018-09-25/million-bees-dead-in-second-suspected-deliberate-poisoning-nt/10297858

A Northern Territory beekeeper says about 1 million of his bees have been deliberately killed with an insecticide, in the second suspected poisoning of commercial bee boxes near Katherine in a year.

Sam Curtis found the dead bees inside and near their boxes on a track outside Katherine, a few kilometres off the Victoria Highway, in July.

Last week he received confirmation from a laboratory that the bees had died from Fipronil poisoning — an insecticide commonly used to kill termites.

The hives were about 5 kilometres from where another beekeeper had about 120 hives of bees die from the same insecticide in November.

Mr Curtis said the loss of bees would set his business back about $20,000.

“We had 100 breeding colonies that were completely decimated and we had probably 20 full-strength hives that were totally destroyed,” he said.

“The rest were severely weakened, so we had to clean out the comb in the boxes so there was no [insecticide] residue affecting the brood rearing, so the bees can recover.

Mr Curtis has ruled out the bees being accidentally poisoned by insecticide use on a nearby mango farm because it was spraying a different chemical.

He suspected the person responsible for the poisoning was someone who “doesn’t like bees”.

“Some people reckon it could be greenies because they think that [European] bees attack the native bee colonies, so they would try and kill the European species,” Mr Curtis said.

“Or it could be anyone related to the agriculture sector because Fipronil is a rather difficult chemical to come across.”

Two mass bee poisonings may be linked

More than 10 months on from the mass poisoning of Nathan Woods’s bees near Katherine, no-one has been held responsible and NT Police have closed their investigation.

Mr Curtis said it was possible the two cases were linked because they both occurred in the same area.

“Both of us like to put bees out that way for various trees, but our beehives aren’t very noticeable from the road,” he said.

“So this person obviously goes up and down [that track] regularly, if it is the same person.”

In addition to the loss of the bees, Mr Curtis said he was reluctant to return his bees to what was one of his best locations to place his hives.

“We were trying to breed queen bees to replace some of the hives that were dying over the years for pollination; this has really screwed that up because that was our queening site,” he said.

Mr Curtis said he had asked NT Police to investigate the deaths of his bees.

2016 September – Broken Hill Area 60 Dead Eagles (New South Wales) – Methomyl

https://markpearson.org.au/question-without-notice-lannate-l-insecticide/

Question Without Notice-Lannate L Insecticide

On our recent visit to Broken Hill where I hosted a community forum, some alarming reports of animal cruelty and abuse were conveyed to myself and my staff. One of the more distressing issues was that of farmers and landholders using Lannate L insecticide, a highly dangerous schedule seven chemical, to poison wild animals, including wild dogs, foxes and wedge tail eagles. Reports of even insect eating animals such as birds and echidnas dying from consuming ants that have landed on Lannate L baited carcassess has sparked serious community concern.

I questioned the Minister on this issue and it seems he has forgotten that he is the person responsible for animal welfare in this state. Whether an animal is native or not is irrelevant, the issue here is the unauthorised use of a highly dangerous poison on wild animals which causes immense suffering and a slow lingering death.

Question

Mark Pearson MLC

My question is directed to the Minister for Primary Industries. At my recent community forum in Broken Hill I was told that it was common practice for landholders to purchase Lannate L, a schedule 7 insecticide, known colloquially as “Magic” because if used undiluted on a carcass it will kill anything. I was told of a sheep farmer who killed 60 wedge-tailed eagles in one week.

Will the Minister advise whether the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority has approved the use of Lannate L for wild animal control?

If not, will the Minister direct his department to investigate this unauthorised and cruel use of a schedule 7 poison?

2018 September: Tubbut (East Gippsland) – Farm Worker Jailed for Poisoning 406 Wedge-Tail Eagles. Pesticide: Methomyl

Farm worker who poisoned 406 wedge-tailed eagles in east Gippsland jailed and fined

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-24/man-poisoned-wedge-tailed-eagles-in-gippsland-jailed/10298426

A New Zealand man has been jailed for 14 days and fined $2,500 for poisoning 406 wedge-tailed eagles at three remote properties in Victoria’s east.

Key points:

  • It’s the first time in Victorian history a person has been jailed for wildlife destruction
  • The farm worker said he poisoned the birds under the direction of his employer
  • A retired wildlife officer says such culling of eagles is common on farms

Farm worker Murray James Silvester, 59, pleaded guilty to killing the protected birds at Tubbut in east Gippsland between October 2016 and April 2018.

The eagle carcasses were found hidden in bush and scrub on three separate farms spanning 2,000 hectares.

Other protected species including a kookaburra, ravens and a raptor were also found dead

Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning (DELWP) prosecutor Chrisanthi Paganis told the Sale Magistrates’ Court Silvester first alerted authorities to his actions in May 2018 after an argument with his boss, landowner John Auer.

Silvester provided investigators with two diaries detailing the methods used and a hand-drawn map showing where the eagle carcasses were hidden and where the chemicals were stored.

Silvester also named others involved.

The prosecutor told the court other people were being investigated over the killings but had not been charged.

Chemicals injected into necks of sheep to lure eagles

Ms Paganis told the court three different chemicals were used to kill the eagles, but most of the eagle deaths were caused by the chemical Lannate (Methomyl).

“John Auer showed him how to do it by injecting the substances into the necks of lambs,” Ms Paganis told the court.

Lannate caused the eagles to die within 30 minutes of feeding on the sheep and lamb carcasses, the court heard.

Over the 18-month period, Silvester experimented with other chemicals, including a blue phosphorous which made the eagles severely sick but did not kill them straight away.

Sale Magistrates’ Court heard Silvester admitted to killing 366 eagles during 2017 and another 40 in early 2018 at the properties at 2742, 2744 and 2789 McKillops Road, Tubbut.

Orders, court hears

A report for DELWP estimated it would take two and a half years before breeding recovered to its pre-kill levels.

“This is our first custodial sentence for the destruction of wildlife in Victoria, so it’s a significant statement to make by the courts, that this is a very, very serious matter and this is how it will be dealt with,” said Iain Bruce, the manager of DELWP’s investigations and intelligence unit.

Defence lawyer Keith Borthwick told the court Silvester’s employer played a role in the eagle deaths.

“It was under the instruction of his employer,” Mr Borthwick said.

He said Silvester was under pressure to increase lamb survival rates.

The court was told the maximum penalty for killing that many eagles was more than $350,000 or six months’ jail.

“You brought this to the attention of authorities because you had an argument with your boss,” Magistrate Rodney Higgins told Mr Silvester.

Silvester pleaded guilty to two charges under the Wildlife Act and was sentenced to 14 days in prison and fined $2,500.

“You’ll be back home in New Zealand in a month,” Magistrate Higgins told Silvester.

The magistrate told the court he would have sentenced Silvester to three months in prison, had he not pleaded guilty to the charges at the first opportunity. 

Eagle culls ‘widespread’ on farms

Retired wildlife officer Roger Bilney said the illegal killing of wedge-tailed eagles was not isolated to the Tubbut case.

“It’s a multiple state issue, a national issue, which needs further research,” Mr Bilney said.

“This is threatening the whole species and it’s an iconic bird. People will stop and watch as they soar past. The wedge-tailed eagle is an iconic bird, a part of the Australian landscape,” he said.

He said eagles were also targeted as predators to lambs in New South Wales and Queensland.

“Especially with the value of wool and lambs increasing, a lot of farmers see the wedge-tailed eagles as a threat to their profitability,” Mr Bilney said.

“They’re certainly capable of killing newborn lambs, and we know that they do that at times and they will team up and do it, but in terms of the overall losses on a sheep farm, research shows it’s irrelevant to the overall property,” Mr Bilney said.

“Especially with the drought, and so many lambs dying due to the ewes being in poor condition, there’d be a higher mortality due to poor farming practices, or things like drought that are beyond their control,” Mr Bilney said.

‘Bloody well done’: Texts and emails reveal scheme to poison eagles

November 14 2019

https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/bloody-well-done-texts-and-emails-reveal-scheme-to-poison-eagles-20190917-p52s0z.html

The messages from a Gippsland land owner congratulating his employee for killing dozens of wedge-tailed eagles have been revealed after the businessman admitted to his part in the scheme.

John Franz Auer’s farm manager Murray Silvester injected the carcasses of lambs, sheep and kangaroos with insecticide to use as bait to kill eagles over about two years.

Environment Department officers discovered at least 134 dead wedge-tailed eagles, along with the carcasses of four other protected bird species on Auer’s properties in May and June last year.

“I just wouldn’t have dreamed of those numbers. Bloody well done,” Auer said in messages to his farm manager.

The emails and text messages, in which the pair secretly referred to eagles as “foxes”, were revealed at Bairnsdale Magistrates Court on Wednesday as Auer, 57, pleaded guilty to the misuse of agricultural chemicals.

Auer also admitted to his involvement in offences carried out by Silvester, who was last year found guilty of injecting animal carcasses with insecticide to use as bait.

On October 5, 2016, Auer messaged Silvester asking: “Seen any eagles?”

“6 more = 24 in 2 days,” Silvester replied.

“Gee that’s amazing, they just keep coming? I just wouldn’t have dreamed of those numbers. Bloody well done,” Auer replied a few days later.

In late October of 2016, Auer messaged Silvester saying he had picked up a “different chem to try”, later adding he had “looked up that poison and it is deadly to birds apparently so should work”.

At some stage, Auer told Silvester to refer to eagles within email communication as “foxes”, court documents show.

In January 2017, Silvester wrote to Auer: “3 more foxs [sic] = 52, crazy”.

In August that year, after Silvester said he had “got” five foxes, Auer replied: “Well done on foxes, I wonder where a group of 7 come from hey. Gee your [sic] good at getting straight onto them now.”

Then, in November 2017, Auer wrote: “The eagles just keep coming, it continues to astound me, but your [sic] doing a good job on them”.

Court documents show Auer hired Silvester as a farm manager in 2016 in Tubbut, near the Snowy River National Park, where he operates a sheep grazing business on several thousand acres of land.

Silvester, a New Zealand national, was charged by the Environment Department and found guilty in September last year of killing 420 wedge-tailed eagles in East Gippsland over a two-year period and sentenced to 14 days in jail and fined $2500.

Auer was then charged by the Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions in June for the misuse and incorrect storage of agricultural chemicals, including poisons and pesticides.

In March 2017, the court documents show, Auer supplied Silvester with a quantity of Lannate, an insecticide that contains a substance toxic to humans and animals called methomyl.

Eagles have historically been blamed by farmers for the deaths of lambs.

Auer was also convicted on Wednesday of failing to comply with the conditions of an Agricultural Chemical User Permit by storing and using Lannate incorrectly and for failing to comply with storage instructions relating to 1080 wild dog bait.

On two charges, Auer was convicted, given a 12-month good behaviour bond and ordered to pay $25,000 to a court fund to be distributed among wildlife groups in Gippsland. He was also ordered to pay department costs of $3870.

On four remaining charges, Auer was convicted and sentenced to a community corrections order for a period of 12 months, under which he must perform 100 hours of community service.

 

2018 May: Mechanics of Pesticide-Parkinsons Link Revealed. Pesticides: Paraquat, Maneb

Mechanics of pesticide-Parkinson’s link revealed

A genetic mutation massively increases risk for agrochemical exposure.

Andrew Masterton (Cosmos Magazine) May 25 2018

https://cosmosmagazine.com/biology/mechanics-of-pesticide-parkinson-s-link-revealed

Even very low levels of exposure to some common agricultural chemicals can boost the risk of Parkinson’s disease, according to new research.

A paper published in the journal Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology reveals that exposure to pesticides known as paraquat and maneb dramatically affects the function of dopamine-producing neurons – the cells primarily targeted by Parkinson’s – in people carrying a particular genetic mutation.

Separate lines of research kicked off two decades ago identified the chemicals and the mutation – in a gene known as alpha-synuclein, located on chromosome four – as risk factors for developing Parkinson’s, but the latest study is the first to uncover what happens on a cellular level when the two combine.

“People exposed to these chemicals are at about a 250% higher risk of developing Parkinson’s disease than the rest of the population,” says Scott Ryan from the University of Guelph in Ontario, Canada, lead author of the new study.

“We wanted to investigate what is happening in this susceptible population that results in some people developing the disease.”

The role of chemical exposure in influencing risk for Parkinson’s was first identified in epidemiological studies, starting in 1998.

A separate line of investigation around the same time focussed on a large Italian family group prone to developing the disease, many members of which carried the alpha-synuclein mutation.

Ryan and his colleagues set out to determine what happens to human cell function when both risk factors are combined.

To do so researchers established two cohorts of stem cells. The first used cells derived from Parkinson’s patients known to be carrying the mutation. The second derived from standard embryonic stem cells into which the mutation was edited.

Both sets were induced to form the target neurons, which were then exposed to varying levels of paraquat and maneb.

In cells containing the mutation even very low levels of exposure prevented the mitochondria from functioning correctly, depriving the neurons of essential energy and causing them to fail.

Cells that did not carry the mutation needed higher doses before function was impaired.

“Until now, the link between pesticides and Parkinson’s disease was based primarily on animal studies as well as epidemiological research that demonstrated an increased risk among farmers and others exposed to agricultural chemicals,” explains Ryan.

“We are one of the first to investigate what is happening inside human cells.”

Critical exposure levels for the mutation-carrying cells were lower than the maximum safe levels contained in Canadian Environmental Protection Authority regulations.

Ryan says that the results indicate that current one-level-fits-all advice for chemical exposure needs to be ditched.

“This study shows that everyone is not equal, and these safety standards need to be updated in order to protect those who are more susceptible and may not even know it,” he says.

2016/19: Glenelg Waste Water Treatment Plant (South Australia). Pesticide: MCPA, 2,4-D, Triclopyr

Glenelg WWTP

# 40555 Glenelg WWTP B Plant Final Effluent A/C         

3/12/2016 MCPA    0.11 ug/l

25/2/2017   MCPA    0.06 ug/l

20/5/2017   MCPA    0.42 ug/l

20/5/2017     2 4-D    0.05 ug/l

23/8/2016    MCPA   0.13 ug/l

23/10/2017 MCPA 0.26 ug/l

31/10/19: MCPA 0.12ug/L, Triclopyr 0.3ug/L

#40556 Glenelg WWTP C&D Plant Final Effluent A/C    

23/8/2016    MCPA    0.16 ug/l

3/12/2016   MCPA     0.17 ug/l

25/2/2017 MCPA     0.10 ug/l

20/5/2017    MCPA   0.43ug/l

29/10/2017 MCPA    0.11ug/l

31/10/19: MCPA 0.1ug/L, Triclopyr 0.3ug/L

Glenelg Waste Water Treatment Plant

23/10/17: MCPA 0.26ug/L (Final effluent after UV)

23/10/17: MCPA 0.11ug/L (Final effluent after UV)

Source SA Water FoI

30/10/18: MCPA 0.15 (WWTP B Plant Final Effluent)

30/10/18: MCPA (WWTP C&D Plant

2016/19: Christies Beach Waste Water Treatment Plant (South Australia). Pesticide: MCPA, Triclopyr, 2,4-D

Christies Beach Waste Water Treatment Plant

#4101 Christies Beach WWTP Final effluent AC 

23/6/2016 MCPA 0.25 ug/l

3/12/2016 MCPA 0.24 ug/l

25/2/2017   2 4-D  0.05 ug/l

25/2/2017 MCPA 0.09 ug/l

20/5/2017 MCPA 0.15 ug/l

23/10/2017 MCPA 0.33 ug/l

31/10/19: MCPA 0.38ug/L, Triclopyr 0.1ug/L

Christies Beach Waste Water Treatment Plant

23/01/17: MCPA 0.41ug/L (Final effluent after UV)

23/01/17: MCPA 0.33ug/L (Final effluent after UV)

30/10/18: MCPA 0.13ug/L (Final Effluent)

30/10/18: Triclopyr 0.1ug/L (Final Effluent)

30/10/18: MCPA 0.16ug/L (WWTP B Plant Final Effluent)

30/10/18: Triclopyr 0.1ug/L (WWTP C & D Plant Final Effluent)

31/10/19: MCPA 0.23ug/L (Final effluent after UV)

 

2018 August: Potential Legal Action (Western Australia). Pesticide: Glyphosate

Councils urged to suspend use of Roundup or face risk of legal action

https://www.communitynews.com.au/hills-gazette/news/councils-urged-to-suspend-use-of-roundup-or-face-risk-of-legal-action

COUNCILS should ban the use of Roundup or risk being sued by employees and residents if their health is affected, say action groups.

The call comes in the wake of a landmark lawsuit in the United States in which a jury found chemical giant Monsanto liable for causing a school groundsman’s cancer from his exposure to the weedkiller.

The active chemical in Roundup – glyphosate –is classified as probably carcinogenic by the World Health Organisation but is still approved for use in Australia.

Alliance for a Clean Environment convenor Jane Bremmer said councils should immediately suspend the use of glyphosate in public places, particularly children’s playgrounds.

“Local government authorities are now compelled by this legal precedent to protect their constituents and worker’s health and their own legal liability by suspending the use of glyphosate in public places and invest in safer, alternative weed control practices,” she said.

“It is simply absurd to suggest that allowing children to play on freshly sprayed grass within minutes of a pesticide application is safe.

“It’s a tragic case of the Emperor’s new clothes with potentially deadly consequences.”

The Shire of Mundaring and City of Kalamunda said they would continue to use glyphosate in line with the advice from the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA) recommendation that products containing the pesticide were safe to use as per the manufacturer’s instructions.

City of Swan CEO Mike Foley acknowledged several European countries had banned the use of glyphosate and said the council would monitor developments nationally and internationally.

Director of Australian anti-GM group Gene Ethics Bob Phelps said the court ruling raised thorny questions for the industry.

“These organisations should now cease their weedkiller use or risk being sued for breach of care to workers and citizens,” he said.

“Roundup is available from most hardware shops and supermarkets and retailers should review their liability for selling an unsafe product and take it off their shelves.”

APVMA chief executive officer Dr Chris Parker said they would continue to track and consider any new scientific information associated with the safety and effectiveness of glyphosate.

“In 2016, the APVMA found no grounds to place glyphosate under formal reconsideration,” he said.

“Glyphosate is registered for use in Australia and APVMA approved products containing glyphosate can continue to be used safely according to label directions.”

Mr Phelps called for an urgent review of Roundup in light of the new evidence discovered during the US trial.

Monsanto has denied the link between glyphosate and cancer and will appeal the decision.

2018 June: Derby Region (Western Australia). Pesticides: 2,4,5-T, 2,4-D

Agent Orange survivor Carl Drysdale slams government inaction

PerthNow

https://www.perthnow.com.au/news/wa/agent-orange-survivor-carl-drysdale-slams-government-inaction-ng-b88850940z

WHILE the colour photographs of his Kimberley days may be dog-eared and fading, the years do not extinguish the fire in Carl Drysdale’s belly.

The 72-year-old Pinjarra grandfather is “still fighting the machine” over the appalling ill-health and the suspicious deaths of dozens of once-healthy men who sprayed the banned 2,4,5-T during government weed eradication programs across WA’s North West in the 1970s and ’80s. It is a scandal that refuses to die, unlike the many men it affected, fuelled by decades-long government inaction and a mean-spirited bureaucracy.

“I look through the old photos and they’re mostly all dead, generally with cancer,” he tells The Sunday Times. “Dying in their 30s and 40s. Most of them are gone.”

But not all of them.

This Tuesday, yet another chapter of the long-running saga opens, with four other Agriculture Protection Board workers from the Kimberley taking their compensation claims back to the courts.

Their lawyers want WorkCover to finally acknowledge the appalling hardships that have befallen them and the wider Kimberley communities, especially in small, close-knit outback towns such as Derby.

“The weed-spraying program has haunted families in the West Kimberley as the preponderance of graves of workers, their children and grandchildren testify,” Chapman’s Lawyers’ Tony Mullen said.

It has been more than 40 years since the young butcher from Perth headed north after getting a job as the West Kimberley district officer for the Agricultural Protection Board.

He was in charge of teams of 15 men — many of them indigenous — who would go bush for up to 10 days, sleeping in swags, cooking their own tucker and enjoying the occasional bath in waterholes.

Armed with spray packs, their job was to eradicate the dreaded Parkinsonian tree, one of the many weeds threatening the burgeoning Kimberley pastoral industry.

What they didn’t know was that they were spraying the dangerous herbicide 2,4,5-T, a hazardous chemical that when mixed with equal parts of 2,4-D was better known as Agent Orange, dropped by US forces during the Vietnam war to defoliate jungles, kill crops and flush out the Viet Cong.

Years before occupational health and safety was a workplace reality and rarely wearing any protective clothing in the searing heat of the Kimberley, the APB workers literally covered themselves with the stuff, day in, day out.

It wasn’t long before the headaches began, and the rashes and sores that never healed. Then they started dying. Young men. Strong men. Men who didn’t know what sickness was.

One death in particular hit Mr Drysdale hard.

Cyril Hunter was just 33 when he died. A big, robust and proud indigenous man, he worked as a sprayer for the APB for seven years under Mr Drysdale.

“I remember talking to him once while he was sitting at the bottom of some stairs where we used to go to get paid,” he said. “He told me that a couple of mates had gone upstairs to pick up his wages.

“It then dawned on me that he couldn’t even get up the stairs. He was so buggered. He died of ventricle failure, a well-known symptom of heavy exposure to the chemical. He was a young man … there were so many of them.”

Appalled by clear anecdotal evidence of a spiralling death rate among APB employees and pushed into action by media, then-premier Geoff Gallop launched the Armstrong Report, led by world-renowned cancer epidemiologist Bruce Armstrong.

While he stopped short of concluding “beyond reasonable doubt” that the spraying program was directly linked to the alarming cancer rate, Dr Armstrong did find that APB workers might have suffered an increased risk of cancer because of their work.

The Gallop government then urged all APB workers and their dependants to file compensation claims. It said they would receive preferential treatment and be expedited through the system.

That was 14 years ago. Some claims have been settled over the years, but many have not.

Mr Drysdale refuses to let the matter die. He is determined to see it through to the end.

“It’s not just one government that pushes back, it’s been all of them,” he says on the seemingly never-ending drama. “They have been stuffing us around again and again. Then all of a sudden, a new government comes in and it starts all over from scratch.

“I know what their strategy is, ‘Let’s just wait, we’ll outlast them’. They are waiting for us to die. Well, I’m not going to give them that pleasure.”

Agriculture Minister Alannah MacTiernan would not be drawn on whether successive State governments had dragged their feet over the issue, only saying that she hoped the matters “can be brought to a conclusion soon”.

She said eight former APB workers had received payments for cancer claims that had been facilitated through the State-based worker’s compensation system.

Those confidential settlements took into account future medical expenses.

Ms MacTiernan said applications for non-cancer claims could still be submitted for assessment.

2014 – Grain Contamination (Victoria) – Flutriafol

Cross-contamination of grain from fungicide-treated fertiliser

https://www.smithandgeorg.com.au/articles/agchemnews/autumn2014/crosscontamination.html

The Victorian Department of Environment and Primary Industries (DEPI) has reported two cases of grain contaminated with the fungicide flutriafol, where flutriafol-treated fertiliser had previously been used in equipment used to handle or store the grain.

In one case a farmer treated fertiliser with flutriafol as it was transferring via an auger to a truck. The truck was swept but the auger was not cleaned or decontaminated. Canola grain was later transferred via the auger to the truck, and when tested showed levels of flutriafol that was 17 times higher than the legal limit.

In the other case a farmer temporarily stored flutriafol-treated fertiliser in a silo, which was not cleaned before later being used to store wheat. The wheat was found to contain levels of flutriafol that are 42 times higher than the legal limit.

These cases illustrate how important it is to thoroughly clean and decontaminate equipment and facilities that are used to handle or store potentially contaminating materials. This does not only apply to grain, but to any food or feed that is handled or transported. Other examples include fresh fruit and vegetables carried in contaminated bins; and processing waste (eg citrus peel, brewers grain, etc) that is carried in trucks or bins and fed to animals.

2016 August: Pesticide Residues (Western Australia). Pesticides: Glyphosate, Imidacloprid, Haloxyfop, Flutriafol, Imazapic, Imazapyr

Vigilance urged on residue levels to protect markets

August 27 2016

https://www.farmweekly.com.au/news/agriculture/cropping/grains/vigilance-urged-on-residue-levels-to-protect-markets/2753581.aspx?storypage=1

WHILE Australia continues to receive a top report card for its compliance with maximum residue levels (MRL), the unregistered use of glyphosate in barley still remains a hot issue for both growers and exporters.

Speaking at the Grain Industry Association of WA (GIWA) barley council spring forum at Lake Grace and the Farmanco client conference in Perth last week, National Residue Survey (NRS) director Ian Reichstein said Australia and WA continued to have 99 per cent compliance when it came to MRL.

“Over the past 15 years, Australia has achieved 99.9pc compliance with Australian MRL in bulk samples and 99pc in containers,” he said.

“This is a very good record and shows to our overseas trading partners we have integrity in grain industry.”

But he warned that single events can damage a market and a grower making the decision to use off-label mixes could have serious ramifications for the industry.

Mr Reichstein said an increased food safety focus in the Asian market meant that growers and those in the supply chain had to be aware of the market requirements and MRLs where the grain was destined.

The NRS received $1.5 million in funding from the Australian grain producer levy to undertake the collection and analysis of 6000 samples of all Australian grain each year. Of this, 2000 samples were of WA grains.

The samples were subjected to multi-residue screening for a range of pesticides, contaminants, heavy metals and fumigants.

“There are still too many people in the industry who believe compliance with Australian MRL is equal to market access, which is completely incorrect,” he said.

For WA growers, the off label use of glyphosate in barley remains a serious issue.

Of the 2000 samples collected in WA last year, 87 barley samples were subjected to the “special” herbicide screen.

Of those, 56 had detectable levels of glyphosate.

While Weedmaster DST (470 grams per litre glyphosate) is registered as a pre-harvest application in wheat, canola, hay and some pulse crops, the in-crop or pre-harvest application of glyphosate in barley is not registered.

Aside from the glyphosate levels in barley samples, Mr Reichstein said there were four MRL violations in WA last year – a canola sample with an imidacloprid reading of 0.086 milligrams per kilogram (Australian MRL of 0.05mg/kg), a second canola sample with haloxyfop 0.63mg/kg (MRL of 0.1mg/kg), an oat sample with a 0.12mg/kg glyphosate reading (MRL of 0.1mg/kg) and a lupin sample with a 0.083mg/kg of flutriafol (no MRL set).

“Some might say that out of 2000 samples, only four incidences is an excellent track record, but there are others that will say four is still too high,” he said.

“However, if you compare some of these results with the MRLs set by our markets, it would appear only 50pc of those samples with residues would be compliant.

“It is a highly risky situation if exporters are not fully aware of the trading requirements for that market.”

Mr Reichstein said non-compliance could become very expensive for the exporter, with cargo rejected or held at port, demurrage, disposal of contaminated grain, on-forwarding or return costs.

“The flow-on effect from a detection is increased sampling and cargo testing which impacts on all exporters and then the whole market can become restricted,” he said.

“Exporters may restrict future exports to avoid higher risks from increased testing and this can impact on the sale of Australian grain.”

Mr Reichstein outlined several cases of other MRL violations in Australia, including the 2014 case of a grower who created a imidazoline herbicide mix of imazapic and imazapyr rather than using the approved Intervix herbicide in a barley crop, which was detected in samples heading to Japan.

As a result, Japan increased its surveillance of Australian barley over the next five years.

“Japan has a high level of trust in Australian grain and while we were able to rectify the issue, we cannot afford to have markets lose confidence in Australia,” he said.

Flutriafol also remains an issue, with inadequate cleaning of trucks in between loads of fungicide-treated fertilisers and grain, leading to contamination, with one sample recording levels 254 times the limit of 0.02mg/kg.

“Since it was identified five years ago, the issue with flutriafol still hasn’t been resolved and we are still finding levels in samples,” Mr Reichstein said.

“Of the 21 samples last year that were more than the Australian MRL, we believe 50pc came from incorrect in-crop use and the other half from trucks or augers.”

Canola which has been treated with Verdict (haloxyfop) was still an issue, as Mr Reichstein said there were 17 violations of the 0.1mg/kg MRL set by the Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicines Authority (APVMA).

“After providing data to APVMA, the label was reviewed and the application timings were changed in 2014,” he said.

“But the old label is still out there and the product appears to be being applied too late in the season and contaminating the crop.

“Growers need to be aware of these issues and how they can affect market access overseas.”

It was also important for exporters to be aware of market MRL.

If countries want to change their MRL, an application is made to the World Trade Organisation through its Sanitary and Phytosanitary (SPS) notification system.

“As 80pc of Australia’s grain is exported, the NRS monitors this very closely in consultation with the grain industry and if a country notifies of a MRL change which might impact on our market access, a submission is prepared which seeks reconsideration of the change to ensure we retain on-going market access,” Mr Reichstein said.

“If we are very mindful of requirements from our markets and there is better communication between growers and handler and marketer on the application of chemicals, we can lower the risk and prevent violations in overseas markets.”

2018 July : Vijayawada (India) – Glyphosate

Imported lentils laced with weed killer

DECCAN CHRONICLE Jul 19, 2018

https://www.deccanchronicle.com/nation/current-affairs/190718/imported-lentils-laced-with-weed-killer.html
Food safety activists said every imported agriculture commodity needed to be tested for chemical residues but this was being ignored here.
 Some lentils that were imported from India by some Canadian restaurants showed 25 parts per billion of glyphosate.

 

Vijayawada: Indians are consuming highly toxic lentils (masoor dal) and moong dal that are imported from Canada and Australia respectively. The lentils and moong dal are induced with the herbicide Glyphosate, that is being used by Canadian and Australian farmers indiscriminately to clear weeds.

Tests conducted by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) on thousands of samples of these lentils and moong dal grown by farmers in Canada and Australia found an average 282 parts per billion (PPB) and 1,000 parts per billion of glyphosate respectively, which is extremely high on any standards.

Some lentils that were imported from India by some Canadian restaurants showed 25 parts per billion of glyphosate. India has been traditionally the biggest producer and consumer of pulses. Recently, it has also become a huge importer of pulses.

On an average, India has been importing 5 to 7 million tonnes of pulses annually. Almost half this quantity is imported from Canada and Australia and the rest from Myanmar, Ukraine, Russia and some African countries.

Glyphosate is known to be highly toxic and harmful to health. It can adversely affect immunity to serious diseases and the absorption of mineral and vitamin nutrients, apart from disrupting protein-related functions.

“India appears to import a lot of pulses from Canada, Australia and Myanmar. I have seen test records of Canadian grown pulses which are all desiccated by glyphosate. I also have seen results of test on Australian moong dal (known as moong beans in Canada) as tested by the CFIA which also had over 1,000 parts per billion of glyphosate,” Indian-born Canadian food security activist Tony Mitra, who made the CFIA test on these pulses for Glyphosate told this newspaper.

“India is also importing these pulses. Consumers do not seem to know if or when they are buying Canadian lentils or lentils mixed with local produce, and how much glyphosate is in their dal. Canadians do not consume these pulses which are grown to be exported  to other countries, especially India. In Canada, in one of the provinces, some millions of acres of land is being used to grow pulses only to be exported to India,” Mr Mitra said.

He added that 87 per cent of Canadian lentils were contaminated and the average level of contamination was 282 parts per billion. Only 40 per cent of Indian samples were contaminated while the average was 25 parts per billion.

Food safety activists said every imported agriculture commodity needed to be tested for chemical residues but this was being ignored here.

“While it is mandatory to label organic products, imported pulses are not labelled. It’s very difficult to find out if we are consuming Canadian pulses or locally grown ones, if they are sold in loose. In some supermarkets, they label the country of origin where we will have a choice whether to buy the packet or not,” said Dr G.V. Ramanjaneyulu, agricultural scientist and founder of Centre for Sustainable Agriculture.

“ At the entry points, these imported pulses are not being checked for glyphosate residue due to which pulses induced the highly toxic chemical from other countries are making their way into India and ultimately into the stomachs of Indians,” he said.

Farmers warned against using glyphosate without proper gear

Food safety and agricultural scientists are warning that the use of glyphosate may prove lethal. They are citing the example of Sri Lanka, where many sugarcane farmers died due to renal failure after being overexposed to the herbicide.

Glyphosate is a popular herbicide among farmers in the Telugu speaking states. Glyphosate is officially allowed to be used in only tea gardens, but is available across the country under various names and brands.“While farmers have to wear astronaut suit kind of gear while using glyphosate, it’s not the case in countries such as India and Sri Lanka, said Mr Tony Mitra, Indian born Canadian food security activist.

2017 August – Accensi Pty Ltd Chemical Company Fined $100,000

Chemical Company Fined $100,000

August 9, 2017 – South Burnett News

Agricultural chemical manufacturer Accensi Pty Ltd has been fined $100,000 for supplying herbicides containing chemical ingredients not listed in the registered formulation.

In March this year, APVMA admitted it had been notified in December 2016 by Nufarm Australia and Syngenta Australia that they were recalling several products, made by Accensi, which had been found to contain chemicals not listed in the registered formulation.

The news that APVMA knew about the contamination and voluntary recalls but had published nothing on its website caused concern among some growers.

One West Australian farmer claimed he had lost up to 90 per cent of his celery crop.

However, after media criticism, APVMA backed down and agreed to publish information about voluntary recalls of agvet chemicals.

However, APVMA Chief Executive Officer Dr Chris Parker said there was no legislative requirement for APVMA to publish information about a voluntary recall by manufacturers.

Dr Parker said on Tuesday that Accensi had settled the payment of four separate infringement notices each totalling $25,000, under section 83(1)(a) of the Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals Code Act 1994.

“These are the largest fines ever issued by the APVMA under the Agvet Code. The fines reflect that the APVMA treats issues affecting the quality of agricultural and veterinary chemicals seriously,” Dr Parker said.

“Crop protection is a multi-billion dollar industry in Australia and farmers rely on agvet chemical manufacturers and registrants to supply registered products that are safe and will work as directed to eliminate pests and weeds and improve agricultural productivity.

“So when we discovered that a manufacturer had supplied chemicals that didn’t meet the registered formulation, we investigated with the full force of the law.”

In addition to settling the infringement notice amounts, Accensi has been invited to provide an Enforceable Undertaking, regarding contamination control of all SC Herbicide products produced in the future.

Dr Parker said APVMA was continuing to work with registrants on the voluntary recall of affected agricultural products.

2017 January: Crop Duster Crash – Mareeba (Queensland)

Pilot escapes unharmed after crop duster crashes into field near Mareeba

A MAN has escaped unharmed after his crop duster crashed into a field on the Atherton Tableland this morning.

Emergency services were called to the light plane crash near Mareeba about 7am.

The 25-year-old pilot is believed to have only sustained a minor finger injury.

He declined to be taken to hospital.

The plane is understood to have been significantly damaged.

2016 September: Crop Duster Crash, north of Esperance (Western Australia)

Pilot injured in plane crash in WA’s south

A pilot has been injured in a crash involving a crop-dusting plane in Western Australia’s south-east.

The crash occurred around 10:00am on a property 105 kilometres north of Esperance.

The pilot, a 29-year-old man from Victoria, was able to exit the plane after suffering non-life threatening injuries.

He is being flown to Perth for treatment and is in a critical condition.

The incident comes just five days after a light plane crash near the Great Southern town of Mount Barker.

Both people aboard that plane survived the crash.

2016 December: Crop Duster Crash Callandoon (Queensland)

Pilot critically injured in crop duster crash near Goondiwindi

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-12-28/crop-duster-crash-near-goondiwindi-leaves-man-critically-injured/8151048

A man in his 40s is in a critical condition after crashing his single-engine crop duster plane in a paddock in Queensland’s southern border region.

The pilot was airlifted to the Princess Alexander Hospital in Brisbane with major internal and facial injuries.

The man was pulled from the wreckage by witnesses, after his crop duster clipped power lines and crashed in a field near Goondiwindi about 7:30am this morning.

Paramedics at the scene said he suffered multiple injuries.

He was initially taken to Goondiwindi Hospital before being flown to Brisbane.

Crop-duster hit ground ‘nose-first and flipped over’

https://www.thechronicle.com.au/news/pilot-injured-after-plane-crash-rural-property/3126690/

UPDATE: An agricultural pilot is fighting for life after a harrowing plane crash on a cotton plantation near Goondiwindi.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau and police are investigating the cause of the crash which left the male pilot, 43, in hospital with serious injuries.

The pilot, from Goondiwindi, had taken off at 6.15am for a scheduled 25-minute chemical spray on the rural property off the Barwon Hwy at Callandoon, about 30km south-west of Goondiwindi.

But when he failed to stop and refuel by 6.45am, the ground crew did a radio check.

After no contact was made with the pilot, a ground search was conducted.

A Goondiwindi farmer from the neighbouring property, Macintyre Downs, found the wreckage of the yellow air-tractor aircraft and pulled the pilot to safety about 7.10am.

He rushed the injured man in his own vehicle and met waiting Queensland Ambulance crews who then transported him by road to Goondiwindi Hospital.

The was later airlifted to the Princess Alexandra Hospital in Brisbane where he was last night in a critical but stable condition.

A police spokesman said initial investigation suggested the single-engine aircraft clipped overhead power lines, snapping two, which downed the craft.

He said the plane hit the ground “nose-first and flipped over”, causing major damage.

The ATSB and police are investigating and will compile an incident report.

10.30AM: A pilot is in a critical condition after a plane crash landed on a rural property in the Goondiwindi region this morning.

The pilot, aged in his 40s, was taken by Queensland Ambulance to Goondiwindi Airport from where RACQ LifeFlight airlifted him to Brisbane.

The man suffered major internal and facial injuries in the landing.

The single pilot agricultural aircraft was flying at a low level when it crashed, clipping a powerline in the process.

He was pulled from the aircraft and taken to a nearby residence before meeting with QAS paramedics.

The man was airlifted to Princess Alexandra Hospital in a critical condition.

8.45AM: Paramedics are treating a male pilot after a crash landing on a rural property this morning.

Queensland Ambulance were called to a private property off the Barwon Hwy at Callandoon near Goondiwindi about 7.30am with reports an agricultural plane had crash landed, injuring the pilot.

The pilot, a man aged in his 40s, had been removed from the plane and taken to a nearby homestead where he was met with paramedics a short time later.

His injuries are as yet unknown.

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services remain at the scene of the fixed-wing aircraft crash which clipped and brought down powerlines.

A spokesman said crews were securing the area.

2017 December: Emerald (Queensland) – Crop Duster Crash

Safety bureau informed of CQ crop duster crash

SUNDAY: THE Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) have been advised of a crop duster crash which happened near an Emerald property on Friday.

A Queensland Police Spokesperson said a 37-year-old male pilot was taken to Emerald Hospital with head and chest injuries after the crash.

Initial investigations suggest the crop duster nosedived into the ground on Munro Rd between 6am and 6.30am on Friday.

Police have now passed information from the scene to ATSB who will determine if further investigation is needed.

FRIDAY: ONE man has been injured in a major aircraft accident on a farm near Emerald this morning.

Queensland Police Service were notified at about 6.20am this morning of reports a crop-dusting plane had crashed on Munro Rd, Emerald.

The man is suffering from head injuries and is being taken to Emerald Hospital by Queensland Ambulance Service in a stable condition.

2018 June: Tamworth (NSW) – Fines for Spray Drift

 

The NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA) has issued fines totaling $2250 to pesticide contractors after spray drift incidents in Moree and Tamworth.

The fines came after the EPA investigated complaints from a Moree grazier and a Tamworth olive grower.

Northern director Adam Gilligan said that in both incidents, the EPA had found evidence that the neighbouring properties had been affected by the spray drift.

Mr Gilligan said that, with winter spraying now under way, pesticide users must take all necessary precautions to ensure they were using pesticide products safely.

Spray drift can impact the agricultural operations of neighbouring properties and pose a serious threat to the health of the operators, community and the environment if spraying is not carried out appropriately,” he said.

The EPA said the Moree landholder had lodged a complaint after his grazing land was subject to spray drift when an aerial operator applied pesticides to a cotton crop on the adjoining farm.

The EPA fined the aerial pesticide operator $1500.

In the other incident, the EPA issued a fine of $750 to a Tamworth-based pesticides contractor after receiving a complaint that pesticides had drifted onto an established olive grove while spraying was occurring on the adjoining farm.

Mr Gilligan said anyone using pesticides was legally required to read the product’s label instructions, follow directions, “and where appropriate, apply suitable buffer distances to ensure pesticides do not drift”.

“Other than people using small amounts of pesticides by hand in non-commercial circumstances, most operators must have received appropriate training and hold current certification in order to apply pesticides,” he said.

“Equally important, they must keep appropriate records.”

2018 June: Moree (NSW) – Fines for Spraydrift

 

The NSW Environment Protection Authority (EPA) has issued fines totaling $2250 to pesticide contractors after spray drift incidents in Moree and Tamworth.

The fines came after the EPA investigated complaints from a Moree grazier and a Tamworth olive grower.

Northern director Adam Gilligan said that in both incidents, the EPA had found evidence that the neighbouring properties had been affected by the spray drift.

Mr Gilligan said that, with winter spraying now under way, pesticide users must take all necessary precautions to ensure they were using pesticide products safely.

Spray drift can impact the agricultural operations of neighbouring properties and pose a serious threat to the health of the operators, community and the environment if spraying is not carried out appropriately,” he said.

The EPA said the Moree landholder had lodged a complaint after his grazing land was subject to spray drift when an aerial operator applied pesticides to a cotton crop on the adjoining farm.

The EPA fined the aerial pesticide operator $1500.

In the other incident, the EPA issued a fine of $750 to a Tamworth-based pesticides contractor after receiving a complaint that pesticides had drifted onto an established olive grove while spraying was occurring on the adjoining farm.

Mr Gilligan said anyone using pesticides was legally required to read the product’s label instructions, follow directions, “and where appropriate, apply suitable buffer distances to ensure pesticides do not drift”.

“Other than people using small amounts of pesticides by hand in non-commercial circumstances, most operators must have received appropriate training and hold current certification in order to apply pesticides,” he said.

“Equally important, they must keep appropriate records.”

1995-2016: Innisfail Water Supply (Queensland). Pesticides: Chlorpyrifos, Fenthion Methyl, Fenthion, Diuron, Simazine, Imidacloprid

Raw Water Innisfail (Queensland)

Raw Water Source Results Summary 1995-2011

Maximum Results: Chlorpyrifos (1 detection) 0.33ug/L, Fenthion Methyl (1 detection) 1.3ug/L, Diuron (4 detections) 0.1ug/L, Simazine (1 detection) 0.01ug/L, Imidacloprid (26 detections) 0.1ug/L, Fenthion (1 detection) 0.007ug/L 15/7/14)

Innisfail 2013-16

Imidacloprid 0.23ug/L (max), 0.06av.

Innisfail Treatment Plant 2001-11

Imidacloprid 0.1ug/L (max), 0.02ug/L av.

Innisfail Treatment Plant 2013-16

Imidacloprid 0.19ug/L (max), 0.05ug/L av

Innisfail 2012-16 South Johnstone

Imidacloprid 0.2ug/L (max), 0.05ug/L av

Source: Cassowary Coast Regional Council – Drinking Water Quality Management Plan June 2017

2016/19: Branyan Water Treatment Plant (Bundaberg-Queensland). Pesticides: Atrazine, Hexazinone, Metolachlor

Branyan Water Treatment Plant Bundaberg

2016/17: Atrazine 0.04ug/L, Hexazinone 0.05ug/L, Metolachlor 0.03ug/L

2017/18: Atrazine 0.02ug/L (max), Hexazinone 0.04ug/L (max), Metolachlor 0.02ug/L (max)

2018/19: Atrazine 0.03ug/L (max), 0.02ug/L (av.), Hexazinone 0.02ug/L (max), 0.01ug/L (av.), Metolachlor 0.03ug/L (max), 0.01ug/L (av.)

Bundaberg Regional Council Drinking Water Quality Management Plans 2016/17, 2017/18, 2018/19

2014/20: River Park Reservoir (Queensland). Pesticides: Atrazine, Hexazinone, Metolachlor, Fipronil

River Park Reservoir (Queensland)

2014/15: Atrazine 0.07ug/L, Metolachlor 0.03ug/L

2015/16: Atrazine 0.05ug/L, Hexazinone 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 0.02ug/L

2016/17: Atrazine 0.16ug/L, Hexazinone 0.09ug/L, Metolachlor 0.07ug/L

2017/18: Atrazine 0.22ug/L (max), 0.07ug/L (mean). Hexazinone 0.08ug/L (max), 0.07ug/L (mean), Metolachlor 0.12ug/L (max), 0.05ug/L (mean)

2018/19: Atrazine 0.09ug/L (max), 0.05ug/L (av.), Hexazinone 0.06ug/L (max), 0.04ug/L (av.), Metolachlor 0.07ug/L (max), 0.03ug/L (av.)

2019/20: Atrazine 0.03ug/L (max), 0.02ug/L (av.), Hexazinone 0.05ug/L (max), 0.04ug/L (av.), Metolachlor 0.01ug/L (max), 0.01ug/L (av.), Fipronil 0.55ug/L (max), 0.15ug/L (av.)

Bundaberg Shire Council Drinking Water Quality Management Plans 2014/20

2014/20: Wallaville Reservoir (Wallaville, Queensland). Pesticides: Atrazine, Hexazinone, Metolachlor, Diuron

Wallaville Reservoir (Wallaville Queensland)

2014/15: Atrazine 0.05ug/L, Hexazinone 0.04ug/L, Metolachlor 0.06ug/L

2015/16: Atrazine 0.15ug/L, Diuron 0.04ug/L, Hexazinone 0.02ug/L, Metolachlor 0.07ug/L

2016/17: Atrazine 0.28ug/L, Hexazinone 0.08ug/L, Metolachlor 0.14ug/L

2017/18: Atrazine 0.13ug/L (max), 0.07ug/L (mean). Hexazinone 0.07ug/L (max), 0.06ug/L (mean). Metolachlor 0.1ug/L (max), 0.05ug/L (mean)

2018/19: Atrazine 0.2ug/L (max), 0.07ug/L (av.), Hexazinone 0.05ug/L (max), 0.04ug/L (av.), Metolachlor 0.21ug/L (max), 0.07ug/L (av.)

2019/20: Hexazinone 0.05ug/L (max), 0.04ug/L (av.), Metolachlor 0.01ug/L (max), 0.01ug/L (av.)

Bundaberg Shire Council Drinking Water Quality Management Plans 2014/20

2013/20: Gregory River Reservoir (Childers/Woodgate, Queensland). Pesticides: Atrazine, Diuron, Metolachlor, Hexazinone

Gregory River Reservoir (Childers/Woodgate Queensland)

2013/14: Atrazine 0.02ug/L, Diuron 0.07ug/L, Metolachlor 0.02ug/L

2014/15: Atrazine 0.56ug/L, Diuron 0.11ug/L, Metolachlor 0.26ug/L

2015/16: Atrazine 0.18ug/L, Diuron 0.1ug/L, Metolachlor 0.33ug/L

2016/17: Diuron 0.03ug/L, Metolachlor 0.07ug/L

2017/18: Atrazine 0.33ug/L (max), 0.12ug/L (av). Hexazinone 0.02ug/L. Metolachlor 0.26ug/L (max), 0.09ug/L (av). Diuron 0.06ug/L (max), 0.04ug/L (av).

2018/19: Atrazine 0.32ug/L (max), 0.14ug/L (av.), Diuron 0.03ug/L (av.), Hexazinone 0.01ug/L (av.), Metolachlor 0.15ug/L (max), 0.08ug/L (av.)

2019/20: Atrazine 0.08ug/L (max), 0.04ug/L (av.), Hexazinone 0.01ug/L (max), 0.01ug/L (av.), Metolachlor 0.03ug/L (max), 0.02ug/L (av.)

Bundaberg Shire Council Drinking Water Quality Management Plans 2013/20